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Author Topic: What's "en en"?  (Read 3397 times)
OZ8AGB
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Posts: 334




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« on: July 05, 2017, 02:39:21 AM »

....or is it just bad sent r r?

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PA0WV
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Posts: 388




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« Reply #1 on: July 05, 2017, 04:56:31 AM »

....or is it just bad sent r r?

Yes, that is called "a fist".

We have to honour use of fists, bananaboat swings, falling of a rock swings and drunk too much C2H5(OH) swings,  and starting bug users sending dididididit  dah because the meaning of the code is determined in a higher layer of in your brains, not as 5 T but as V.

And it discourages all kind of people that are not able to communicate in Morse code, and like to simulate it as if they were able fo do that, by using decoders.
« Last Edit: July 05, 2017, 04:58:33 AM by PA0WV » Logged

N3QE
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« Reply #2 on: July 05, 2017, 07:06:39 AM »

Superlong accentuated dashes in "R R" and asymmetrical dit spacing are a long tradition in ham radio.

I wonder if it can be traced back to something American Morse? The American Morse R didn't have any dashes, just dits. But it did have an asymmetrical longer pause between the first and second dits.
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OZ8AGB
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« Reply #3 on: July 05, 2017, 07:45:06 AM »

I was just wondering after hearing a very proficient high speed guy who usually sends very well spaced code doing it.
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K0UA
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« Reply #4 on: July 05, 2017, 08:14:52 AM »

I was just wondering after hearing a very proficient high speed guy who usually sends very well spaced code doing it.

How do you account for the large number of people that call CQ by sending   dahdidahdit  dit dahdidah.   

The last guy I "copied" doing this was less than a week ago.  It took me a couple minutes to copy his callsign. Yes he bungled it that badly.  I looked him up on QRZ and his bio said he was learning to use a bug.   His 10 minute CQ sequence was never answered by me or anyone else.  I figured if it took me that long to decipher his callsign, I didn't want a QSO with him.  I imagined that many others felt the same way, and passed him by. I am sure a "good" cw man could have copied him just fine. But I am not a "good" cw man,  I need clean code.  Some would call me a "poser", so I guess I am.  But I hear the call of C E K so often on the air and I do not understand it at all.
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K1HMS
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« Reply #5 on: July 05, 2017, 01:00:55 PM »

What is S H I R T  I've seen it a couple of times. I wonder if the R is silent.
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AC7CW
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« Reply #6 on: July 05, 2017, 01:28:52 PM »

I was just wondering after hearing a very proficient high speed guy who usually sends very well spaced code doing it.

How do you account for the large number of people that call CQ by sending   dahdidahdit  dit dahdidah.   

The last guy I "copied" doing this was less than a week ago.  It took me a couple minutes to copy his callsign. Yes he bungled it that badly.  I looked him up on QRZ and his bio said he was learning to use a bug.   His 10 minute CQ sequence was never answered by me or anyone else.  I figured if it took me that long to decipher his callsign, I didn't want a QSO with him.  I imagined that many others felt the same way, and passed him by. I am sure a "good" cw man could have copied him just fine. But I am not a "good" cw man,  I need clean code.  Some would call me a "poser", so I guess I am.  But I hear the call of C E K so often on the air and I do not understand it at all.

Have heard those "call CQ by sending   dahdidahdit  dit dahdidah" but never worked one, afraid of what else they would throw at me...
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Novice 1958, 20WPM Extra now... (and get off my lawn)
GW3OQK
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Posts: 386




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« Reply #7 on: July 06, 2017, 02:15:14 AM »

The "e n" with a long dah is used by some to mean "roger".

I sometimes hear FQ (with shortened dahs) or F EK and I wondered if the first character was being clipped because the rig's T/R relay takes time to go to transmit when the key is pressed.

When the sender can not send good morse, or can not send his call sign error-free, I never answer.   73, Andrew
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AA4Q
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« Reply #8 on: July 06, 2017, 08:46:29 AM »

and you gotta be good at morse to successfully send GW3OQK on the first try!!!!

Smiley

AA4Q
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N4RSS
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Posts: 332




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« Reply #9 on: July 06, 2017, 08:53:58 AM »

I hear EN all the time on the over.  No long dah but an exaggerated space between the E and N. 

Also hear folks repeating BK after having gotten the over.  Suspect it's temporizing before the first thought pops into their heads
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VK5EEE
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Posts: 1053




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« Reply #10 on: July 07, 2017, 08:10:45 AM »

Yes re variations on "CQ" especially on bugs, sometimes it is because some bug users find it hard to send a Q due to difficulty in sending consecutive dahs with short pause between (which is however very easy on a cootie). Other times its just preference or style Smiley

But if you hear something like IE F (with dahs very short) that's American Morse for CQ :-)

However, I wouldn't be afraid to answer a heavily altered FÄ or NNGT etc (instead of CQ) because it may just as well be (don't I know LOL) an OP who is just bored from not getting replies to CQ, and no activity, so making variations to ease boredom, most OPs could recognise it as CQ anyway as it's such a common rhythm and being repeated... I don't think it's an indication the QSO is going to be tough.

No idea what SHIRT is though, not heard that.
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Long Live Real Human CW and wishing you many happy CW QSO - 77 - CW Forever

Support CW and join CW clubs. QTT: FIST#1124, HSC#1437, UFT#728, RCWC#982, SKCC#15007, CWOPS#1714, 30CW#1,
PA0KDW
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Posts: 94




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« Reply #11 on: July 07, 2017, 09:33:39 AM »

VK5EEE

Lou, right, I am one of those cw CQ deformers.

It is
a)to emphasize that CW is real music and furhermore

b)it prevents guys not able at all to decode any CW to contact you with some macro's after watching reverse beacon reports or the screen of their decoders.

Still pounding the brass producing quavering sounds,

Frans
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KD8IIC
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« Reply #12 on: July 07, 2017, 08:02:50 PM »

  What's E N? It's just a Bad Sending Habit pure es simple.
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PA0WV
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Posts: 388




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« Reply #13 on: July 08, 2017, 06:14:52 AM »

 What's E N? It's just a Bad Sending Habit pure es simple.

Not at all,

It is an emphasis of :"I received everything perfectly correct"

Just like you have the opportunity in plain spoken language  to emphasize thoughts by prolonging soundparts of a word. you have that in Morse code too by suddenly changing the speed. Nothing wrong about that.

OK decoders can't handle it and react with ETT TE EET but guys that are curious to know what real radio amateurs are doing and communicating, ought to learn Morse code to find out instead of buying with easy money some decoder.  And worse: try to make a QSO with the help of beacon stations for the call and macro's

gd luck
« Last Edit: July 08, 2017, 06:28:18 AM by PA0WV » Logged

K0UA
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Posts: 1362




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« Reply #14 on: July 08, 2017, 06:23:53 AM »

I would agree that sending bad CW is a long standing Amateur tradition.  That is why the Q signal  of QLF (try sending with your left foot) was invented over 100 years ago.
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