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Author Topic: WTH? Removing the fuse from a DC power cord?  (Read 1723 times)
KJ6ZOL
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Posts: 820




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« on: August 03, 2017, 07:43:50 PM »

My new radio came with a DC power cord that had been hacked up in a really weird way. Somebody had actually cut the fuse holder out of the "hot" cable, and spliced the ends together with some sort of strange splice that I've never seen before, it was like a crimp connection except it didn't show signs of crimping, and it wasn't a heatshrink connector either. Even weirder, this person did the same to the ground cable!  Huh Huh Huh Huh I had to chop out both splices and put an aftermarket fuse holder in the hot cable, and re-splice the ground cable since I had no clue how good the splice was. The seller had used his own power cord for the rig and hadn't used the one he gave me. He showed me the splices and said "gee, you'll have to call HRO and ask them what to do", well the old RTFM method works better. I think I have one of the old splices on my workbench, I'll have to try and get a pic of it online. Why would anybody cut out the fuse holder from a DC cord?
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N8YX
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« Reply #1 on: August 03, 2017, 07:48:47 PM »

...Why would anybody cut out the fuse holder from a DC cord?
Because the OEM fuse was a non-standard size or type and it blew, without possibility of replacement.

That's Reason Number One.

Number Two would be the use of a RigRunner with its own bank of fuses. None of my DC supply cables have inline holders, especially if I build them from scratch. That's what the RigRunner is for.
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KJ6ZOL
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« Reply #2 on: August 03, 2017, 09:39:11 PM »

...Why would anybody cut out the fuse holder from a DC cord?
Because the OEM fuse was a non-standard size or type and it blew, without possibility of replacement.

That's Reason Number One.

Number Two would be the use of a RigRunner with its own bank of fuses. None of my DC supply cables have inline holders, especially if I build them from scratch. That's what the RigRunner is for.

The manual says that a spare fuse was included with the radio. The fuse rating is fairly weird-25 amps. I had to use an automotive fuse. I managed to get a fuse holder from Fry's, but had to go to an auto parts store to find a 25 amp fuse that would fit in the fuse holder. Standard tubular fuses only go up to 20 amps. My radio can go up to 22 amps output, according to the manual, so apparently Yaesu uses a 25 amp fuse for the FT-950. #2 is also a possibility, since the 950 is often used for contesting, and serious contesters can have some pretty elaborate setups.
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KC8KTN
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« Reply #3 on: August 03, 2017, 10:03:50 PM »

Wow.
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K9MHZ
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« Reply #4 on: August 04, 2017, 05:48:05 AM »

Many commercial radios use the automotive style fuse holders.  If they're 800-900 MHz or higher, they'll draw a considerable amount of current for their transmitter power levels, much more than amateur rigs of similar power levels used on lower frequencies.  Efficiencies of devices, frequency multiplication, etc.  So, many manufacturers opt for the automotive fuse holder to both accommodate those bigger fuses as well as providing a more robust installation in an engine compartment near the battery.        
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K7AAT
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« Reply #5 on: August 04, 2017, 09:29:48 AM »

...Why would anybody cut out the fuse holder from a DC cord?
Because the OEM fuse was a non-standard size or type and it blew, without possibility of replacement.

That's Reason Number One.

Number Two would be the use of a RigRunner with its own bank of fuses. None of my DC supply cables have inline holders, especially if I build them from scratch. That's what the RigRunner is for.

The manual says that a spare fuse was included with the radio. The fuse rating is fairly weird-25 amps. I had to use an automotive fuse. I managed to get a fuse holder from Fry's, but had to go to an auto parts store to find a 25 amp fuse that would fit in the fuse holder. Standard tubular fuses only go up to 20 amps. My radio can go up to 22 amps output, according to the manual, so apparently Yaesu uses a 25 amp fuse for the FT-950. #2 is also a possibility, since the 950 is often used for contesting, and serious contesters can have some pretty elaborate setups.

No,  I have seen standard size AGC fuses up to 60 amps .... and 30A is common in most hardware and automotive stores last time I looked.
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KAPT4560
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« Reply #6 on: August 04, 2017, 12:28:09 PM »

 That's easy. Two 30 amp fuses in parallel makes a 60 amp fuse. Grin

or 

http://gunfreezone.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/fuse-replecement-feral.jpg  Cheesy
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KJ6ZOL
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Posts: 820




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« Reply #7 on: August 04, 2017, 12:36:22 PM »

...Why would anybody cut out the fuse holder from a DC cord?
Because the OEM fuse was a non-standard size or type and it blew, without possibility of replacement.

That's Reason Number One.

Number Two would be the use of a RigRunner with its own bank of fuses. None of my DC supply cables have inline holders, especially if I build them from scratch. That's what the RigRunner is for.

The manual says that a spare fuse was included with the radio. The fuse rating is fairly weird-25 amps. I had to use an automotive fuse. I managed to get a fuse holder from Fry's, but had to go to an auto parts store to find a 25 amp fuse that would fit in the fuse holder. Standard tubular fuses only go up to 20 amps. My radio can go up to 22 amps output, according to the manual, so apparently Yaesu uses a 25 amp fuse for the FT-950. #2 is also a possibility, since the 950 is often used for contesting, and serious contesters can have some pretty elaborate setups.

No,  I have seen standard size AGC fuses up to 60 amps .... and 30A is common in most hardware and automotive stores last time I looked.


Hm, I certainly couldn't find any 30 amp AGC fuses. I'm sure they exist, but likely for specialized applications, meaning stuff beyond common electronic and auto uses. When I was at Fry's I couldn't find any AGC fuse holders that could handle anything above 20 amps.
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N8YX
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« Reply #8 on: August 04, 2017, 02:32:12 PM »

...When I was at Fry's I couldn't find any AGC fuse holders that could handle anything above 20 amps.
Auto Zone, Advance Auto, Pep Boys, Oreilly's and similar are your friends.

I have an OEM DC cord in my Pile 'o Parts whose fuse holders use fuses that are physically larger than your standard automotive glass types. Good luck finding a local source for those.
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WZ7U
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Posts: 598




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« Reply #9 on: August 04, 2017, 03:02:57 PM »

That's easy. Two 30 amp fuses in parallel makes a 60 amp fuse. Grin

or 

http://gunfreezone.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/fuse-replecement-feral.jpg  Cheesy

Wait, what?
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================================================
WZ7U ~ originating from CN86jc +/-

Yet another imperfect being created by THE perfect God. Thank you Jesus!
KJ6ZOL
Member

Posts: 820




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« Reply #10 on: August 04, 2017, 06:25:33 PM »

...When I was at Fry's I couldn't find any AGC fuse holders that could handle anything above 20 amps.
Auto Zone, Advance Auto, Pep Boys, Oreilly's and similar are your friends.

I have an OEM DC cord in my Pile 'o Parts whose fuse holders use fuses that are physically larger than your standard automotive glass types. Good luck finding a local source for those.

I thought I wrote that I ultimately found a 25 amp fuse that fit the holder; I found it at the big Oreilly store near downtown Roseville. Funny enough, they actually didn't have any stocked on the floor except for a couple mega packs. So the guy dragged out a big plastic bin, rummaged through it, and found a smaller package of fuses.
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KJ6ZOL
Member

Posts: 820




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« Reply #11 on: August 04, 2017, 06:32:33 PM »

That's easy. Two 30 amp fuses in parallel makes a 60 amp fuse. Grin

or 

http://gunfreezone.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/fuse-replecement-feral.jpg  Cheesy

There have been urban legends circulating for decades about rednecks stuffing bullets in pickup fuse holders in a pinch, only to have the bullet detonate when it got hot enough. Apparently, before auto fuses were standardized, some of the heavier duty fuse boxes in some pickups had fuse holders that could accept small bullets.
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K8AXW
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« Reply #12 on: August 05, 2017, 08:02:09 PM »

.22s work great for this and when they blow, you don't have to guess "if it's a fuse or something else!"     Roll Eyes
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AA4HA
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Posts: 2384




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« Reply #13 on: August 07, 2017, 06:45:32 AM »

A common replacement for the glass and brass screw type fuses that were in home circuit boxes 70-80 years ago was to unscrew the bad fuse and to put a penny in the holder and screw the bad fuse back in.

One of the first things I did when I bought my first home was to have air conditioning installed. It was a bit of a impulse buy; I was at a hot dog stand and they had a sign up that they also did HVAC work; In retrospect it does seem like an odd combination but hey, "knows what type of mustard to put on a bratwurst, should know how to install a heat exchanger".... Well, it made sense to me back then (it was the early 80's a confusing decade).

They installed the air conditioning when I wasn't at home, I had a friend let them in and watch the house while they were there. When I came home that evening I was greeted by wonderful air conditioned air blowing from the vents... a success!

Through that summer when I was in the yard I would catch the aroma of something plasticy-melty-hot but could never narrow down where it was coming from. Thinking the neighbor kids were burning things in their yard I just mentally logged it and moved on.

On a really hot day in late August I was planting flowers near the air conditioning unit and noticed that the vinyl siding on the house looked a bit saggy right around the disconnect switch. Touching the disconnect and it was flamethrower hot so I ran inside and turned off the breaker to the compressor.

Outside I opened up the disconnect, it was one of those styles where there is a big black piece of phenolic with a pull-handle and two cartridge fuses in clips on the underside. The entire thing was a roasted mess and instead of fuses I found two pieces of 1/2" thinwall coax that were installed instead of fuses.

Apparently they did not have fuses on their truck but they did have conduit. The heating was caused by the bad electrical connection and not due to an overload situation.

There was no HVAC/ Hot-dog stand to go back to, the storefront now sold vitamins (and probably outpatient surgery).
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Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
Free space loss (dB) = 32.4 + 20 × log10d + 20 × log10 f
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