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Author Topic: Supply power to 3 Patriot PT2B3TDN fans?  (Read 777 times)
KG7WAQ
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Posts: 21




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« on: August 16, 2017, 09:51:23 AM »

I have 3 Patriot PT2B3TDN fans I'm setting up to cool my equipment. I've never been good at figuring out power needs, is anyone able to assist me?
What kind of setup do I need to do to power these fans? I might put a potentiometer in line to adjust fan speed, but really just want to get them running.
The fans I have don't have much info on them, but in looking up the model i get this info:
Input 115VAC, .27/.26 A, 50/60 Hz, 30/31 W
To use AC do I just hard wire a plug from the wall and daisy-chain the 3 of them?
Thanks for your help.
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K0BT
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Posts: 365




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« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2017, 01:40:48 PM »

Evan,

You would wire the three Patriot fans in parallel with one another, being careful to identify and set aside (isolate) the separate tachometer ("fan performance sensor") wire on each fan. The tach signal is there to provide a safety signal to external equipment, but these style fans don't take well to speed control. They are also loud. At 54 dBA each, spinning at more than 3000 RPM, they might make your shack sound like a server room.   

Unless you really need the airflow and static pressure, you might consider a couple of 12V computer fans. The 120mm ones are pretty quiet at less than 25 dBA and off-the-shelf fan controllers are available almost everywhere.  They will run on a 13.8V shack supply with a typical increase of only a couple milliamps in current draw, but that makes them both faster and louder.  You can customize the fan speed and noise level with a simple 20 to 100 ohm resistor in series with each fan, or you can run at least a half dozen of them from a 12V, 1A wall wart.

Bob, K0BT
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KG7WAQ
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Posts: 21




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« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2017, 01:55:37 PM »

That helps a lot. I'll see how noisy these fans are (as I got them for free), if they do end up too loud I'll get some quiet computer fans.
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K5LXP
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Posts: 5369


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« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2017, 04:28:04 PM »

DC fans are electronically commutated and may generate EMI.  AC fans are usually electrically quieter.  Something you can try is to wire your fans in series which will make them run more slowly, and more quietly.  You could experiment to see if fans running at 1/2 or 1/3 voltage will still have enough airflow to achieve the degree of cooling you need.  Once upon a time I needed to cool an audio amplifier and two 120V fans in series provided sufficient airflow and made very little audible noise.

Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
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N3QE
Member

Posts: 5021




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« Reply #4 on: August 18, 2017, 06:01:02 AM »

I have 3 Patriot PT2B3TDN fans I'm setting up to cool my equipment. I've never been good at figuring out power needs, is anyone able to assist me?
What kind of setup do I need to do to power these fans? I might put a potentiometer in line to adjust fan speed, but really just want to get them running.
The fans I have don't have much info on them, but in looking up the model i get this info:
Input 115VAC, .27/.26 A, 50/60 Hz, 30/31 W
To use AC do I just hard wire a plug from the wall and daisy-chain the 3 of them?
Thanks for your help.

I did a little research and was unable to find that exact part number, but I'm pretty sure these are very traditional 120VAC capacitor-start fans.

You will want a switch and fuse between the wall plug and the fans. A 2A slow-blow could be a good choice for the fuse.

It is not obvious from my datasheet searches whether these particular fans use quick-disconnects or the common 120VAC fan connector. In any event, keep the wiring well-insulated and if possible in a metal channel to minimize the possibility of fingers touching the AC wiring.

Putting a potentiometer between wall and fans is not a good way of adjusting the speed of an AC fan like this.

If you want to vary the airflow, you might just use three toggle switches, one to control each fan. One on is low airflow, 3 on is high airflow.
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