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Author Topic: DX Stations UP  (Read 1245 times)
KM5PS
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« on: April 19, 2009, 04:29:45 PM »

When a DX station calling CQ DX UP-Does that mean that they are receiving 2 Kilohertz up? I am not for sure if I am understanding this correctly or not. Can anyone help me out here. The way that I am understanding it is for example- I am receiving the dx station on 14015.15 but need to transmit on 14017.15. Is this correct or am I not understanding this. I have tried to make contacts this way but no luck yet. Any help would be appreciated.

Tnx
John-KM5PS
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WW3QB
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« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2009, 04:54:51 PM »

Yes, but it may not be 2 kHz up. The pileup may be spread out from 1-5 kHz or even more. Never transmit on the DX frequency when the DX is saying UP (or DN). Try to listen to the pileup. If you can find the station that the DX is working you can start from there. It is not easy and often frustrating (but I keep on doing it). If there is no pileup, often UP means just 1 kHz up.
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AF3Y
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« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2009, 04:59:15 PM »

John, the best way to ascertain what UP means is to listen up until you find the pileup. You can listen to the pile and figure it out pretty easy. If the pile is large, the DX will "spread them out" by listening over a range of several Khz or more, depending on the size and rabidity (Is that a word?? hi) of the pileup.  Normally, UP is 1 Khz on CW and 5 Khz on SSB, but that is NOT cast in stone. Good Luck and Good DX!  Gene AF3Y
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KM5PS
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« Reply #3 on: April 19, 2009, 05:01:40 PM »

Okay Thanks for the information. I was on the right track after all. I haven't really been trying to chase much DX but I am enjoying it more and more. Thanks again for the information.

73's
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W7ETA
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« Reply #4 on: April 19, 2009, 06:37:08 PM »

Up simply means listening up.

Up 2 means listening up 2.

The FUN in cracking a pile up is discovering where the DX is listening and then forecasting where they will listen next.

To forecast you must find a pattern of how the DX works thru the pile-up.  One does that by finding the station the DX is working.

Common patterns are starting at the bottom of the pile up and then listening up a little more each time.  Some ops hit the end of a pile up and start working down--some hit the end of the pile-up and start at the bottom again;  some ops stay on one frequency until there is too much QRM to easily pick out a call, and then go look for a spot where it easy to pick out a call.

If it is a DXpedetion and they go silent for a bit, it might indicate changing operators, a change in the pattern you have noticed.

Happy hunting
Bob
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KB9CRY
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« Reply #5 on: April 19, 2009, 07:32:31 PM »

Up means listening up in frequency.  You have to use your VFO and your ears to figure out how much.

Anything less wouldn't be a challenge.
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G0RIF
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« Reply #6 on: April 20, 2009, 03:21:01 AM »

"The FUN in cracking a pile up is discovering where the DX is listening and then forecasting where they will listen next."

All too true - the extra buzz is when you get it right and get the contact.

Case in point, the recent S04R operations from Western Sahara. The pile-ups were W-I-D-E and I had spent hours calling at various frequencies between 2 and 10 up (the pile was wider at times!) with no luck on both 17m RTTY and 30m CW (loudest signals for me were mid to late afternoons on 17m and late evenings on 30m).

On the evening of the 16th of April I was lucking out around the low end of the CW pile-up on 30m when I noticed a few consecutive cluster posts from US stations of 'worked up 9' and 'worked up 9.5' - it seemed like the operator was working a few at the higher end of the pile so I took a punt on 9.25 up and got a solid QSO within a few calls.

To be honest though I do prefer it when a DX station gives a suggestion of the listening frequency range (eg. UP 1-5 or UP 5-10) - I don't recall seeing (RTTY) or hearing (CW) S04R suggest a range once, although to be fair I didn't hear them much on SSB so can't really comment much about that. Granted a smaller range makes for a 'denser' pile-up but it does help to limit how much of the band is used by the pile. Just my 2 cents.

73, Dean - G0RIF
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XW1B
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« Reply #7 on: July 05, 2009, 10:03:32 PM »

Some good info posted already John.  Just thought I'd toss in my 2 cents worth......

I ALWAYS work split once the pile up starts.....when I say "UP" I start listening up 1khz and tune up from there.  I try to keep the activity between 1 and 3khz up so as not to hog a lot of space.

HINT: If you're QRP or a 100w/dipole station go HIGH.
I always listen for weak stations on the fringes.

As many have said, listen! Find the person the DX is presently working then go up, or down, slightly and make your call.

Have fun, enjoy the chase, and good DX!

Bruce, XW1B
Vientiane, LAOS
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K2MK
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« Reply #8 on: July 06, 2009, 05:29:28 AM »

Also John, just send your call once. On CW it's common for the DX to come back quickly with a partial call. You have to listen carefully. He might send PS in a quick burst. This is your opportunity to send your call once again. If you had sent your call twice initially you might have missed his short partial transmission.
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N5MOA
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« Reply #9 on: July 06, 2009, 08:40:46 AM »

Bruce XW1B:

"HINT: If you're QRP or a 100w/dipole station go HIGH.
I always listen for weak stations on the fringes."





The fringes are where I'm usually at in a pileup. 400w and a dipole doesn't compete well on the same frequency as someone with a better antenna.

 Sometimes, chasing the last person worked works, but a lot of people do that.

Sometimes working the edges of the pileup works.

Sometimes sitting at one end, while most of the others try to tail end the last worked, works.

The main thing is to find where the pile up is (listen), then keep trying different tactics till something works.

Unless it's one of those (many) occasions where nothing works. Chalk that up to "try another day".

73, Tom


 p.s.  Thanks for the new one, Bruce. Your manager does a real quick turn around.
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M0TTB
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« Reply #10 on: July 06, 2009, 09:25:57 AM »

"Sometimes, chasing the last person worked works, but a lot of people do that"

That's basically it these days, everyone piling in on the last worked frequency...defeats the object a bit.

Anyway, as for 'listening up' on ssb, 3khz is usually a safe starting point, but the key is listening and being aware of what's taking place.
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Andy
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N3ZC
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« Reply #11 on: July 08, 2009, 07:31:51 AM »

Like with the TZ6EI Mali Dxped..He was on 14203, listening up...He kept saying "Spread it out guys!"...Everyone was hanging between 14206 and 14210..so was I..till I sorta got fed up & thought I'd try 14211..why not?..NO ONE was calling there..When he said "TZ6EI QRZ, listening up..spread it out guys!"...I called one time & got em'. Like the previous posts said..you just gotta listen & see what the op is doing..the pattern..

           73'..Tom  N3ZC
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K9NW
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« Reply #12 on: July 08, 2009, 03:27:21 PM »

One somewhat recent expedition op was heard saying "listening 210-220 but mostly on 212."  Bottom line is you just have to adjust to the situation.
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KB9CRY
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« Reply #13 on: July 08, 2009, 06:46:34 PM »

The Complete DXer by Bob Locher
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KB2FCV
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« Reply #14 on: July 13, 2009, 12:25:31 PM »

If they are listening in a range, I try to figure out what direction they are tuning and then throw myself out a little ahead of that. Since I am a small station with 100w and an indoor antenna it sometimes takes a little longer but I usually do make it through (unless they decide to QSY or QRT). 73, James KB2FCV
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