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Author Topic: What antenna restrictions in your country?  (Read 886 times)
VK5EEE
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Posts: 936




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« on: September 04, 2017, 01:28:41 AM »

I'm used to being in countries where an antenna of any height and size is considered a natural human right. Naturally common sense prevails, if it is high enough for aircraft to hit it, red flashing lights are required, and it should not fall over and hurt anyone. But in VK I have found amazing restrictions, both to power and to antenna heights, amazing given the huge size of this country and the low population density. All neighboring countries are allowed high power and high antennas. In much more crowded JA and HS there does not seem to be any problem putting up towers.

Here in VK the height of antennas is set by local council bureaucrats, not by any national law, it would seem, and they hold all the powers. If you want to exceed those heights you would have to enter into prohibitively expensive long procedures to be granted "planning permission", i.e. permission to plan. Getting past the planning to the execution would likely be in another life. So I thought I'd ask how it is in your country?

Here it varies by state. I believe in VK3 they are only allowed free standing antenna structure up to 8m. Here in VK5 it is 10m. If it is affixed to the house or a building, it is only allowed to be 3m long above the highest point of fixture.

Here is the story of a poor ham who is only allowed to have his tower up 4m YES FOUR METRES you read that right, and AT NIGHT he can put it up 8m, when the 20-15-10m bands are closed. And his "right" to have his tower cranked up 4m during the day and 8m at night along with other restrictions only came after a lengthy battle with much support.

Mobile antennas, are not allowed to exceed 4.3m above the road level on any vehicle which is generally more reasonable.
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Long Live Real Human CW and wishing you many happy CW QSO - 77 - CW Forever
G4LNA
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Posts: 125




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« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2017, 01:43:43 AM »

We do have restrictions and they are quite tight.

https://www.planningportal.co.uk/info/200130/common_projects/48/satellitetv_and_radio_antenna

Anything outside those dimensions require planning permission. How they are enforced is largely down to the local authority, some of the TV antenna in this area are 10M above an existing building which is already 10M high, so although strictly speaking I do need planning permission for my two 9M poles, I just point to the forest of masts across our valley.
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VK5EEE
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« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2017, 05:04:42 AM »

Heavens! Cubic capacity of the antenna  Angry and blah blah... thank goodness for mass disobedience!
By the way, the local regulations here are 7m for any structure with only Radio Amateurs having by virtue of being licensed, the 10m limit. So for everyone else it's 7m. It looks like you don't have any different rules for Radio Amateurs  Angry
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Long Live Real Human CW and wishing you many happy CW QSO - 77 - CW Forever
W4KYR
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« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2017, 05:13:46 AM »

In the U.S. there is a requirement that any tower over 200 feet must have a flashing light (beacon). In addition, if you live within a certain distance of an airport there is a height restriction from the nearest runway. For instance, if you live 1/4 mile from an airport runway you can't put up a 200 foot tower. I'm sure others much more knowledgeable than I will elaborate further.


Note: These are federal restrictions only, more restrictions can be imposed through deed restrictions, neighborhood associations, towns and city ordinances which can sometimes vary greatly from one area to another.

Generally if you live out in the sticks, on your own land and away from airports you should be able to put up a 200 foot tower (or higher if you have a flashing beacon).
« Last Edit: September 04, 2017, 05:17:01 AM by W4KYR » Logged

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K6LO
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Posts: 262




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« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2017, 07:09:54 AM »

[quote author=W4KYR link=topic=116537.msg1018358#msg1018358 date=1504527226

.....Note: These are federal restrictions only, more restrictions can be imposed through deed restrictions, neighborhood associations, towns and city ordinances which can sometimes vary greatly from one area to another.

Generally if you live out in the sticks, on your own land and away from airports you should be able to put up a 200 foot tower (or higher if you have a flashing beacon).
[/quote]

In theory, Louis, here in the States we also have PRB-1, Federal preemption over overly restrictive local public ordinances.  It often causes antenna installations to work backwards. An overreaching municipality will throw a tizzy and refuse to allow a permit, so the amateur ignores them and builds a reasonable structure to code anyway.  This leads to expensive legal wrangling in which the amateurs most often win. We have a 45 foot tower ordinance here in my town.  There is specific language promoting and permitting amateur antennas.  I am glad I built my tower long before then.  Despite the language, I am sure if I applied for a permit for a new tower the city council would have kittens.

73 - Luke
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K0UA
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Posts: 867




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« Reply #5 on: September 04, 2017, 07:59:09 AM »

Some amateurs here have towers over 200 feet, Of course the lighting  and distance from airports apply.  But for instance where I live I could easily put up a larger tower.  Mine is only 40 foot, but that was my choice, not a restrictive thing. My previous residence, I had a 100 foot tower. I can also pee off of the porch, and shoot my handguns into my gravel pile.   Don't worry, we are working on losing our freedoms to become more like you guys down under.  It is just a matter of time.
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VK5EEE
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Posts: 936




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« Reply #6 on: September 04, 2017, 07:46:52 PM »

Thanks for all the interesting and educational comments everyone, do keep them coming.

Don't worry, we are working on losing our freedoms to become more like you guys down under.  It is just a matter of time.
I thought as much, it seems to be a worldwide trend Sad
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Long Live Real Human CW and wishing you many happy CW QSO - 77 - CW Forever
DU7DVE
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Posts: 321




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« Reply #7 on: September 05, 2017, 01:19:51 AM »

The only restriction for me now is monetary. Smiley
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VK5EEE
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Posts: 936




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« Reply #8 on: September 05, 2017, 08:25:45 AM »

The only restriction for me now is monetary. Smiley
The land of the free IF you have money!  Grin
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Long Live Real Human CW and wishing you many happy CW QSO - 77 - CW Forever
SM0AOM
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Posts: 189




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« Reply #9 on: September 05, 2017, 12:37:39 PM »

The antenna restrictions here are quite complex, and vary from place to place.

I feel it is appropriate to start with the case when the radio amateur is a tenant.

A tenant has to abide with the contract conditions of the lease, and most landlords interpret the
general legal framework of tenant laws to prohibit external antennas of any type.

Sometimes a separate lease contract can be worked out for putting up an amateur antenna.
This has become more and more difficult, as the cellular operators easily outbid amateurs for
prime rooftop estate in the cities.

When the amateur owns an apartment in a co-dominium, he in practice negotiates with himself
as a party of the association that owns the property. Sometimes it can work out, but usually the
amateur is voted down. Especially when there is cellular operator competition.

Finally,when the amateur owns the property.

Antenna permissions on properties are in principle governed by the legal framework of the "Building and Planning Act",
which actually exempt "lesser structures solely intended for the use within a specific property" from planning permission requirements.
This would in theory give the property owning amateur freedom to erect any safe antenna structure on his lot.

However, this has not got the necessary processing in court to form a formal legal precedent.
In reality, the opinions of the neighbours usually have the final say,and the actual interpretations differ considerably between jurisdictions.

In the more densely populated areas, where cellular operators are pressing for tower and rooftop antenna space,
the planning authorities have become very restrictive for granting permissions for amateurs,
and have in some cases used the neighbour's objections as reasons for demanding the removal
of amateur antennas.

An increasing awareness by the general public of Electromagnetic Field exposure has
further worsened the possibilities for erecting amateur antennas.

Many neighbours openly question the appropriety of using high-level RF
for hobby purposes in residential areas.

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VK4FFAB
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« Reply #10 on: September 05, 2017, 04:06:28 PM »

If you want to exceed those heights you would have to enter into prohibitively expensive long procedures to be granted "planning permission", i.e. permission to plan.

While the process is convoluted, its hardly expensive, cannot comment on your council, but for most the vk4 ones anyone earning minimum wage should be able to afford the $800 lodgement fee.
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DU7DVE
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Posts: 321




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« Reply #11 on: September 05, 2017, 04:38:42 PM »

The only restriction for me now is monetary. Smiley
The land of the free IF you have money!  Grin

 Grin Grin Grin
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ZL1BBW
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Posts: 1214




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« Reply #12 on: September 05, 2017, 04:59:44 PM »

The norm here in town is now around 20mtrs in some areas, others are a bit lower.
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ex MN Radio Officer, Portishead Radio GKA, BT Radio Amateur Morse Tester.  Licensed as G3YCP ZL1DAB, now taken over my father (sk) call as ZL1BBW.
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