Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

donate to eham
   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Good adjustable rope hitch  (Read 474 times)
JS6TMW
Member

Posts: 1171




Ignore
« on: September 13, 2017, 06:11:45 PM »

For adjusting guy ropes I've used Midshipman's Hitches successfully with paracord and thin twisted ropes, but it fails with a thicker cotton rope I'm using on a vertical pole. What other slip hitches are out there and what do you use?

Steve in Okinawa
Logged
N6PAA
Member

Posts: 62




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2017, 06:49:12 PM »

I use the bowline knot mostly for mast guy lines. But there's so many other knots to choose from for example:
https://www.pinterest.com/pin/183732859778780100/
http://www.animatedknots.com/indexboating.php#ScrollPoint
HTH
Ron
Logged
K6AER
Member

Posts: 4564




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2017, 07:42:26 PM »

Use a clove hitch.
Logged
WB6BYU
Member

Posts: 16794




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2017, 09:42:44 PM »

Is this to tie the guy rope to the pole, or to the anchor at the other end?

I use a number of options to tie to the mast. For example, folding a
bight in the middle of a 100' rope and tying that to the mast with a
clove hitch gives me two 50' guy ropes plus a loop to tie the third one
to.  But now I tend to pre-tie a bowline that is the right size to slip over
the swagged end and reuse the same ropes.

For an adjustable knot on the anchor end I use a tautline hitch.  Well,
that was what it was called when I was a Scout, but it often appears
under other names now.  It allows me to adjust my he tension on the
guy by sliding it along the standing rope, and can also be tied "slippery".
Usually I tie it using a bight in the middle of the rope, wherever convenient
to the anchor.
Logged
JS6TMW
Member

Posts: 1171




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: September 13, 2017, 10:10:37 PM »

Thanks Dale. Yes, at the anchor end. On the poles I usually use a hose clamp and solid loops for the ropes.  I'll try a tautline hitch.

There must also be gadgets that are used for tightening loads. I could order some if I knew what kind would work well and last in the sunlight.

Steve
Logged
JS6TMW
Member

Posts: 1171




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2017, 12:37:18 AM »

Ron, thanks for those links. The second one is very informative, and I learned that the tautline and midshipman's are the same, and the nomenclature and liverties taken by the Scout Handbook over the years are somewhat controversial in the knot world Wink.

I also found the Trucker's hitch there  which might be a better choice once the guys are adjusted with an easily adjustable hitch. Then I could go around and substitute a trucker's hitch.

The reason for my initial post is that yesterday we were hit with the first typhoon since I have had the current antennas up. Since it was being called a Category 1, I decided to ride it out and see how well I made them.  I estimate that it gusted up to about 60 mph. Aside from the midshipman's hitch that keeps slipping (and I need to verify I did it correctly), the only other casualties have been due to insecure fastening of pulleys to standing objects.

73,

Steve

Logged
SWMAN
Member

Posts: 1048




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2017, 04:17:22 AM »

 Ron, I really like those knot web sights, I didn't realize there were so many types of knots.
Logged
N1LO
Member

Posts: 1086


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #7 on: September 14, 2017, 05:32:22 AM »

Knots are fascinating, you can make something so simple as a piece of rope perform a complex function.

Taut line hitch, great knot, similar to the prusik rope grabbing knot.

 Definitely ditch the cheap cotton rope and use braided polyester/Dacron. Paracord is usually nylon, 2nd best choice but not quite as UV resistant for long term use. Don't fall for rope labeled 'poly', short for polypropylene, make sure it says polyester.

Btw, 'dacron' is a trade name for one manufacturer's polyester rope. Polyester is the generic name.

Beware of the ready made cinch devices for adjusting rope tension. Some use a ratchet pawl or ball bearing that pinches the rope severely, necking it down and causing a high stress concentration. This greatly reduces breaking strength.

One general rule of thumb for rope is that the 'safe working load'/'SWL', is typically rated at 20% of the breaking strength. This helps allow for shock loads and weakening points at knots.
Logged
WB6BYU
Member

Posts: 16794




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: September 14, 2017, 09:39:24 AM »

I never cinch my guy ropes down tight enough to need a Trucker's hitch.

If you need something better than a tautline / Midshipman's hitch, use a Prusik knot.  Use a short loop of rope,
tie it around the guy rope, and clip the end to the anchor.  (You want a clip or carabiner here because you
need disconnect the loop of rope to untie it.)  Then you can pull the guy rope through the knot until it is
tight enough, and the knot will hold from there.  (You have to take tension off the knot to loosen it, though,
so make sure you have a way to do that.)
Logged
JS6TMW
Member

Posts: 1171




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: September 15, 2017, 06:44:16 AM »

I was thinking about the Trucker's hitch not for the mechanical advantage, but that it can be tied off positively. (I also used to think it was very cool how one of my contractor friends used it while I was making a total mess of my pickup loads.) However, I now see that the midshipman's hitch is very secure with an extra half-hitch or two added.

Steve
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!