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Author Topic: Book - The Telegraph in America  (Read 5779 times)
N6PG
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Posts: 204




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« on: December 26, 2017, 06:47:48 AM »

Has anyone read this book by David Hochfelder? It’s $22.50 on the kindle, so not cheap! But I’m interested...
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SOFAR
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« Reply #1 on: December 26, 2017, 07:18:01 AM »

Has anyone read this book by David Hochfelder? It’s $22.50 on the kindle, so not cheap! But I’m interested...

I have not, but see that it's available at the public library. I've read several books on Thomas Edison, he was responsible for a couple advancements of telegraph communications.
« Last Edit: December 26, 2017, 07:27:33 AM by SOFAR » Logged
N4SRN
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« Reply #2 on: December 26, 2017, 04:40:19 PM »

Lemmeknow - impact on Society through 1930 is pretty historical...

Bret/N4SRN
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Bret/N4SRN
Bedford, NH  USA
WB0OEW
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« Reply #3 on: December 27, 2017, 09:28:54 AM »

Have not read that one but I have read "Mr. Lincoln's T-Mails: How Abraham Lincoln Used the Telegraph to Win the Civil War ". I found it well written and interesting material. $2.99 for Kindle.
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EE specializing in large telescope control systems. Ham interests include building, antennas, digital modes.
W4KYR
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Posts: 1732




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« Reply #4 on: January 02, 2018, 07:37:43 AM »

There are several free books about telegraph's over at archive.org
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K1HMS
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Posts: 487




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« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2018, 09:47:17 AM »

The links here got me to: https://ia802707.us.archive.org/6/items/heroesoftheteleg00979gut/htgrf10.txt

It is  yet another history of the telegraph and to a limted extent the telephone.

The authors try to show how numerous people and events over time culminated in a practical system. It is a bit broader than the typical Morse/Vain centric discription.
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AK0B
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Posts: 305




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« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2018, 12:31:25 PM »

It is a history book.  Non-technical.  over 200 pages of small print.  you will not find a circuit diagram, patent and anything at the technical level.

As a history book I think the writer did a good job. However, I would love to see a book covering the technical problems encounter during the 100 years of being used.

Did you know one of the lines can be broken and still receiver a signal.  The telegraphy line can be shorted and still receive a signal.  The era end by 1980 with the cost of copper being one of the reasons.  A couple of chapters could have devoted to Edison.  However, several great security companies also expand the art of signaling using copper wire between 1880 and 1980.

Many circuits were 130 vdc powered.

Stan ak0b


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W4KYR
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« Reply #7 on: January 19, 2018, 12:54:51 PM »

It is a history book.  Non-technical.  over 200 pages of small print.  you will not find a circuit diagram, patent and anything at the technical level.

As a history book I think the writer did a good job. However, I would love to see a book covering the technical problems encounter during the 100 years of being used.

Did you know one of the lines can be broken and still receiver a signal.  The telegraphy line can be shorted and still receive a signal.  The era end by 1980 with the cost of copper being one of the reasons.  A couple of chapters could have devoted to Edison.  However, several great security companies also expand the art of signaling using copper wire between 1880 and 1980.

Many circuits were 130 vdc powered.

Stan ak0b




I always wondered how did they recharge the batteries? Did they have spares on hand? Or did they just add some more acid to the cells...
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KL7CW
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Posts: 319




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« Reply #8 on: January 20, 2018, 10:17:33 AM »

Go to the "Morse Telegraph Club" web site.  Much info...archived books on line, magazine, articles, for sale items, etc.  It is mostly about Railroad and landline telegraph operation....mostly non technical, but some archived info on circuits, etc. 
   Now I am mostly a technical person, so my favorite telegraph book, which I cannot now locate, was purchased perhaps 10 years ago from one of the reprint companies.  I believe it was a Bell System or possibly Western Union book published possibly around 1910.  It is thick, perhaps 500 to 1000 pages was nicely bound, and covers much technical info on the circuits used in the 1800's.  Included are good explanations of sounders, switchboards, battery plants, etc.  Good diagrams and theory on how duplex, quadra plex, etc. systems worked.  I believe it may have cost something like $25 or $50...not sure, but will keep searching for my book and post info or e mail you if I find more info.  I have bought perhaps a dozen old telegraph sounders on e bay, average cost around $50.  I hook them up to a converter which converts tone Morse on the ham bands to a DC voltage which drives my sounder and all I hear is clicks and clacks.  I found it was very easy for me to copy, and got my 15 WPM code proficiency certificate from ARRL on a sounder soon after I first hooked it up.  For even "more fun", you can learn American Morse....about 1/3 of the letters are different and you have long and short dashes, and different intra element spaces for some letters.....example the letter C is   dot dot small space dot 
      One of the posters mentioned copper wire lines....my understanding was that galvanized iron (or possibly steel ?) was the usual standard back in the old days, and the circuits in the US and Canada were usually one wire circuits which depended upon an earth return path.
   For fun buy an old sounder...something like a 15 to perhaps 150 ohm sounder is easiest to work with to drive with a converter for off the air signals, but lower or higher resistance units are also OK.  If you can get a 4 ohm unit, just hook it up to a key and a 1.5 volt D cell in series.  It will work many (perhaps hundreds) of hours with a single cell.  Other resistance require different voltages. 
    Have fun             Rick  KL7CW   Palmer, Alaska 
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KL7CW
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Posts: 319




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« Reply #9 on: January 20, 2018, 11:14:33 AM »

I just found my copy of the book mentioned in the above post.  The title is "American Telegraphy & Encyclopedia of the Telegraph" by William Maver Jr.
  It was last published by Maver Publishing Company in 1912.  It was reprinted by Lindsay Publications, Inc in Bradley, IL  60915 in 1997.  I probably ordered it on line, but cannot remember any more details.  It is nearly 600 pages, with over 500 illustrations and is nicely bound.  Probably most folks would find the book boring, but I guess I march to a different drummer, and enjoy looking at diagrams and trying to figure out how they did things in the old days.  My copy is not for sale...sorry....this is a keeper.
             Rick  KL7CW
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HAMSTUDY
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Posts: 482




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« Reply #10 on: January 20, 2018, 11:37:07 AM »

Looks like a good book.  Thx

For anyone looking, if you don't mind reprint/reproduction versions there are lots of them available on eBay and Amazon (Amazon seems to have better prices).
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W4KYR
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Posts: 1732




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« Reply #11 on: January 20, 2018, 12:29:19 PM »

I just found my copy of the book mentioned in the above post.  The title is "American Telegraphy & Encyclopedia of the Telegraph" by William Maver Jr.
  It was last published by Maver Publishing Company in 1912.  It was reprinted by Lindsay Publications, Inc in Bradley, IL  60915 in 1997.  I probably ordered it on line, but cannot remember any more details.  It is nearly 600 pages, with over 500 illustrations and is nicely bound.  Probably most folks would find the book boring, but I guess I march to a different drummer, and enjoy looking at diagrams and trying to figure out how they did things in the old days.  My copy is not for sale...sorry....this is a keeper.
             Rick  KL7CW

It can also be found here...

https://archive.org/details/americantelegra01mavegoog

"American telegraphy and encyclopedia of the telegraph; systems, apparatus, operation
by Maver, William, jr. [from old catalog]

Publication date 1909
Topics Telegraph
Publisher New York, Maver publishing company
Collection americana
Digitizing sponsor Google
Book from the collections of New York Public Library
Language English

Book digitized by Google from the library of New York Public Library and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb.
Copyright-region US
Google-id awsZAAAAYAAJ
Identifier americantelegra01mavegoog
Identifier-ark ark:/13960/t60580q6h
Lccn 08036790
Ocr ABBYY FineReader 8.0
Openlibrary_edition OL23412575M
Openlibrary_work OL13810422W
Pages 696
Possible copyright status NOT_IN_COPYRIGHT
Ppi 600
Scandate 20080416
Scanner google
Source http://books.google.com/books?id=awsZAAAAYAAJ&oe=UTF-8
Worldcat 16166296 "

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W0WCA
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Posts: 87




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« Reply #12 on: January 21, 2018, 12:22:36 AM »

The book has three 5 star reviews on Amazon.com.  The price is not exceptionally high but I'd buy the paper version over the Kindle.
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KA0USE
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Posts: 39




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« Reply #13 on: February 03, 2018, 11:32:06 AM »

i'm a paper person, myself.
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