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Author Topic: single-lever vs dual-lever paddles  (Read 18849 times)
KM3K
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Posts: 406




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« on: December 27, 2017, 12:57:53 PM »

Hello,

I'm accepted for the CWops course level#1 that starts up early next month.

At my request, a club-member has loaned me his CT755 single-lever paddle for the course.
I had done some research and it just seemed to me that the dual-lever paddle was too complicated.
Add to that, the comment I had read that the high-speed guys/gals prefer the single-lever because it produced fewer errors; that was a tipping point to me.

But now, since then, I've seen a few YouTube videos and looked at a number of photos; it seems like a dual-lever is the overwhelming "weapon of choice"; I cannot recall seeing any with a single-lever.

So here am I wondering, "Did I make a mis-judgement?"
Any comments are appreciated.
73 Jerry KM3K
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ZL1BBW
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Posts: 1266




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« Reply #1 on: December 27, 2017, 01:12:31 PM »

I have always used a double paddle (DP) for probably the last 40 years.  I have seen people send flawless morse at good speeds on DP keyers.

To get the best out of a DP keyer it does take a degree of practise.

You say about high speed, just what sort of speed are you aiming for?

Cheers   Gavin
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ex MN Radio Officer, Portishead Radio GKA, BT Radio Amateur Morse Tester.  Licensed as G3YCP ZL1DAB, now taken over my father (sk) call as ZL1BBW.
G4LNA
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Posts: 163




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« Reply #2 on: December 27, 2017, 02:01:29 PM »

I think using any sort of key is personal preference.

From my own experience I have used a dual paddle but I find I make far less mistakes with a single paddle then with the dual. Probably because I started over 30 years ago using a single paddle so never really mastered the dual paddle, I tend to use the dual like a single paddle so it's a bit pointless me having a dual paddle.

I think it's less complicated using a single paddle, but requires more finger movement than with the dual, but strangely some say the faster ops tend to use single paddles, which sounds a bit contradictory.

Can you borrow a dual paddle and see how you get on? You might find you haven't made a misjudgement.

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VA3VF
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Posts: 1455




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« Reply #3 on: December 27, 2017, 02:22:49 PM »

Hello,

I'm accepted for the CWops course level#1 that starts up early next month.

At my request, a club-member has loaned me his CT755 single-lever paddle for the course.
I had done some research and it just seemed to me that the dual-lever paddle was too complicated.
Add to that, the comment I had read that the high-speed guys/gals prefer the single-lever because it produced fewer errors; that was a tipping point to me.

But now, since then, I've seen a few YouTube videos and looked at a number of photos; it seems like a dual-lever is the overwhelming "weapon of choice"; I cannot recall seeing any with a single-lever.

So here am I wondering, "Did I make a mis-judgement?"
Any comments are appreciated.
73 Jerry KM3K

I'm not very active on CW these days. Having learned on a single lever paddle, I was never confortable with dual lever paddles. The so called squeeze method, forget about it. Grin

Dual lever paddles seem to be more popular with high speed senders. It's really up to you. My only suggestion is to stay with the one type you learned.

All that said, one can still use dual lever like it's a single lever, but why make things more complicated.
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WY4J
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Posts: 138




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« Reply #4 on: December 27, 2017, 04:57:37 PM »

I own both single and dual paddles and I can't tell the difference. I started 42 years ago with a Heathkit keyer/ paddle which is a tank in comparison to today's keys. Used the Heath until the Bencher came out. Enjoyed the Bencher for 20 years. Now I have 15 different paddles from Brown Brother, to Vibroplex, to Kent, to Begali and both the single and dual paddles by N3ZN. This is just a matter of preference but most of my keys are just pretty as the only two I use on a regular basis are the ones by Tony, N3ZN. They are smooth as glass.

Like a previous person wrote, is not the tool buth the person handling the tool. Takes a bit of practice.
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KE6EE
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Posts: 2008




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« Reply #5 on: December 27, 2017, 05:54:55 PM »

I own both single and dual paddles and I can't tell the difference.

Absolutely. Type of paddle really does not matter and is certainly not critical.

Unless you are determined to learn an iambic style or "squeeze" style of keying.

Which really only adds complexity.

When you get above a certain speed, say about 30 wpm, dual lever paddles set at a miniscule lever throw can become
a real challenge to use properly. That's why most really high speed ops use a single lever.

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W0WCA
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Posts: 87




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« Reply #6 on: December 27, 2017, 05:59:45 PM »

Jerry: for the better part of forty years I was convinced that Dual lever iambic paddles were the last word in sending instruments.  Last onth I purchased a single lever Vibrokeyer and I absolutely love it and will never go back to the dual lever paddles. 
Also, your CT 755 is beautiful!
 
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AA4N
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Posts: 149




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« Reply #7 on: December 27, 2017, 07:35:35 PM »

This subject got pretty thoroughly discussed about 6 months ago.  I think it's on page 5 now.  Look for the thread about "iambic keying, debunking the myth"

73 mike
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KENNETH
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Posts: 105




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« Reply #8 on: December 27, 2017, 07:37:28 PM »

Scott Robbins bought Vibroplex in 2009, in ditdit podcast #13 he talks how a fellow turned him onto a single lever and loves it. https://kx3helper.com makes one too.
« Last Edit: December 27, 2017, 07:40:57 PM by KENNETH » Logged
N9AOP
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Posts: 802




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« Reply #9 on: December 27, 2017, 08:31:33 PM »

I use both but do not do a bug.  I prefer a squeeze key for fast and the single lever for slow.  A touch paddle would be in the middle.
Art
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K8AXW
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Posts: 6756




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« Reply #10 on: December 27, 2017, 10:28:47 PM »

The only difference between dual lever and single lever paddles is that the finger paddles are further apart than a single paddle.

Iambic is another animal and I don't think that's part of this question.

I prefer the single lever paddle because I started using it and going to the dual lever made my fingers further apart and I wasn't used to it.

So, bottom line, it's whatever you are comfortable with. As for speed, I doubt if there is any difference, even with fast code.  Then you'll have to hear from the QRO guys about this.  I never was able to go over 30wpm with anything.
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A Pessimist is Never Disappointed!
K3TN
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Posts: 621


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« Reply #11 on: December 28, 2017, 02:44:42 AM »

My very first paddle was single lever, built into the old Heathkit HD 10keyer - which was a horrible keyer.

When I built the successor HD-1410 it was much better mechanically and had dual levers with Iambic keying - which seemed at the time like the future, kinda like going from AM to SSB.  Years later, when my HF rigs began to have keyers built in, I went with dual lever paddles, most recently a really nice N3ZN one.

In 2010 or so, at the Dayton Hamfest, I tried out a single lever paddle - and realized I was much more comfortable and sent much more error-free code! I bought it, and even sold my dual lever N3ZN and bought a single lever N3ZN. I've never looked back.

Turns out I'm a slapper not a squeezer! It is a personal preference, try both out and go with whichever you feel best with.

73 John K3TN CWOps #245
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John K3TN
KC8Y
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Posts: 509




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« Reply #12 on: December 28, 2017, 06:36:32 AM »

"...both, the SINGLE-lever and the DUAL-lever paddles have two (2) sets of contacts...

but in the SINGLE-lever paddle, the lever is common to both and only one (1)-set of contacts can be closed at a time...
the DUAL-lever paddle has two (2) completely independent sets..."

Book statement:   The CW Geek's Guide to Having Fun with Morse Code,by Dan Romanchik KB6NU
 
I use a single-level paddle: Vibroplex Vibrokeyer for CW; and an outboard keyer, it suits me fine.

Ken KC8Y
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W2OZB
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Posts: 4




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« Reply #13 on: December 28, 2017, 06:58:20 AM »

Having finished CWA Level 1 and starting Level 2 in January, I can chime in with, "where you are, it doesn't really matter".  You have plenty of time to make the "dual/single" paddle decision because it just doesn't matter now.

What really matters is that you learn the code and "put the pencil between your teeth": try to head copy instead of writing things down.  This is FAR more important than the type of paddle.

Funny, I often use a straight key because at my current speed I hang with SKCC guys who can send faster on a straight key than I can send on my paddle anyway!  Besides, I can send faster with my paddle than my straight key, BUT my copy is only as fast as I can run a straight key.  So, here I am.  Eventually I'll be able to copy faster, then paddles make sense.  You have plenty of time....

I've been told the true QRQ guys "favor" a straight paddle over a double paddle.  Well, these guys send at speeds that us mere mortals can only achieve in our dreams.  I've also been told that people can copy faster than they can send on a paddle!!  Wow! They head copy code and send via computer because they can't send fast enough!  That's way into the celestial ether in which my poor brain just "vapor locks".

Enjoy the single paddle. Relax, put the pencil away and listen, start now...... your journey will be fantastic.

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K8AXW
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« Reply #14 on: December 28, 2017, 08:42:10 AM »

8Y:  I stand corrected.  Where I became confused and jumped to conclusions is from the single lever paddle I built that has two finger 'paddles' spaced about an 1/8" apart. 

My Kent is also a "single lever" paddle and the finger paddle is a single thin piece of plastic.....which I prefer.

To me the finger pieces spaced apart makes it more difficult to send code and this is why I felt that it's whatever you first use and get used to.

As for dual lever paddles.....one for dits and one for dahs... it seems to me that it just boils down to more metal doing the same thing.  If this is the same description for iambic...well then I am really messed up in the head!
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