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Author Topic: single-lever vs dual-lever paddles  (Read 19303 times)
KE6EE
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Posts: 2008




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« Reply #15 on: December 28, 2017, 10:02:57 AM »

As for dual lever paddles.....one for dits and one for dahs... it seems to me that it just boils down to more metal doing the same thing.  If this is the same description for iambic...well then I am really messed up in the head!

I have a dual lever bug. Two separate levers. Of course squeezing does no good. Simply more metal?

The dual levers do enhance the function of the bug somewhat: you can switch from dit to dah possibly a bit
earlier than with a single lever bug--before your dits are completed you can be moving to dahs.



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K3STX
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Posts: 1625




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« Reply #16 on: December 28, 2017, 10:58:53 AM »

I suspect most people who own dual-lever paddles actually use them AS IF they were a single-lever: i.e. they just push one way or the other way and never squeeze them (for iambic). I am an iambic keying guy; i bought a Kent single lever because everyone told me I would love it. After a year of trying to love it the key is back in its shipping box.

To each his own. But dual-lever does keep your fingers separated a lot more; if you are really not going to do squeeze keying I don't understand why you would buy a dual-lever.

paul
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VA3VF
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Posts: 1474




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« Reply #17 on: December 28, 2017, 03:43:52 PM »

I suspect most people who own dual-lever paddles actually use them AS IF they were a single-lever: i.e. they just push one way or the other way and never squeeze them (for iambic).

To each his own. But dual-lever does keep your fingers separated a lot more; if you are really not going to do squeeze keying I don't understand why you would buy a dual-lever.

paul

I think you described it perfectly!

The other factor was mentioned by K3TN: "Turns out I'm a slapper not a squeezer!" If that's you, a single lever, or even a cootie key, would be more to your liking.

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K3TN
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« Reply #18 on: December 29, 2017, 03:16:55 AM »

There are also single lever paddles with thicker thumbpieces that are as wide as many iambic/dual lever paddles.

As K3STX points out, you can slap a dual lever paddle and make it act like a single lever. But, I found the feel of a good single lever paddle to be much better for me - lower amount of sending errors. Not a big difference -  I would've stuck with my dual lever if someone wasn't willing to buy it from me and I could justify that as a down payment on the new Begali Simplex Mono!
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John K3TN
KB2HSH
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Posts: 285


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« Reply #19 on: December 29, 2017, 11:07:21 AM »

After 30 years of having my ticket, and using a straight key for MOST of it, I tried a Vibroplex Original Presentation, a Heathkit 5010, a TenTec KR5 (which is an old school single lever)...but the Vibroplex Brass Racer is still the best.  BUT...I use it like a single lever. I think the single lever is easier and affords fewer mistakes, unlike an Iambic. 

YMMV.

de KB2HSH
Grand Island NY
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N3HEE
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« Reply #20 on: January 02, 2018, 06:42:15 AM »

A single lever paddle is the way to go.  It's a mechanically more efficient way of sending code.  Most of my students end up buying and using one by the end of my course and love it.  I've sold dozens of HST's for Begali over the past 4 years.  Begali should be sending me commission checks !  -Joe N3HEE
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Joe
N3HEE
CW Academy Advisor (Level II)
KC1BMD
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« Reply #21 on: January 04, 2018, 03:00:33 PM »

Best thing to do is to try several and decide what you like (borrowing some if possible, so you don't have to purchase and sell so much). I have the CT755 and for the price I am really happy with it. I seem to like the paddle spacing a bit wider, so I asked Yurij to send another paddle and then got spacers and longer screws to attach to the existing one and widen the spacing. Now I like it even more. Some single lever paddles are built with two paddles instead of one and that's what I look for now, for the wider spacing. I also have dual level paddles (again because I like the spacing) but do not use iambic mode (although I might try it in the future). I wire all my keys up as straight keys and don't (currently) use a keyer. Perhaps this is quite uncommon but it's what I like and what feels more comfortable. Bottom line, do what feels good and have fun!
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ZENKI
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Posts: 1516




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« Reply #22 on: January 04, 2018, 06:58:49 PM »

Im in the single lever club.

The big advantage of introducing newbies to the single lever is that there is one less thing to worry about. It then becomes a simple matter of generating the DITS and DAHS without too much thought

The  majority of HST telegraphy competitors use single lever keys. When you look at them they look like very primitive home made devices. I suppose you dont need much sophistication to build a single lever key. I never actually found out who makes these HST keys in Russia because they seem popular in the HST competitions. Although the Begalis are becoming very popular.

A single lever paddle is the way to go.  It's a mechanically more efficient way of sending code.  Most of my students end up buying and using one by the end of my course and love it.  I've sold dozens of HST's for Begali over the past 4 years.  Begali should be sending me commission checks !  -Joe N3HEE
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DL8OV
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« Reply #23 on: January 06, 2018, 10:52:01 AM »

Me? I'm a double lever fan, the first time I sent AR K using a squeeze keyer I was hooked. But, I recognize that there are some single lever users out there, it's like trying to argue which is best, plain chocolate or milk chocolate.

However...........

I have one set of paddles and four straight keys, all of them get used depending on my mood and/or the time of day. Pounding away on a Kent straight key is a lot noisier than fingertip operation of a set of paddles.

Peter DL8OV
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VK3MEG
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Posts: 856




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« Reply #24 on: January 11, 2018, 04:32:45 AM »

i new to cw only been learning for 2-3 years  i learn on a dual lever paddle it helps me send good clean code . up to about  30 -35 wpm but best at around 25 wpm for me. my next key will be a single lever to see how they are and if they help me get through the block i have @ 35 wpm . btw i only send that fast in practice not for qso try the single lever see how you go probably the best place to start . you need to learn the code first thats the fun bit Cheesy
the satisfaction of it becoming automatic and not having think is really rewarding and worth all the practice.
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N4SRN
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Posts: 314




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« Reply #25 on: January 21, 2018, 07:48:34 AM »

A single lever paddle is the way to go.  It's a mechanically more efficient way of sending code.  Most of my students end up buying and using one by the end of my course and love it.  I've sold dozens of HST's for Begali over the past 4 years.  Begali should be sending me commission checks !  -Joe N3HEE

Hi Joe, How true! I sent for a Begali Sculpture Mono last week as, nice as my Begali Signature is,  dual-iambic squeeze is giving me fits! Working towards CWA-2 in April. Bret/N4SRN
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Bret/N4SRN
Bedford, NH  USA
KL7CW
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Posts: 322




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« Reply #26 on: January 21, 2018, 11:09:30 AM »

I have been mostly a CW op since 1954...ham and some commercial service.  Have used all kinds of keys.  Since I own some nice and costly dual level paddles I am just too stubborn to give up on Iambic keying with my dual level paddles.  It has taken much effort to partially master the scheme, but I enjoy the challenge and frustration....but I would never recommend dual lever paddles to "normal" people.  There is no advantage to the dual lever paddle and it is much harder to master than a single lever paddle.  Dual lever Iambic keying just happened to evolve as the standard for most US hams, kind of like how come we drive on the right side of the road.  If you do decide on a single lever paddle (it is your choice) it is important to get a good one since single lever paddles with good action are harder to make than a dual lever paddle.  If you have the funds, I would suggest something as least as good as the Kent key.  Less expensive keys may work OK for you, and more expensive keys look very nice and MIGHT have some slight advantage.  There are probably other mid price keys that are also as good or better, I just mentioned the Kent as an example of a sturdy, reliable mid priced key (single lever, dual, or straight key).  A Kent was my main key for decades until I decided to upgrade to more expensive keys for perhaps a very small performance improvement, but they sure are nice looking...not at all a reasonable move.
              Rick  KL7CW
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AA4OO
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« Reply #27 on: January 22, 2018, 10:15:47 AM »

Your best key is the one you presently have on your desk.

1960 Vibrokeyer next to a 1975'ish Standard Bug



http://hamradioqrp.com
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Lower your Power and Raise your expectations
KC9BNW
Member

Posts: 6




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« Reply #28 on: January 23, 2018, 02:51:33 PM »

Greetings,

I am preparing to learn the code and have been watching this debate with interest.  I know that it is quite expensive, but what do people think of the Begali Sculpture Janus?  It can be used as a single or dual level paddle - good, or gimmick?

Cheers,
Scott (KC9BNW)
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K0UA
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Posts: 2134




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« Reply #29 on: January 23, 2018, 03:07:57 PM »

Greetings,

I am preparing to learn the code and have been watching this debate with interest.  I know that it is quite expensive, but what do people think of the Begali Sculpture Janus?  It can be used as a single or dual level paddle - good, or gimmick?

Cheers,
Scott (KC9BNW)

As far as I know everything Begali makes is top notch.  So I would not be afraid it doesn't do what it says. The question is do you really want to make that investment now?  If so.. I say go for it.
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