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Author Topic: CW, One More Time  (Read 4437 times)
W7KKK
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Posts: 382




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« on: January 02, 2018, 09:34:00 AM »

I learned Morse Code in the Army as a radio operator, 15 groups per minute, random 5 letter/numbers per minute. During my time with the Army we rarely used CW for much of anything but it came in handy after my discharge in 1972 when i decided to take the test for a Novice license in about 1974 or so. I was active for about two years and gave it up for the lack of time. At least at the time I was no rock bound and VFOs were allowed.
I got back into ham radio after forced early retirement in the 1990s.
Since then I think I made about 6 contacts using CW but was I ever rusty as I never really considered myself a competent op anyway.
I have been away from ham for a couple of years with medical problems and just got involved again but this time I think I will give CW another try and see if I can retune my ears.
Listening and practicing my receive abilities and waiting for a basic paddle I have on order to show up in the mail.
Wish me luck.

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AC7CW
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Posts: 1162




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« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2018, 02:07:35 PM »

Good luck with that. Just getting on the air will be the best exercise of all. Search the internet and you'll find a lot of CW activities to put on your calendar. There is little shortage of potential contacts.

I knew CW before I took the Army training. It was interesting to see that all those guys with no interest in CW could all master 15wpm after a few weeks. It doesn't require any special talent or special person if the course is good. I'm trying to recall how many hours a day those classes were?



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Novice 1958, 20WPM Extra now... (and get off my lawn)
KD8OW
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Posts: 9




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« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2018, 06:15:41 PM »

The Navies CW classes were 4 hours in the morning, 4 hours in the afternoon and 2 hours in the evening. This was in the early 60's In Pensacola.

Bill
« Last Edit: January 15, 2018, 06:18:25 PM by KD8OW » Logged
GW3OQK
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Posts: 412




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« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2018, 02:36:14 AM »

I expect the services's sending training was on a straight key, as was mine. First. hours of practice receiving perfect Morse then learning to send in the same error free way. These days some operators have never mastered the paddle, send extra dits and run letters together.

Sounds like you don't need luck KKK, because you are determined.
73, Andrew
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K3TN
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Posts: 621


WWW

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« Reply #4 on: January 16, 2018, 02:44:36 AM »

The CW Operators Club has the volunteer driven CW Academy if you'd like to use some instruction - look here.

73 John K3TN
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John K3TN
W1JKA
Member

Posts: 2100




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« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2018, 05:13:39 AM »

You can do it, I was QRT for 45 years although during that time I would copy CW by ear from the ship's R/O shack in the background but never sent any. When I got relicensed a few years back I stated off at about 5 wpm again and have worked backed up to a comfortable 15 wpm. I work CW QRP-DX only.
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AA4OO
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Posts: 118


WWW

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« Reply #6 on: January 22, 2018, 10:20:05 AM »

I learned Morse Code in the Army as a radio operator,

. . .

Listening and practicing my receive abilities and waiting for a basic paddle I have on order to show up in the mail.
Wish me luck.

You have an interesting call-sign for CW work.  Put plenty of space after sending your call before the final 'K' when calling CQ.
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Lower your Power and Raise your expectations
KA1VF
Member

Posts: 149




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« Reply #7 on: January 22, 2018, 05:03:55 PM »

   I learned Morse code in 1959 for a 5 wpm Novice ticket, then the 13 wpm General ticket,
but after upgrading to the Advanced ticket in 1981, I abandoned the CW bands and focused
my attention on the Phone bands for DXing and Contesting because it was easier Operating.
   At that point in time, I was a 15 wpm to 18 wpm straight keyer, and after abandoning CW
for about a decade, I started straight keying again without skipping a beat as they say.

                            73,
                                 Bob


 
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N3DT
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Posts: 1388




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« Reply #8 on: January 22, 2018, 06:44:18 PM »

I don't think code is something you really forget, you may just be off practice a bit. It will come back, just be sure to use good habits and don't get into bad ones. My worst habit was copying in my head, I can copy fast in my head, but if I have to write or type it, I'm lost. And now I forget fast too.
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KE6EE
Member

Posts: 2008




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« Reply #9 on: January 22, 2018, 07:40:09 PM »

My worst habit was copying in my head, I can copy fast in my head, but if I have to write or type it, I'm lost. And now I forget fast too.

On the CW nets I attend we all do lots of head copy and no one seems to remember details of the conversations.

So head copy works somewhat but you need to make notes on the details.

I have found that after a couple of years of CW nets at about 23 wpm my writing speed has increased so that I can
keep up with the sending.

Yes I do print in block letters at 23 wpm. You can do it too.
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