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Author Topic: QSK? for DX, Contests - All QSO's?  (Read 1428 times)
WB9LUR
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« on: January 10, 2018, 10:25:25 PM »

Back in the old days (1970's) I did not operate QSK at all but now all QSO's are full break in...wondering how many folks are QSK? While I use it all of the time - I find it especially useful with pileups...
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73, Randy / WB9LUR - http://www.CallingDX.com

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M0LEP
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« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2018, 12:57:53 AM »

Some rigs do QSK better than others.

I have my KX3 on full-QSK at all times. My Icom 7300 is also set to full-QSK, but a relay's involved so the timing is a bit slower. My Yaesu FT-450AT also has a clicky relay. I have the timeot set as low as it can go, and it works a partial QSK (usually dropping into Rx between words), not full-QSK. I had my old Icom 706 MkIIG set to partial QSK, as the relay clicking was hideous.
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OZ8AGB
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« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2018, 01:15:27 AM »

Interesting. When I got my FTDX 3000 I noticed it is set to semi QSK from the factory.
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KD8IIC
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« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2018, 01:28:56 AM »

   QSK on full time for sure here! Won't work CW without it. Didn't like it at first but now it's normal.
   I'm always amazed / disappointed at the ops who still do not use it.
 
   It's been standard issue on about any new rig since forever in either full or semi break-in.
   When you are 2x QSK QSO it is way more fluid and a whole lot quicker.
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K3TN
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« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2018, 02:52:14 AM »

I've used QSK (Elecraft K3 and KPA 500) but generally operate more of a "semi QSK" mode - I can hear between letters but not between element (dits/dahs). For me, it is the best balance of distraction and break-in ability and usefulness in pileups.

73 John K3TN
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John K3TN
HB9FXW
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« Reply #5 on: January 11, 2018, 03:18:39 AM »

As I'm a quite new ham still, I find QSK too distracting so I've set my rig to only hear the band between words. My IC7200's relays are quite loud too so it's not the best transceiver for QSK.
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VK3MEG
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« Reply #6 on: January 11, 2018, 04:34:51 AM »

full qsk from the start wont operate any other way .find it very handy in pile ups
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N3HEE
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« Reply #7 on: January 11, 2018, 06:20:07 AM »

Semi break in for high power contesting to save relay in amp.  Also dont want to hear clicking for 48 hours.  Semi break in for high power low band DXing due to amp and receive antenna switch clicking.  QSK for low power contesting, DXing and ragchewing. 
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Joe
N3HEE
CW Academy Advisor (Level II)
GW3OQK
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« Reply #8 on: January 11, 2018, 07:55:23 AM »

QSK at ALL times. Keep the RF gain backed off so the noise does not rise between dits.

People who do not use break-in when answering a CQ, and keep transmitting when the caller answers someone else, are a menace.
73, Andrew

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K0RS
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« Reply #9 on: January 11, 2018, 09:17:46 AM »

QSK always.  Don't know how folks can DX without it, especially for split pileups.

A friend and I used to ragchew full QSK.  If one of us wanted to make a comment on something the other said, we just dropped a "dit" in between words and the other would pause for the comment.  Just like a natural conversation.
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N9AOP
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« Reply #10 on: January 11, 2018, 09:46:03 AM »

I had an elmer tell me that on SSB you have the floor from the time you push the button until you let up on it.  That's why he never used QSK because he felt that until he got done sending the soapbox was his.  What I found out was that as I became faster QSK became very useful.
Art
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KD8IIC
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« Reply #11 on: January 13, 2018, 06:36:16 PM »

  Not sure how one would lose concentration wihen running QSK...
  You are only trying to notice when the other guy keys, usually series of dits, so that you know to stop sending
  and listen, he has something to say.
  Like a lot of things, it's an aquired taste and not for everybody. I can't stand semi-breakin anymore myself.
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AE5X
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Posts: 1063




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« Reply #12 on: January 14, 2018, 05:55:15 AM »

My first rig as a new ham in 1978 was a Ten Tec Century 21 so I started out with QSK as my "normal". When I upgraded to General with phone privileges, I bought an FT-101, which didn't have QSK. Based on where I'd come from and how I'd learned operational CW, I felt like I was partially deaf on CW with the Yaesu. I hated not being able to hear what was going on while I transmitted.

All rigs since the Yaesu have been QSK-capable and I use it as my default mode whenever I'm using CW (which is 90% of the time).
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K3STX
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« Reply #13 on: January 14, 2018, 06:08:35 AM »

I don't like QSK. I find it distracting. To each his own.

paul
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DL8OV
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Posts: 785




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« Reply #14 on: January 14, 2018, 06:41:31 AM »

I run full QSK and it took a L O N G time to get right as my transceiver is a homebrew affair. I can now receive between the dots up to about 20 WPM, after that the CPU switches the timing slightly so that I can only hear between words. The secret(s)?

1) Good QSK is like good comedy, timing is everything.

2) You don't only need to take account of the transmit/receive relay (if fitted) you also need to consider the time taken for the transmit or receive supply to die down to zero, the time taken by the PLL or DDS to switch frequency and then settle, the time taken for a signal to pass through your receiver filters and the time it takes for the sound to travel between the speaker and your ear!

3) When switching from receive to transmit the first thing you need to do is disconnect the L.O. signal to the first mixer. Miss this out and you will get clicks when switching over.

4) Switch the slowest thing first and the fastest thing last, then and only then send a signal through your transmit chain.

Peter DL8OV
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