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Author Topic: Bouvet Island Band Plan has 40M SSB @ 7.082 MHz?  (Read 1165 times)
KD0ZGW
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« on: January 11, 2018, 10:24:04 AM »

Is this a typo?  SSB for American hams starts at 7.125 (actually 7.128).

KD0ZGW
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AB8MA
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« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2018, 10:25:35 AM »

Not uncommon. Split up to a frequency we are allowed to work.
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KD0ZGW
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« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2018, 10:50:29 AM »

thx.  that makes sense.

KD0ZGW
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N1UK
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« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2018, 04:31:15 PM »

It's a good move as it gets them away from some of the NA QRM and they can listen in the NA portion when they want to work NA.


73 Mark N1UK
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N2NL
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« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2018, 05:06:55 PM »

It's a good move as it gets them away from some of the NA QRM and they can listen in the NA portion when they want to work NA.


73 Mark N1UK

One downside, however is that many of these sub-7100 SSB frequencies have the South American equivalent of Pig Farmer nets, either oblivious to or uncaring of any QRM they might be causing to a DXpedition operating there.
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W2LO
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« Reply #5 on: January 11, 2018, 05:32:00 PM »

3Y0Z has wisely chosen a frequency which does not end in 5 or 0 where most of these nets choose to meet.
« Last Edit: January 11, 2018, 05:38:14 PM by W2LO » Logged
N1UK
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« Reply #6 on: January 11, 2018, 05:48:44 PM »

Quote
One downside, however is that many of these sub-7100 SSB frequencies have the South American equivalent of Pig Farmer nets, either oblivious to or uncaring of any QRM they might be causing to a DXpedition operating there.

Yes you are quite right.


Mark N1UK
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N3QE
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Posts: 5026




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« Reply #7 on: January 12, 2018, 05:19:52 AM »

It's a good move as it gets them away from some of the NA QRM and they can listen in the NA portion when they want to work NA.


73 Mark N1UK

One downside, however is that many of these sub-7100 SSB frequencies have the South American equivalent of Pig Farmer nets, either oblivious to or uncaring of any QRM they might be causing to a DXpedition operating there.

7082 is not a bad choice. There's some automatic digital modes that pop up (WINLINK?) in the 7080's, but not nearly as bad as below 7080 or in the 7090's.

The minor domestic RTTY events can try to keep clear of 7080-7082  which would be their mainstay.

RTTY WPX is Feb 10-Feb 11 and will completely saturate everything 7030 to 7100 for that entire weekend. But it's just two days maybe Bouvet can move above 7100 or something that weekend, which will be relatively clear except for the EU SSB and some NA slow speed CW.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2018, 05:31:15 AM by N3QE » Logged
VK3HJ
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« Reply #8 on: January 12, 2018, 05:52:59 AM »

There is a lot of local and regional phone activity on that part of the band.

It won't worry me, as I'll be happy with a CW QSO on 40 m.
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N2RJ
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« Reply #9 on: January 12, 2018, 10:07:34 PM »

It's a good move as it gets them away from some of the NA QRM and they can listen in the NA portion when they want to work NA.


73 Mark N1UK

One downside, however is that many of these sub-7100 SSB frequencies have the South American equivalent of Pig Farmer nets, either oblivious to or uncaring of any QRM they might be causing to a DXpedition operating there.

Not really a big problem. The PF nets are concentrated on one or two frequencies. The Bouvet radios have the ability to QSY, as well as their amps. I tested it myself.
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N2SR
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« Reply #10 on: January 13, 2018, 05:24:04 AM »

3Y0Z has wisely chosen a frequency which does not end in 5 or 0 where most of these nets choose to meet.

But then you'll have someone saying they are "off frequency," because their xmt frequency does not end in a 0 or 5.   Roll Eyes
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If no one is doing it that way, there is a probably a very good reason.
N3QE
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Posts: 5026




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« Reply #11 on: January 13, 2018, 05:35:07 AM »

Not really a big problem. The PF nets are concentrated on one or two frequencies.

They may be transmitting on one or two frequencies at any point in time. But choose any other frequency and ask a couple times if it's in use and you'll get a reply saying it is, it's their frequency (even though they aren't using it).
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N5VYS
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« Reply #12 on: January 13, 2018, 08:00:31 AM »

One 20M Q, any mode will do.Then the happy dance begins!

Obie N5VYS
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K4HB
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Posts: 285




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« Reply #13 on: January 13, 2018, 10:50:46 AM »

Bouvet is the easiest rare one I've ever worked. This was in Jan 2001 when astronaut Chuck Brady was there. I heard him on the air a few times, but the pileup was a zoo with folks calling when he tried to work anyone, and the DQRMers were out in force. One night after midnight local time I was tuning 20 meters and heard him calling CQ loud and clear. Called him once and I was in his log. Heard him work some afterward, but no big pileup.

The next day I had a QSO with a friend in 1 land and he asked if I had heard Bouvet on the air. I told him about working Chuck, and that he was coming on late at night, when most of us in the US are in bed. Heard my friend work him that night, as well as others. Maybe some of those heard our QSO.

Of course during 2001, propagation was much better for 20 meters. We were between the two peaks for Cycle 23, and 20 meters was open late at night. Hope for some new bands/modes, but don't expect it to be anywhere near as easy as it was in 2001. There's a team of highly skilled and seasoned DXpeditioners going there, and I believe many will be happy after it's over.
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N5VYS
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Posts: 1184




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« Reply #14 on: January 13, 2018, 12:32:51 PM »

Bouvet is the easiest rare one I've ever worked. This was in Jan 2001 when astronaut Chuck Brady was there. I heard him on the air a few times, but the pileup was a zoo with folks calling when he tried to work anyone, and the DQRMers were out in force. One night after midnight local time I was tuning 20 meters and heard him calling CQ loud and clear. Called him once and I was in his log. Heard him work some afterward, but no big pileup.

The next day I had a QSO with a friend in 1 land and he asked if I had heard Bouvet on the air. I told him about working Chuck, and that he was coming on late at night, when most of us in the US are in bed. Heard my friend work him that night, as well as others. Maybe some of those heard our QSO.

Of course during 2001, propagation was much better for 20 meters. We were between the two peaks for Cycle 23, and 20 meters was open late at night. Hope for some new bands/modes, but don't expect it to be anywhere near as easy as it was in 2001. There's a team of highly skilled and seasoned DXpeditioners going there, and I believe many will be happy after it's over.
I was there also on 20M SSB.  Sunday afternoon after church services as usual. I got in the mix and started to call.

After a while and in between hecklers Chuck hears me!  He says who's the November 5 Victor, I call again but before we can completed the exchange the children takes over.

Chuck got festered goes QRT again! And that was the end of that story!

Obie N5VYS
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