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Author Topic: FCC Radiotelegraph Operator License  (Read 1864 times)
WB0IXV
Member

Posts: 8




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« on: January 12, 2018, 10:39:17 AM »

I recently took and passed the Written and Morse Code elements for the FCC Radiotelegraph Operator License.
I now hold License #T 97.  Less than 100 have been issued!

I took the exam through the National Radio Examiners, they have test sessions around the U.S.:
http://www.w5yi.org/exam_locations_com.php

For the Radiotelegraph license you need:
Written Elements:
Element 1: Basic radio law and operating practice.
Element 6: Advanced Radiotelegraph
and
Telegraphy Examination Elements:
Element 1 – 16 code groups per minute.
Element 2 – 20 words per minute.

73,
Dave
WBØIXV


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W4KYR
Member

Posts: 1655




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« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2018, 12:26:04 PM »

Congratulations.



Does the license look like this?

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The internet and cellphone networks are great until they go down, what then? Find out here. 
https://www.eham.net/ehamforum/smf/index.php/topic,111948.0.html

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WB9LUR
Member

Posts: 191


WWW

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« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2018, 01:24:39 PM »

I recently took and passed the Written and Morse Code elements for the FCC Radiotelegraph Operator License.
I now hold License #T 97.  Less than 100 have been issued!

I took the exam through the National Radio Examiners, they have test sessions around the U.S.:
http://www.w5yi.org/exam_locations_com.php

For the Radiotelegraph license you need:
Written Elements:
Element 1: Basic radio law and operating practice.
Element 6: Advanced Radiotelegraph
and
Telegraphy Examination Elements:
Element 1 – 16 code groups per minute.
Element 2 – 20 words per minute.

73,
Dave
WBØIXV




Congrats! I only need to take Element 6 - written - everything else is covered by 20WPM Extra and GROL - don't need it for anything - just a cool thing to have...

Randy
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. .

73, Randy / WB9LUR - http://www.CallingDX.com

. .
KENNETH
Member

Posts: 104




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« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2018, 04:49:13 PM »

Amazing Dave thanks for sharing congrats!  There is thread here on page two of the cw threads. A good article posted there too. Do you know how big the question pool is for element 1 and 6? I could not find the answer. I do know the extra class pool is a 712 question pool
« Last Edit: January 12, 2018, 04:56:28 PM by KENNETH » Logged
WB0IXV
Member

Posts: 8




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« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2018, 04:48:07 AM »

The Element 1 Question Pool is 144 questions.
The Element 6 Question Pool is 616 questions.
The questions and official answers (not necessary the correct answers) can be found on the FCC website.
https://www.fcc.gov/wireless/bureau-divisions/mobility-division/commercial-radio-operator-license-program/examinations

The Telegraphy Tests:
T1 - 16 wpm 5 character word groups.  Numbers, punctuation, prosigns count as 2 characters.
       Need at least 80 characters in a row for 1 minute.  It seemed like 16 wpm character speed to me, no Farnsworth.
T2 - 20 wpm plain text. Numbers, punctuation, prosigns count as 2 characters.
       Need at least 100 characters in a row for 1 minute.  Again, seemed like 20 wpm character speed to me, no Farnsworth.
       The copy was a marine weather report.  They gave me a minute or two to clean up my copy, correct spelling, etc.

The actual license looks just like your Amateur Radio license, except instead of AMATEUR RADIO LICENSE is says RADIOTELEGRAPH OPERATOR LICENSE.

Another good source of information I found useful is the Marine Radio Historical Society:
http://members.aceweb.com/royh/
and their comments on Element 6:
http://members.aceweb.com/royh/Element_6_Errata.pdf

Take the test, maybe you can receive license #T100!

73,
Dave
WB0IXV


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KC8Y
Member

Posts: 486




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« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2018, 07:15:04 AM »

I was looking for the FCC website; just what I needed.

Thank you,  73

Ken KC8Y
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KENNETH
Member

Posts: 104




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« Reply #6 on: January 16, 2018, 05:30:35 PM »

Did you have to travel to take your testing? Denver or luck out at a closer place like Boulder?
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SM0AOM
Member

Posts: 196




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« Reply #7 on: January 17, 2018, 12:15:22 PM »

I find it interesting that the FCC still grants a licence which the shipping industry went to large extents to eliminate.

To my knowledge, there are no current employment opportunities in first-world merchant marines or coast stations that require a radiotelegraph certificate/licence.

The exam question pools are also remarkably dated. Both Element 1 and 6 contain technical material that was current in the 50/60s. In comparison, the material that I came across in the mid-70s when I sat the First Class certificate exams during my military service was quite current, and even had questions about SSB and solid-state electronics.

The textbook used was from the late 60s and was written by three Norwegian ship's radio engineers and translated into Swedish. Some additional material was also contained in two, quite thin, compediums.

I could not have been employed as an R/O even having my certificate, as I had not been examined in the administrative and clerical matters that formed the majority of the R/O on-board duties, and also lacked the required sea practice term.

Possible civilian employments may have been as a coast station operator or as a SIGINT intercept operator.

However, it turned out that I became a coast radio and ship's radio engineer after University some years later.

In more recent times, my present employer wanted me to get the GOC so I would be able to conduct radio surveys onboard naval GMDSS vessels.

The GOC study content turned out to be much more applied and practically oriented than the old Radiotelegraph certificate syllabus.
« Last Edit: January 17, 2018, 12:28:32 PM by SM0AOM » Logged
KB4MNG
Member

Posts: 287




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« Reply #8 on: January 18, 2018, 11:17:25 AM »

I have my GROL. Got it back in the 90s when they allowed VEs to administer it. I work for a state agency that certifies radars used in law enforcement vehicles. Believe it or not, the state still requires the techs to have a GROL for employment. Is there any other employments that require the GROL anymore?
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KA4GFY
Member

Posts: 25




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« Reply #9 on: Yesterday at 06:44:19 AM »

You need the GROL to repair marine radios and aircraft radios.  You may also need it to install them as well.

73,
Rich, KA4GFY

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