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Author Topic: antennas  (Read 600 times)
CHARLIE2
Member

Posts: 1




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« on: October 12, 2000, 01:13:52 PM »

Is it possible to operate a 2 meter
transceiver with a random wire antenna?
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WD8DBY
Member

Posts: 29




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2000, 02:02:22 PM »

The easiest two meter and 6 meter for that matter, antenna I ever built was made simply from coax!  Take a standard piece of coax, and separate the shield from the center conductor for the appropriate antenna length for the frequency on which you choose to operate.  You can hang the center conductor using a suction cup on a window and simply let the shield hang down thus creating a "vertical dipole" type of antenna.  I got very respectable SWR and good talking distance with this simple antenna!

Give it a try.

Paul
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WB6BYU
Member

Posts: 13580




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« Reply #2 on: October 24, 2000, 02:26:30 PM »

It certainly is possible, though not common.  The biggest problem
is that there are practially no 2m antenna tuners built commercially.
With some experimentation you can build your own, using any of
a number of methods.  You will have to keep the lead lengths short
to prevent problems with stray inductance.  One possible approach
is to build a quarter wave matching stub - perhaps a 20" length of
parallel conductor line made from bare wire or copper tubing.  With
a sliding short circuit to adjust the length, and variable taping
points for the coax and antenna, you should be able to match just
about any wire length.

One word of caution:  a typical HF "random wire" will be many
wavelengths long at 2m.  The pattern will be quite sharp with many
lobes and nulls, especially if the wire is straight and long.   This
may be an advantage if the lobes are in the desired directions, but
can be a problem if the nulls are in the wrong places.

Good luck!   - Dale  WB6BYU
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