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Author Topic: GUY WIRE,KEVLAR --PHILLYSTRAN NONCONDUCTING GUY CA  (Read 577 times)
KN7O
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Posts: 1




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« on: August 16, 2001, 05:18:46 PM »

KEVLAR---PHILLYSTRAN IS THIS USED COMMERICALY,IS IT USED ON LARGE TOWERS? HAS ANYBODY EVER USED THIS PRODUCT  TO GUY TOWERS? HOW ABOUT SOME FEED BACK.
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« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2001, 08:56:32 PM »

Why don't you just call the company.  You have all ready ans the question youself.   What do you think.

Who would know better than the company.  This is typical of the lack of effort people are putting into THEIR hobby.
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N9KWW
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Posts: 86




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« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2001, 09:26:08 PM »

first off the bat ignore the previous post, if you will not put your name to it, it must be stupid!!
now back to your question, kevlar is used for shipping to tie them up to the docks, and it is high tensil material, but it generaly not used for towers becouse towers are dynamic in nature. they must flex and must be able to have some play. kevlar does not have much play at all, unlike nylon it does not give it just breaks. in addition kevlar does break down with ultraviolet light, in a tower application this is not good. so bottom line, it will work for a temp tower or field day type of use, but not for a back yard full time service type of installation.

hope this helps
ron
n9kww
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AC5E
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« Reply #3 on: August 16, 2001, 09:53:12 PM »

Hi: Actually, Phillystran is used for towers. It is expensive, the last time I looked the total cost is around 3-5 times the cost of steel guys. But installed properly it makes an excellent non conducting guy material. It's a little hard to tune up Phillystran guys though.
   As far as stretch is concerned - how much stretch do you suppose steel guy wires have?
  73  Pete Allen  AC5E
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« Reply #4 on: August 16, 2001, 11:32:28 PM »

See this is just what I mean, and why some people post nameless.

FYI to the question.  CALL the company.  BUT if you must know.  YES this material has been used for both ham and commerical tower work for over 20 years.  It has both good and bad points.  It does cost a lot, and one need to use special connection methods ( but these have gotten easier in the past few years ).

As I said in the first reply:  CALL the company, ask all the questions you want,  then make up your mind.

OR.......  you can listen to people, many who may never of worked with the stuff, and well........

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WB2WIK
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« Reply #5 on: August 17, 2001, 10:58:36 AM »

I've worked with Phillystran for 20+ years, and it's great stuff.  Of course it's used for supporting towers, that's one of its primary intended applications.  The coating on Phillystran is UV resistant, the Kevlar strands are inside.  My very first installation using Phillystran was on a 140' communications tower in NY state, and the tower's still there, with the same guys, after 21 years.

Drawbacks are cost (high!) and that to cut and terminate requires special, unique tooling that you pretty much have to buy from the manufacturer.  The cut ends get "potted" as the termination process, and if you don't follow this process, I have no idea what the results might be -- probably not very good.  Phillystran does stretch a bit, but not seemingly more than standard stranded steel guy wire of similar gauge.  The use of prescribed turnbuckles to take up the slack is more than sufficient.

Advantages are weight (less than steel), flexibility (better than steel -- in fact, similar to rope), and that non-conductive guys allow one to side-mount antennas on tall towers without impacting radiation patterns.  In fact, that last advantage is the only reason I can think of for using Phillystran -- and it's a good reason.

73 de Steve WB2WIK/6
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RobertKoernerExAE7G
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« Reply #6 on: August 18, 2001, 09:23:42 AM »

"Who would know better than the company. This is typical of the lack of effort people are putting into THEIR hobby."

I've always thought asking fellow hams about their experience with a certain product is part of a good game plan to collect information.

One of the first things I asked a ham I met, when I moved here to Tucson, was if the sunlight would break down the Phillystran cable on his tower (we are fortunate to have a lot of wonderful sunlight here).

If he had replied that I should call the company, I would have been shocked.
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AC5UP
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Posts: 3825




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« Reply #7 on: August 18, 2001, 11:08:38 PM »

Not only is Phillystran the prefered guy material for towers that act as vertical radiators, but it confuses the hell out of Amateurs... What a combo! For the person who claimed "it doesn't stretch, it breaks" I can't help but wonder why it's used in bulletproof vests and body armor. Surely that would prove good tensile strength and tolerance of shock loads, ya' think?

The only drawbacks are the cost and that you should use steel guys for the last 15' or so at the ground end if there's any chance of a grass fire. The new style end clamps are easy to work with.
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