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Author Topic: Stealth Loop Antenna Support  (Read 370 times)
K3WVU
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Posts: 491




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« on: May 29, 2002, 12:09:29 PM »

I'm thinking about putting up a loop around the roof to improve my low frequency performance, but since I have aluminum raingutters, I thought I'd put it slightly above the roofline (2-3") to avoid them.  Does anyone have any ideas of how best to support the wire?  I've looked at the standard standoff insulators, but they're mostly metal and could cause a problem.  I'm using 14ga black insulated wire.

Thanks.

Dwight K3WVU
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AA3YV
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Posts: 16




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« Reply #1 on: May 29, 2002, 12:21:33 PM »

May be the plastic clips used to hang christmas lights will work? They will provide only about 1 inch separation though.
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20666




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« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2002, 01:14:12 PM »

I wouldn't bother with the insulators.  

Reasons:

-Unless you use a LOT of insulators, like one every foot or so, the wire is likely to droop and touch the roof material between the support points, anyway.

-A few inches, on the HF bands, is about equivalent to no separation at all.  Let's see...on 40m, 4" is two one-thousandths (.002) wavelengths.  That's pretty much the same as "no" wavelengths.

-Since you're using insulated wire, you won't be electrically contacting the roofing or the gutters.

The aluminum gutters will couple to your antenna, for sure, and change its resonance.  However, you may as well accept that, since the coupling will be about the same if the spacing is "nothing" or "four inches," it's about the same thing for RF at such low frequencies, when the materials parallel for a long distance.  That won't necessarily detract from the way the loop works, but will likely change (usually lower) the loop resonance.  Not a big deal, especially if you feed with ladder line and use a tuner.

WB2WIK/6
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WB6BYU
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Posts: 13580




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« Reply #3 on: May 29, 2002, 04:11:50 PM »

I just use insulated wire and tuck the wire under the bottom edges
of the roof shingles.  This works best with wood shingles, but I've
done it with composition ones as well.  But nowadays I would just
get up on a ladder and staple the wire to the back side of the
fascia board that runs around the edge of the roof (where it is
sheltered from the weather.)  I don't think the rain gutter will hurt
anything.
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W0FM
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Posts: 2057




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« Reply #4 on: May 30, 2002, 10:25:27 AM »

My fascia boards are aluminum covered to match the guttering, so I can't attach a loop to the fascia either.  The approach that has worked best for me is to lay the black insulated loop wire directly on the roof shingles and tack it down with a dab of colored silicone sealant about every foot or two. (Use wire and sealant to match your roof.  In my case, I used black wire and sealant to match the shingles) Holds great in any weather, and the antenna virtually disappears.  Good luck.

Terry, WØFM
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KF4ZGZ
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Posts: 289


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« Reply #5 on: June 03, 2002, 07:33:46 AM »

Why not electrically connect the gutters and just use them. Attach the wire to the top edge of the at each end at the corners of the house with wire, feed it in the middle of one of the wire sections at the end of the house with a tuner. If anyone asks.....lightening protection!
 good luck and 73, de Matt, KF4ZGZ
" The best antenna is the one you build yourself!"
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