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Author Topic: QTH best roof mount vertical. What works?  (Read 306 times)
KG6MEG
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Posts: 29




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« on: September 18, 2002, 08:45:54 PM »

I have the facilities to set up a vert. ant. Base will be about 30' up. I am a new HAM and I want to set up the best no-guywire antenna for DX. My only other alternatives would be eave mounted dipoles or random wires. I'd love to just experiment, but I am slighly impaired and would like to minimize my time on the roof, its steep...

What are your recommendations for an HF vert. considering the above. I also have min. area for Horizontal ground rods, about 12' max radius. I would like to avoid high wind loading. I am willing to give this a shot, hopefully the neighbors won't freak out...


73 Mike
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KZ1X
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Posts: 3228




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« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2002, 09:17:58 PM »

HyGain DX-77 or one of the Force12 verticals
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K4KMG
Member

Posts: 16




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« Reply #2 on: September 18, 2002, 10:46:25 PM »

Mike, I have been using a GAP Titan for about 1.5 years. I can't give you a fancy explanation as to why it works, but it does work GREAT! I can talk just about anywhere. No radials necessary, and I have seen several with no guy wires. I do have the space for guys, so I do use them. I live in hurricane country!
73
Good Luck
Tom F
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N6AJR
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Posts: 9912




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« Reply #3 on: September 19, 2002, 02:14:49 AM »

I would use the Hustler 5 btv ( 5 band verticle) and you can either ground mount it on a 4 foot pipe pounded 2 1/2 feet into the ground ( mine is that way and it works very well with no radials ) or on a 10 foot pipe with some short radials or on the roof with 4 short radials.  the radials are attached to the bottom of the antenna and go out in 4 directions about 30 feet (or less) as a ground plane.  This can be laid right on the roof.  This antenna  and its 2 cousins are really inexpensive, and work well, and are easy to adjust.  I can roof mount or pole mount mine but I chose to ground mount it as I too am slightly impaired.  I can raise and lower it by my self for the ocassional tune as my interest ( and frequencies) change.  the 4 band   10- 40 meters is $ 139  the 5 band   10-80 is $159 and the 6 band  10-80 = 30 meters  is $189.  these can be used on the warc bands with a tuner.. I love  mine and use it as my main antenna.  tom N6AJR
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AC5E
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Posts: 3585




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« Reply #4 on: September 19, 2002, 07:18:12 AM »

Hi: There are certainly plenty of possibilities. I worked well over 100 countries in less than 90 days with a Cushcraft R5, and the R8 includes 30 and part of 40 Meters. If you have an adequate "stack" to tie to there are several other options.

The Hustler and Butternut verticals are excellent, especially for DX.

I talk to many hams who are quite satisfied with GAP's, and I have been using a GAP Voyager for 160-20 Meters for almost 10 years.

 
73  Pete Allen  AC5E
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K0RS
Member

Posts: 752




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« Reply #5 on: September 21, 2002, 01:24:00 AM »

A Butternut, like the HF-9 or HF-6 are great performing antennas... BUT they require resonant radials when installed above ground level...like on your roof.  An antenna like this will normally run circles, performance wise,  around the ground independant types...like the Cushcraft R7, R8, or R7000.  The ground independant designs are sometimes called half wave verticals, but in reality they are off-center fed, vertically mounted, trapped dipoles.  There are too many many compromises built into these antennas for the sake of convenience to allow them to be highly efficient radiators.  They are however very easy to erect and install and normally give you a number of bands.  The trade-off is yours to make.  What is most important to you, ease of installation or squeezing out the last bit of performance?  If you decide to go the Butternut or Hustler route, normally a couple of quarter wave radials for each band you want operate is sufficient, IF the antenna is roof mounted.  Many more would be needed on a ground mounted installation, but they would not necessarily need to be resonant then.  For a definitve discussion of radials, check out:

http://www.bencher.com/pdf_download.html

Scroll down to "Dirty little secrets."

All verticals are NOT created equal!
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