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Author Topic: Contacting Antarctica ... help !  (Read 416 times)
VA2DV
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Posts: 138




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« on: February 28, 2003, 05:32:21 PM »

Hi everyone !
I have contacted a couple of stations in about
every part of the world except for the Antarctica.
I have check out religiously with my DX monitoring program and i have compute some predictions from W6EL program.Can someone help me with some possible frequency and ideal time for "hunting" ? I only use SSB and i am limited to 10-12-15-17-20 for DX.I live in the province of Quebec (about the same conditions as New England).Any info will be greatly appreciated.Ive been looking for that part of the world for a long time...
Thanks to all !
Dave VA2DV (sunday afternoon DX'er...)
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K6QP
Member

Posts: 10




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« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2003, 06:32:21 PM »

KC4AAC is often active on about 14.240. They are in Palmer Station. Keep an eye on the DX spots here on E-Ham for them and others. Their signal is usually quite good so you should be able to get them sooner or later. Also keep checking the ARRL DX news which is posted here on E-ham as well. Good Luck!!!
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KF4HEY
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Posts: 172




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« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2003, 06:40:17 PM »

Dave,

I had a Hellschreiber contact with Bruce N0NHP at McMurdo Station, Ross Island, Ant. in May 2000.  I think he returned there on another assignment last year.  Contact him via http://www.gmra.org/n0nhp/antarctica/index.htm and set up a sked.

73, Mike KF4HEY
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W7WIK
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Posts: 89




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« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2003, 01:02:13 AM »

With CW I work Antarctica regurlarly with simple antennas.  Maybe you should give CW a try?
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73,
Marco, AA5ET
AC5UP
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Posts: 3956




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« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2003, 04:02:57 PM »

14.243 MHz is the default frequency for stations in the Antarctic and where they tend to run their regional traffic. It's also your best bet for a monitoring frequency. I've worked KC4AAA (South Pole) and KC4USV (McMurdo) with 100 watts into a wire, SSB, and in the case of 'USV it was almost exactly a year ago and he called me! (I was working the Oklahoma QSO Party, which starts March 22nd this year, and yes, you're all invited...)

In both cases the Q's were mid-evening local time and if my experience is typical, it has far more to do with band condx than your rig. Ain't no big station here, but it do work...

- AC5UP
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KE6ZYK
Member

Posts: 2




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« Reply #5 on: March 07, 2003, 12:16:48 AM »

I'm currently wintering in Antarctica at Mcmurdo Station. You can usually find me at 14243 on my sunday afternoon, saturday evening in the States. The times vary with propagation but often around 0200z to 0300z the east coast of the US begins to come in. Over the next several hours the east coast drops off and the west coast gradually begins to come in. Right about time I have to leave for dinner the signals begin to bounce across the north pole into Europe and Russia.
Bear in mind that I have been at the pointy end of the pileups for many years now and I no longer enjoy endless signal reports. Rather I try to have a short conversation with everyone and answer Antarctica questions before moving on. It keeps it interesting to everyone listening and maintains my sanity.
Hope to hear you soon
mike
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