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Author Topic: Theory of the Ringo Ranger II AR2B  (Read 306 times)
VA3RRR
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Posts: 40




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« on: April 03, 2003, 08:53:10 PM »

I understand the concept of collinear stacking but I do not understand the theory of the coax from the tuning ring down to the radial system. I have had good and bad luck tuning this antenna and found that it works just as good with the main coax fed to the tuning ring without the radial system at all. I asume this antenna is just two half wave stacked because the coax portion does not radiate?

RY
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K0HZI
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Posts: 470




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« Reply #1 on: April 03, 2003, 09:11:28 PM »

Check the WB0W site: http://www.wb0w.com/cushcraft/ringoII.htm
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KA5S
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Posts: 229




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« Reply #2 on: April 03, 2003, 09:45:09 PM »

The previous version of the Ringo Ranger does not use those radials. However, there is RF current flowing on the mast below the feedpoint, and by being careful with the coax, and putting radials at the right place on the mast, that current can be made to radiate where you want it to go, not in a random direction. This is why teh Ranger II is shown having highger gain than the older Ranger.

Cortland
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20543




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« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2003, 11:29:58 AM »

"Good and bad luck tuning this antenna?"  Wonder what that means?

If you set the radiating elements (lower section and upper section, below and above the stub midway up the antenna) to the prescribed lengths per the instructions, the only thing to "tune" is the tap on the ring, which is the impedance matching adjustment.  It's very critical, but once set, provides a perfect match to 50 Ohm coaxial cable -- I've installed a lot of these and never had a problem achieving a 1.0 VSWR in about 30 seconds.

As for working the same with or without the radials, I doubt that.  It should *match* and *tune* the same, or approximately the same, but it doesn't *work* the same -- the angle of radiation when using the decoupling network formed by the extra length of coaxial cable and radials is lower, providing greater gain at the horizon, and usually far better results (on the air signals from farther distances).

WB2WIK/6

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