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Author Topic: Indoor antenna  (Read 288 times)
KE4IZA
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Posts: 240




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« on: May 15, 2003, 09:11:02 PM »



           At the present time I am using an indoor dipole made of wire connected to a 1:1 balun.  I have a 10m dipole down my hall way.  I have 12' of space on each side for wire in a straight line.  20m requires 17.62' on each side.  To do this I will have to run the wire around the corner on each side and the shape will be different on each side.  Does this matter the wire is not straight and the sides are different shapes?

KE4IZA
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« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2003, 09:27:45 PM »

Just try it. Then you will know.
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AD5KL
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« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2003, 09:36:34 PM »

Shouldn't matter.  I've done it.  Just be sure the wire doesn't cross itself, and note any wiring inside the walls of your hallway may skew SWR.  At any rate, make sure your SWR is at the lowest you can get it and you should be ok.

I wouldn't run much power if it's going to be that close either.

You may want to get 2 hamsticks and use those as a dipole, or better yet get that dipole up in the attic.  

Or run the side of the dipole connected to the center of the coax out a window (supported at the end,) and the side with the shield (counterpoise) can be tacked along the base board of your shack or outside the house - again lower power to cut excess RF in the shack.
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K1RDD
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« Reply #3 on: May 16, 2003, 08:03:50 AM »

I'm running a similar set up in my attic, with 10/15/20 all from the same feed point. One note to remember, once you have the 20m up, it may change the reasonance of the 10m due to their proximity. Gotta love indoor antennas! Good luck.

--... ...--
Doug
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W0FM
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« Reply #4 on: May 16, 2003, 10:06:22 AM »

Yes, the legs of a dipole can be run in different directions when lack of sufficient space hinders the installation.  There are a number of examples of bent up dipoles in the Handbook.  You can even let the extra wire on the ends hang straight down providing that it doesn't pose a threat to people nearby.

I have dipoles in the attic that bend and turn to fit the space available and they work pretty well.

Grab a copy of the Handbook and you will see that, (other that crossing itself or folding it back on itself) there are a number of acceptable alternatives to erecting a straight dipole.

Have fun,

Terry, WØFM
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AG4DG
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« Reply #5 on: May 16, 2003, 11:45:37 AM »

Have you considered a loop antenna?  A full-wavelength loop is just 1/4 wavelength on each side when in a square configuration.  A half-wavelength loop is just 1/8 wavelength on each side.
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RobertKoernerExAE7G
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« Reply #6 on: May 16, 2003, 10:18:38 PM »

You can experiment with making a coil also if you want to keep the antenna straight.

Have FUN

And CONGRATS on making your own!
Bob
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