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Author Topic: What antenna to use  (Read 204 times)
NX1G
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Posts: 6




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« on: June 18, 2003, 07:21:45 PM »

If you wanted to work 6-80 meter SSB and could put up no towers and had only medium height trees at 45-50'. What would you fellow hams recomend for the best bang for an antenna. Thanks, Steve, NX1G
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N6AJR
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« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2003, 07:39:01 PM »

I reccommend a multiband dipole also called a fan antenna.  do an elmers search on fan antenna  here on eham
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AD7DB
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« Reply #2 on: June 18, 2003, 09:35:01 PM »

How far apart are those trees, what kind of layout? Because if you can put up a horizontal loop, aka "Loop Skywire" with 4 sides about 70 feet apart, or nearly any polygon encompassing as much area as possible with a perimeter of around 280 feet, then you'd have a great NVIS antenna for 80m and 40, and good angles for working DX on 20-10; and it would also work on 6m. Feed 450 ohm twinlead into an antenna tuner with balanced output, and you'd do mighty fine there.

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W2AEW
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« Reply #3 on: June 20, 2003, 12:43:20 PM »

If the trees don't allow you to put up a loop like the previous post, you could try the ole' 1930's "all-band" dipole style antenna.  135' overall length, center-fed with 450 line to a balanced tuner.  I built mine for about $20 and it works very well.  Good for mostly local stuff on 80. 40 and up it works better and better.  By luck, mine is resonant on 17m (wierd), I put the tuner in bypass and just use the built-in balun.  It's a compromise antenna, but cheap, easy and quick.

I have a friend that uses a commercially available antenna called a "spider-cone".  Its a form of a fan-dipole that looks like a bowtie when viewed from the sky.  He's very happy with it.

Get yourself a spool of wire from Home Depot or Lowes, throw some wires in the trees and experiment.  Everyone's property is different, so there is no one "best" antenna for every situation.
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