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Author Topic: Elmers  (Read 313 times)
N9KZN
Member

Posts: 3




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« on: October 05, 2003, 01:27:33 AM »

Is there a way to identify an analog ham transmitter (any ham band) with an ID schema?
It’s rumored that there is test equipment that will identify such an analog transmitter.

It’s understood that one needs to identify per the rules, as the FCC requires.
Is there is an imbedded ID scheme within an analog transceiver?
Self-built kits, as I recall don’t not have identities, how about manufactures?

The reason for asking, a local ham is claiming that he can identify an offending
transceiver for not  properly providing an ID as required.

It would be nice, but who’s charged in tracking ownership of transmission equipment.  A recorded audio signature may be useful in identifying an offender. A foxhunt is an alternative to find an offender. As always with interference one should file an interference report with their local repeater operator or FCC. Providing the time, date and frequency. If possible, listen to the input frequency on a repeater for more direct information.
--
de n9kzn@ hotmail.com
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K0BG
Member

Posts: 9879


WWW

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« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2003, 10:07:58 AM »

In the past, there has been several requests asking the FCC to "imbed" serial number and/or calls into amateur gear. It should be obvious why this idea stinks.

With modern, computer controlled gear, the FCC can pinpoint anyone they care to. A quick read of the enforcement letters posted on the ARRL web site will attest to that.

Alan, KØBG
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WA4MJF
Member

Posts: 1003




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« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2003, 11:34:20 AM »

You can ID a transmission from a particular
transmitter.  The non-technical name is
"fingerprinting".  You record the characteristics
of the transmitter and when the person IDs
and the prints match you know who it is.

The FCC, CAP and others do this all the time
to catch folks operating illegally.

Of course, the offender has to ID at one time
or another, for this to work.  Often, you have a good
idea who it is and you "fingerprint" a known transmission
and then start "fingerprinting" the offending transmissions.

This has nothing to do with any ID  in the transmitter
itself, other that the unique charateristics of its signal.

73 de Ronnie
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WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20611




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« Reply #3 on: October 06, 2003, 11:32:59 AM »

The "fingerprinting" only works on transmitters which initially key a full-power carrier, such as an FM transmitter.  It doesn't work for SSB signals.

The initial post didn't say anything about mode; but "fingerprinting" FM rigs is a pretty old and very available technology which works most of the time.  The process doesn't involve anything special about the transmitter, it involves careful monitoring of the transmitter's key-up "signature."

WB2WIK/6
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