Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Hook-Up  (Read 879 times)
KA3JOI
Member

Posts: 19




Ignore
« on: July 06, 2009, 11:51:52 AM »

Hi all:
   I'm trying to hook-up my Kenwood TS850s to a SB-200 amp and also using an AMPKEYER. Thanks.

Paul, KA3JOI
pgondos@hotmail.com
Logged
K4DPK
Member

Posts: 1077


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #1 on: July 07, 2009, 05:14:35 PM »

Good for you!

Phil C. Sr.
k4dpk
Logged
KB9CRY
Member

Posts: 4283


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2009, 06:45:33 PM »

Use Coax!
Logged
K4DPK
Member

Posts: 1077


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2009, 06:50:29 PM »

Seriously, if you need help or have a question, you should ask it.

We have no idea what you need.

Phil C. Sr.
k4dpk
Logged
W7ETA
Member

Posts: 2527




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: July 09, 2009, 03:21:27 AM »

Dr OM

I had look up what an ampkey is.

My guess is that you need to make a cable to go from your rig into the ampkey and then run a cable from your ampkey to your amp.

I didn't feel like running a scan to look up what type of a connector your rig uses to key an amp; same for looking up your SB200.

Post more info and somebody will get you going.

73
Bob
Logged
W5DQ
Member

Posts: 1209


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #5 on: July 09, 2009, 10:07:16 AM »

No disrespect intended to anyone that requests help or assistance, but I have started to notice that there are more and more requests for assitance in doing basic station configuration and cabling than was seen many years ago.

With the plethora of information on the internet, finding information on how to hook up this and that is usually readily available if you're serious about finding it. No it isn't just going to magically appear on your browser but with all the search engines available, you can get the majority of any information you need on any topic. Years ago hams had to maintain their own library of handbooks and texts to refer to. The internet is a Godsend to ham radio in this regard.

I see this 'problem' as people get into the hobby and want to setup a station with lots of whizbang this and that options along with a amplifier, etc. They have the money to buy the equipment but not the experience to connect it all together. And in some cases, could be they are just downright lazy.

Not pointing a finger at the OP here, but almost daily you can find a request for 'how do I hookup my transciever to an amplifier' on any of the ham related forum sites. If folks would do their due diligence first, I would guess to say that probably 80% or more of their questions would be answered. However, if the amplifer didn't come with a 'plug and play' cable and instructions that state plug in connector #1 into socket A, etc, etc, they are at a loss of what to do.

I am no genius but I know how to find the answers I need by searching the internet and other venues. My opinion on these sort of assistance requests is "If someone can't figure out how to do it themselves, maybe they should ask themselves if they should be trying to do it in the first place".

If someone does not know how to solder and needs a custom built cable, maybe they should learn to solder first and then they can use their new skill to make all the cables they will ever need. I learned to solder as a teenager and make all my own cables from scratch. Although I passed a NASA certified soldering course at my first job out of college, that isn't required to make any cable needed to connect ham radio gear.

Again, I mean no disrespect to anyone asking for assistance but rather want to plant the seed of discovery so that they can possibly learn and succeed in their project with little assistance.  

Now having said all that I am happy to provide assistance to anyone requesting it if I have the information at hand but I won't go and do research for someone else to use if I have no personal need for it.

Gene W5DQ
Logged

Gene W5DQ
Ridgecrest, CA - DM15dp
www.radioroom.org
N2EY
Member

Posts: 3908




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2009, 10:23:38 AM »

To W5DQ:

I think one of the problems is that most consumer electronics doesn't require as much know how as ham gear.

Take a desktop computer for example. You put the computer, monitor, keyboard, mouse and printer on the desk. They all use the same kind of power cable, so you just plug them into a power strip. The mouse and keyboard have plugs that go into labeled sockets. The DB15 video cable is unique, so you can't get it wrong. A parallel printer cable has a unique cable too, as do the RJ-45 Ethernet cables. Newer stuff is mostly USB, so you just plug everything into USB sockets. A lot of stuff will be recognized and auto-installed by the OS, and what isn't comes with a disk that walks you through installation.

Now look at an HF ham rig.

There's usually a separate power supply, and the 12 volt connectors aren't standardized.

UHF connectors for RF are pretty universal, but they're used for *everything* RF - input, output, antenna, etc.

Some amps have the T/R system built-in, some don't. The control and ALC connectors and levels aren't standardized. In some cases, trying to use Rig A to control Amp B will damage Rig A because its solidstate amplifier keying output isn't up to keying the relays in Amp B.

On top of all that, there's almost never an installation CD nor an auto-configure feature.

None of this is a new ham's fault; it's just the way things are.

73 de Jim, N2EY
Logged
W3LK
Member

Posts: 5639




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: July 09, 2009, 11:54:14 AM »

And some people simply don't bother to read the manuals for the equipment they own.

73,

Lon - W3LK
Naugatuck, Connecticut
Logged

A smoking section in a restaurant makes as much sense as a peeing section in a swimming pool.
W5DQ
Member

Posts: 1209


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #8 on: July 09, 2009, 02:34:02 PM »

Jim N2EY writes "I think one of the problems is that most consumer electronics doesn't require as much know how as ham gear...... None of this is a new ham's fault; it's just the way things are.
"

I agree it isn't anyone 'fault'. I'm (and I suppose like most here) not pointing fingers but simply emphasizing a point that it seems the more new folks we get into ham radio who have little to no experience, I'm seeing more of these 'tell me exactly what to do' requests. That, in my humble opinion, is NOT what amateur radio is supposed to be about. Being a licensed ham should indicate some things about that person, namely:

1) they are interested in technical things (i.e. a technically based hobby) so they are willing to learn the technical stuff about the hobby
2) they are have intelligence enough to pass a test for a license (albeit anymore it is more of an ability to memorize than learn for most), so this shows they can read and write
3) if they post on eHAM or other forums, they have access to the internet and thus should (can't think where they would not) have access to eHAM, QRZ, AC6V.COM, search engines like Google & Bing, etc.

Every piece of gear does come with manuals. Maybe not the best manuals, but combining the manuals with other sources and searching thru forums before asking the same question for the umpteenth time would really show initiative on the requesters part. If they can't find the information (again I'm hard pressed to think of an instance where the basic information could not be found and executed to a point of where maybe something doesn't work), then I guess that's when they should ask. This process is called learning and it sometimes appears to be a dying art in our schools, thus our culture.

Like I posted before, I am no genius, just a typical guy who went to school, learned about electronics, computers, engineering, etc and I like to tinker, build, experiment, operate my radios and help out newbies provided they are first willing to help themselves. I find I very rarely have to go outside of the internet to get the info on any issue or problem I run across so I feel the same 'rules' should be applied to those with little or no experience in ham radio. How else are they going to learn unless challenged a little bit.

To ask the most basic questions really indicates to me (at least) that the requestor has not even tried to figure out anything for themselves and wants someone to spoon feed them the information and process, step by step. So what happens, say 2 months after it is all together and something doesn't work. Do they come back to the group for another dose of info? When I used to work on real technical things years ago before becoming a paper pusher, I got paid a nice salary to do custom turnkey systems for individuals who wanted to walk in, sit down and use the system. No technical experience required. Maybe this is what ham radio has become or is becoming, but it isn't my ham radio. I was Elmered to try first, ask second. learn from my mistakes and get better at doing it the first time round. Like you stated, the basic home PC is all standardized and most people can put that together without even reading the docs. This shows to me they have intuition about things and that is the first step towards learning. being able to recognize information, process it and retain it for later recall.

I'll get off my soap box before I start getting flamed by someone who thinks I am picking directly on them (which is not the reason for my comments).

73 to all,

Gene W5DQ
Logged

Gene W5DQ
Ridgecrest, CA - DM15dp
www.radioroom.org
W7ETA
Member

Posts: 2527




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: July 09, 2009, 04:38:29 PM »

I couldn't get into the BAMA site for SB200 info.

It took a while going thru boxes here, but I found an SB220 manual, along with my college degree.  The Sb220 has RCA intputs for antenna relay and ALC.

Your Amp key also has RCA in and outputs.  So Rca cables from your Ampkey into your SB200.

Course PL259 cable from you rig into the Sb200.

I couldn't come up with what connectors you need for the ALC and antenna relay in your rig.  The only schematic, owners manual charged to download it.

My TS950S uses a DIN connector.  My guess is that I got the DIN connector and soldered up the cable I'm using--might have even been the same cable that I used for the rig before it, a TS930 that I bought new.

Since the whole idea of getting the amprelay is to not damage your rig, and the owners manual doesn't seem to cover the connections, I don't blame you for double checking.

73
Bob
Logged
W5DQ
Member

Posts: 1209


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #10 on: July 09, 2009, 05:03:10 PM »

W7ETA writes "I couldn't get into the BAMA site for SB200 info"

For what it is worth, you won't find any Heathkit manuals on BAMA anymore nor many places on the internet. Recently, the copyright protection on Heathkit documents was exercised across the internet by a new owner of the Heath brand and most sources have been told to pull access to the docs. It is a shame that old Heath gear is now being singled out just so someone can make a few bucks selling copies of the old docs.

Gene W5DQ
Logged

Gene W5DQ
Ridgecrest, CA - DM15dp
www.radioroom.org
W5DQ
Member

Posts: 1209


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #11 on: July 09, 2009, 05:03:24 PM »

W7ETA writes "I couldn't get into the BAMA site for SB200 info"

For what it is worth, you won't find any Heathkit manuals on BAMA anymore nor many places on the internet. Recently, the copyright protection on Heathkit documents was exercised across the internet by a new owner of the Heath brand and most sources have been told to pull access to the docs. It is a shame that old Heath gear is now being singled out just so someone can make a few bucks selling copies of the old docs.

Gene W5DQ
Logged

Gene W5DQ
Ridgecrest, CA - DM15dp
www.radioroom.org
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!