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Author Topic: B P L INFO  (Read 451 times)
WD8QYF
Member

Posts: 1




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« on: April 14, 2004, 10:37:51 AM »

I WOULD LIKE TO KNOW IF ANY MFGR. IS
WORKING ON A FILTER
FOR B P L?

WD8QYF
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KB1GMX
Member

Posts: 787




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« Reply #1 on: April 14, 2004, 11:08:01 AM »

Sarcasm alert...

Obviously you dont understand how radios work.

On a less caustic note.  The problem of BPL is it's a series of data streams modulating a transmitter(s).  Think of it as many transmitters changing frequency at a very fast rate.  The only filter for that is turn off the radio or go to a very different range of frequencies that are far enough removed to avoid the harmonics of that as well.

For a sample of it can be, take a AM pocket radio and probe around things like computers, monitors and LCD TVs and listen for the noise that cannot be "tuned out".  BPL and that noise have lots in common.  


Allison

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OK8BXF
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Posts: 49




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« Reply #2 on: April 14, 2004, 11:21:18 AM »

Hi Roger,

The problem with BPL is at the source end (the power lines) not the radio or power supply.

As Allison says it's like "many transmitters changing frequency at a very fast rate" and one characteristic, drawback if you like of switching very fast is harmonics.

Bottom line is for BPL and radio, not just amateur to work together then the BPL interference levels must me minimised at the source, that is where the filters need to be and by the sounds of things they haven't bothered inventing them yet...

Gavin / OK8BXF / MM1BXF
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KG4RUL
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Posts: 2743


WWW

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« Reply #3 on: April 14, 2004, 03:19:17 PM »

And they can't invent them!  The concept that BPL providers will notch out interfering frequencies as needed is ludicrous at best.  Notch out the amateur bands, public service, military, internation shortwave, etc. and there is NOTHING LEFT!  What I was always told when I inquired why broadband wasn't in the hinterlands was that getting the backbone to these areas was prohibitively costly.  BUT, BPL requires that costly backbone to be with a mile of each node for it to work.  The ONLY cost saving here is getting the signal to the subscriber's home.  That could be done easily with WiFi technology. No interference to incumbent services - NAH, not enough profit in this scenario.  Money ALWAYS win out.

Dennis / KG4RUL
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KT8K
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Posts: 1490




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« Reply #4 on: April 14, 2004, 04:26:15 PM »

I noticed one of the BPL schemes operates above 5GHz.  I don't think that one will pose any problems at all, even to hams operating on 5.6 GHz (or wherever we are up there).  I hope that system works, and helps the HF-based BPL systems go the way of the dodo.
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K1CJS
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Posts: 6046




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« Reply #5 on: April 14, 2004, 09:24:39 PM »

Keep on hoping.  Why do you think public service are going to UHF and beyond--other than the newer trunking technology.  It may be baloney, but I heard tell they knew this (BPL) was coming and got away from their HF frequencies while the getting was good.
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K6AER
Member

Posts: 3525




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« Reply #6 on: April 14, 2004, 10:23:57 PM »

BPL is a base band carrier below 40 MHz. At 5 GHZ the losses would be so great it would not transmit more than a few blocks.

All digital ISP offerings in the microwave band require microvave transceivers with antennas. They are not BPL.
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KT8K
Member

Posts: 1490




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« Reply #7 on: April 15, 2004, 04:34:34 PM »

Well, I couldn't figure out how they could do microwave BPL either, and maybe what I read was a typo ... a G in place of an M ...

On another tack, I wonder how well BPL equipment will handle the lightning transients that so often affect power lines.  Long conductors (power lines) make good antennas for such discharges (not to mention conducting the spikes when hit).  Maintenance costs on BPL could be expected to be high.  Let's hope the darned idea dies quickly.
73 de kt8k - Tim
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