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Author Topic: Using car speakers w/ mobile radio  (Read 1007 times)
K0IPG
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Posts: 252




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« on: June 28, 2004, 09:34:46 PM »

Aside from the usual casette adapters, etc, is there a way to connect a typical car speaker system (4 speakers) to a mobile transceiver, while still using them with the vehicle's audio system? Even if it wouldn't be possible to employ all 4 speakers, what precautions would be necessary to isolate the two audio amplifiers if using just one speaker? If I must resort to using just one speaker, which speaker would be best in terms of clarity (front/back, left/right)? I know that using the vehicle's built-in speakers for a mobile transciever isn't the best solution, but I just can't find a good location to place an external speaker.

Thanks
Dan K0IPG
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K5LXP
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« Reply #1 on: June 28, 2004, 09:57:12 PM »

Sounds like a lot of trouble for a mobile installation.  It seems counter-intuitive, but I install my mobile speakers up underneath the dash pointing towards the floor.  The sound reflects off the floor and is quite intelligible.  You can put it on the driver's or passenger's side equally effectively.  There is always a bracket or surface with an existing hole you can use to attach the bracket to, and neatness isn't paramount up in there.  Since you don't like the cassette adapter idea, you could always use an FM radio transmitter and listen to the transceiver's audio through the FM radio.  Still more trouble than just mounting a speaker though.  I fit 6 transceivers under my dash and still found room for 2 speakers.

Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
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KD5VHF
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Posts: 84




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« Reply #2 on: June 28, 2004, 10:15:06 PM »

Dan, What I use is a little 3" X 3" X 2" deep external speaker(No name/E-Bay $7 special) mounted on the far left side, top of the dash against the windshield using a piece of velcro. I ran the speaker lead down the far left edge of the dash, under the carpet and to the radio mounted behind the seat of my Ford Ranger. It could easily be ran to a radio mounted under the dash etc. Good clear audio and with it mounted near the windshield it has a megaphone effect. Turn the volume up too high and the audio will blow your hair back HI.
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AA4PB
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« Reply #3 on: June 28, 2004, 10:23:49 PM »

I actually did something similar one time with a 2M rig. I used a relay that swapped two speakers and 8-ohm load resistors between the car radio and the 2M rig. The relay was driven by the squelch circuit so that the car radio went to the resistors and the speakers to the 2M rig when the squelch opened. I could listen to the FM radio but it was interrupted by the 2M rig. It worked great but was quite a lot of effort for very little benefit.
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KC2MMI
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Posts: 621




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« Reply #4 on: June 29, 2004, 12:20:31 AM »

Dan, some car steroes have a "cell phone" audio input line. When there's input on that line, the radio automatically drops out the music to carry the phone call. If your radio has this option, you can obviously hook up your ham radio instead of a cell phone and use it that way. Car stereo places also (at least used to) sell a relay box that did the same thing, $25-50 or so.
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N7NBB
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« Reply #5 on: June 29, 2004, 09:40:20 AM »

There are many devices out there - Radio SHI* has one (sells it not made by them).. and I think most Wally-World, and other discount places may have them as well... You connect this to your portable CD player, FM RADIO, TV or whatever and it "RE-BROADCASTS" the audio in the Low-End of the FM commercial Radio BAND.

It allows selection of about four or six different frequencies, so as not to interfere with reception of FM radio stations that might be on a nearby frequency.

So you connect this tiny device to your radio's speaker output, and then TUNE your car's FM radio to the correct frequency and hear the "IN-CAR Broadcast" from your HOBBY RADIO on your car's sound system.

Don't know why anyone would want to do that.  Usually communications radio's speakers have an audio taper that makes them sound so much better than "STEREO" full spectrum speakers intended for MUSIC.

Good Luck
73
CAM
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KC8VWM
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« Reply #6 on: June 29, 2004, 02:31:11 PM »


I did that once.

I connected the radio's speaker output jack to the EXT. SOURCE input jacks on my car stereo. (not all car stereos have this option)

I seem to recall that it worked pretty good. I had a full carload of people talking to me, however I was driving all alone.

Was good & loud!

73

Charles - KC8VWM
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N3BIF
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Posts: 1190




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« Reply #7 on: June 29, 2004, 02:34:39 PM »

   Under the seat, your going to overdrive the speaker anyhow , I get freebies, on most any trash day you can find someone who upgraded their sound system over the weekend, so you blow them out after a few months...
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K0IPG
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Posts: 252




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« Reply #8 on: June 29, 2004, 03:16:09 PM »

Thanks, everyone. I'll see if the CD player in the car has an external source jack I might be able to plug into, but I doubt it. I really liked the suggestion of using the radio's squelch-state to drive relays to switch between the devices, but I'm not sure I want to put that much work into the system. I'll probably just end up putting the speaker under the seat (as David suggested), since that's where the radio is already located.
Thanks all
Dan K0IPG
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WB6BYU
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Posts: 13171




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« Reply #9 on: June 29, 2004, 03:41:49 PM »

I mount my radio speaker to the back of the headrest on
the driver's seat.  That way I can hear it even if the
audio output from the rig is weak.

Make sure it is mounted securely so it won't fly around
in a crash - the exact method will depend on how your
seat and headrest are built.  Consider covering it with
a layer of protective foam is someone rides in the seat
behind the driver.
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W0FM
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Posts: 2054




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« Reply #10 on: June 29, 2004, 05:42:10 PM »

I tried the cellular interrupt feature for two-way once but it was more complicated than I wanted to deal with and the car's hi-fi stereo speakers were not conducive to the frequency response desired for reliable voice communications.  

Now I have three retired commercial two-way speakers in the Jeep.  Two are mounted under the dash on the driver's side (one pointed up, the other pointed down and both sound great) and a third speaker mounted to the power seat mechanism under the passenger side seat.  It is pointed forward with a slight upward tilt and moves back and forth with the seat.  

All three installations took about and hour and a half start to finish.  

73,

Terry, WØFM
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K1CJS
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Posts: 6013




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« Reply #11 on: June 29, 2004, 07:48:37 PM »

Connecting into your car stereo speakers is nice--if you want to have to turn up the volume to make out what is being said.  A lot of hams do so.  But, considering that a communications speaker is more responsive in a narrower part of the audio spectrum, a communication speaker is a much better idea than the before mentioned connection into the car speakers.  And, even though those cheap little communications speakers seem like a waste of money, you will probably be able to hear the radio much better using one of them instead of the car system.
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