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Author Topic: 2 meter cw  (Read 315 times)
KE5BVJ
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Posts: 1




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« on: July 31, 2004, 06:50:43 PM »

does anyone use cw on 2 meters?
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WA4DOU
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Posts: 436




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« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2004, 07:41:24 PM »

yes
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K1CJS
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Posts: 6034




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« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2004, 08:15:04 PM »

There is a section of each band dedicated to CW except for the new band (I believe its 60 meters?)
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KB1LKR
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Posts: 1898




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« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2004, 08:44:54 PM »

In USA:
144.0-144.1 MHz, generally horizontally polarized (as is 2m USB) vs vertical used for FM mobile
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20599




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« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2004, 09:05:27 PM »

144.000-144.100 is "CW exclusively," reserved for CW only and not other modes; however in most parts of the U.S., the majority of CW activity is actually very close to 144.200, usually just below it -- like 144.190.

I just got off the air a few mins ago after having a few enjoyable contacts on 2m CW, all around 144.190.  If you can run 100W to a decent beam with a reasonable horizon, 2m CW usually guarantees contacts to about 250 miles or so.

WB2WIK/6
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K7VO
Member

Posts: 1010




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« Reply #5 on: August 01, 2004, 02:11:39 PM »

My usual disagreement with Steve:

If you get 10W or even 1W to a decent antenna you'll get out and make contacts.  You do NOT need 100W.  The higher and better the antenna, of course, the better you'll get out.

I run 10W max and I have probably a 200 mile radius for reliable communications.  I also have a 10 element beam about 40' up (soon to go higher), relatively low loss coax, and a relatively high location for my home.

73,
Caity
K7VO
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AB3BK
Member

Posts: 30




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« Reply #6 on: August 01, 2004, 05:22:02 PM »

I call CQ on the calling frequency 144.200 because that is where everyone is parked.  Then I gradually move down after each contact into the 190s.  CW contacts cover a greater distance than SSB because it's easier to understand under poor reception.

Good Luck
Dave AB3BK
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WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20599




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« Reply #7 on: August 01, 2004, 07:17:32 PM »

Caity, I can't argue that low power on CW works very well.  My old, original "Tuna Tin" transmitter, which is now older than many of the hams I meet, runs about 300mW output on 40m CW and makes lots of contacts.  That power, connected to a good 2m beam, would also make contacts.  (My best DX with the Tuna Tin on 40 was DS4NPL -- 24,000 miles per Watt on 40.  I know others have done lots better.)

I spoke about "100 Watts" because this seems to be about the average power of a 2m SSB/CW station nowadays, especially with the ready availability of IC-706's and such.  It was an *example!*

Hope to meet you one day for a coffee, maybe with fresh bagel and lox (that was breakfast this morning, with the XYL) to further discuss the ramifications of both CW and QRP.  Or just because.  I'll be back East next on October 17th, so who knows?

73 de Steve WB2WIK/6
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K7VO
Member

Posts: 1010




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« Reply #8 on: August 01, 2004, 10:55:00 PM »

Steve, I think the OM and I would love to meet you and yours.  I prefer tea to coffee but I'm sure I can find a place that is very good at both if you are ever in the area.  In case it isn't extremely obvious I respect your knowledge and opinions greatly.  I think our disagreements have more to do with having different goals and interests within a hobby we both love.

Oh, I do SSB at 10W as well Smiley  A modern rig would be nice.  It's been a rough couple of years for us (medical issues, each of us having periods of unemployment for the first times in our lives) and I have cut back the shack and am "making do" more than ever.  I currently run an old Kenwood TS-780 for my 2m/70cm SSB/CW base rig (and for 2m FM as well) and my Mizuho portables for, well... portable Smiley

One more point on 2m CW:  on those wonderful occasions when the band is wide open some CW will appear just below 144.100 if the band is pretty filled up with voice ops above that for a ways.  It never hurts to tune down there.

Most of my CW contacts on 2m started out as voice contacts during an opening when it was just plain difficult to get through.  I switch to CW.  Sometimes the station on the other end can copy me.  Sadly, sometimes the station on the other end can't copy CW at all.  CW is an essential skill to pull out the longest of the long distance QSOs on VHF/UHF.  I would have never worked Albuquerque, NM on 2m without it.

During contests if conditions are marginal or poor the CW ops come out of the woodwork on 6m, 2m, and even 70cm.  That's when CW QSOs actually start out as CW QSOs Smiley  There also used to be a local group that got on 2m CW as a sched, but that seems to have died out Sad

Anyway, even if there is no local 2m CW on a daily basis it will be there during band openings and contests.  When I had my Icom IC-275A I actually installed the CW filter.  It even turned out to be useful more than a few times Smiley

73,
Caity
K7VO
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