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Author Topic: 80-10 meter wire antenna?  (Read 638 times)
KM5WX
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Posts: 57




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« on: September 26, 2004, 06:45:34 PM »

  If you had a lot 160' long with antenna support roughly in the middle but only wanted one antenna to work these bands what would it be? Thanks Richard
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K0RFD
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« Reply #1 on: September 26, 2004, 06:53:08 PM »

1) a doublet about 66 - 66 1/2 feet per side, fed with ladder line, and a good tuner.

2) a "fan" or "umbrella" dipole with several resonant half-wave dipoles fed from a current balun with coax to the shack.  You can tie them off at different places around your yard.  80M, 40M, and 20M dipoles should get you most bands with just the crippleware autotuner in most radios.  

Each in inverted-fee configuration.

The space will accommodate either.
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KC8YVE
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« Reply #2 on: September 26, 2004, 06:54:23 PM »

I am working the same thread, please see. http://www.eham.net/forums/Elmers/74002

We are running on the same path.

Tracy, KC8YVE, Saginaw, Michigan.
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K2WH
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« Reply #3 on: September 26, 2004, 07:25:06 PM »

1) a doublet about 66 - 66 1/2 feet per side, fed with ladder line, and a good tuner.

2) a "fan" or "umbrella" dipole with several resonant half-wave dipoles fed from a current balun with coax to the shack. You can tie them off at different places around your yard. 80M, 40M, and 20M dipoles should get you most bands with just the crippleware autotuner in most radios.

Each in inverted-fee configuration.

The space will accommodate either.
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N3ZKP
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« Reply #4 on: September 26, 2004, 07:27:47 PM »

Is there an echo in here?

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W2AEW
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« Reply #5 on: September 26, 2004, 07:53:13 PM »

I agree with the "echo'd" response.  I use the antenna described in #1, and am very happy with the results.  Simple, cheap, homemade in minutes - been up for years.
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N6AJR
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« Reply #6 on: September 26, 2004, 10:24:41 PM »

http://www.hamuniverse.com/multidipole.html
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N4UM
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« Reply #7 on: September 27, 2004, 12:47:14 AM »

The open wire or ladder line center fed 130 foot wire will be easier to tune on 160 if a loading coil is added about 10 feet from each end.  Use a 2 inch diameter piece of PVC with about 50 or 60 turns of wire on it.
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WIRELESS
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« Reply #8 on: September 27, 2004, 05:20:38 AM »

The open wire line feed multi band antenna is a very good all around antenna but its also a big pain in the ass too.  Every time the user wants to change freq. or band, alot of tuning is necessary.  There are automatic tuners but they don't work above 400 or 500 watts. Some of these auto tuners don't cover as much as the manufacturers say.

The D4 rotatable dipole will cover 40-10m without the use of a tuner. A separate 80 meter dipole could be used with it.  Also, rotatable dipoles only need to be supported at the center.

A trap dipole is also a decent multiband antenna that doesn't require a tuner.

Try them all and have fun.
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K6XT
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« Reply #9 on: September 27, 2004, 07:09:10 AM »

I just moved from CA to CO, taking down all the towers etc. In CO, needing something up before winter, I put up a off center fed dipole (OCFD). I'm very impressed with the performance. Mine is 260 ft long because the space is there, so I can pick up 160. As others have pointed out:
1. There's no free lunch. One ant for 9 bands leads to some tuning effort required. You'll need a tuner. I rate this simply the price to be paid. I need an ext  tuner on 160, 80, 30, 20. The rig tuner covers the others.
2. The wire is directive above the lowest band it covers and has gain. I rate this a good thing.
3. My plot is to also have up a vertical to cover the azimuth gaps in the OCFD.

There's a discussion on OCFD as part of the tuner article in Oct QST p. 35. For the most part it will also apply in your case, the center fed wire, except that you'll have a good match on the band where your wire is a resonant half wave. Also see the article by VE2CV QST October 1989 on OFCD - the feeding and matching discussion will apply to your DP on nonresonant bands.

73 Art
k6xt at arrl dot net
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KM5WX
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« Reply #10 on: September 27, 2004, 05:58:22 PM »

 OK Thanks for the comments. Next question, What ohm open wire feeders and what size wire should I make them out of? I have over 100 plexiglas spreaders about 8 inches long and 1 inch wide. I have several different tuners not including the one in my rig so thats not a problem. Thanks again richard
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KM5WX
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« Reply #11 on: September 27, 2004, 05:59:10 PM »

 OK Thanks for the comments. Next question, What ohm open wire feeders and what size wire should I make them out of? I have over 100 plexiglas spreaders about 8 inches long and 1 inch wide. I have several different tuners not including the one in my rig so thats not a problem. Thanks again richard
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WD8PHW
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« Reply #12 on: September 27, 2004, 07:10:05 PM »

You can use a variety of feed lines.  I think I once read that 600 ohm (home brew) is the best for the doublet application.  Now-a-days, most use the 450 ladder type (readily available in stores).  Go to the library or buy the ARRL Antenna Hand Book it's a very good reference.

Have fun,

Greg  
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K0CWO
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« Reply #13 on: September 28, 2004, 11:40:37 AM »

I would use a 160 foot doublet with the center as high as possible (50 feet would be great).  I would order 14 or 16 gauge stranded/insulated enough for both sides of the antenna.  Eighty feet per side plus however much you need for the open wire feed line.  Example:  if you need a 100 foot feed line then add 80 foot for one side of the flat top equals 180 feet per side for 360 feet total.  I would make 4 inch Plexiglas spreaders which will be about 600 ohm impedance, and construct each side of the doublet so no soldering is required at the center feed point. In other words, one continuous run of wire per side.  Build this antenna and put it to use with a decent balanced feed line capable antenna tuner.  It will work great for casual operation.  Not good for a contester who wants to be able to change bands and freqs quickly.

I use an antenna similar to the one described above with a 1000 watt amp and a Ten Tec 238B tuner.  The antenna is 35 feet of the ground.  If I can hear them, I can work them.  This is usually coast to coast on the low bands and world wide on the higher bands.

Put it up any way you can!

73, BJ
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KC8HXO
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« Reply #14 on: September 28, 2004, 05:24:24 PM »

Well, If you have any other supports, and a little room the other way, the "Loop Skywire" antenna is a KILLER. See the skywires group on Yahoo for more information. Best kept secret in the antenna world, in my humble opinion. Any way, just get SOMETHING in the air, and get to it. Too many people today worry about the "perfect" set-up, and never get anything in the air! Like the commercials used to say ... "JUST DO IT!"

73- Greg, KC8HXO
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