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Author Topic: 2m/70cm SSB nets  (Read 1943 times)
AG4DG
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Posts: 537


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« on: February 24, 2005, 01:12:58 PM »

Where can I find a list of these nets?

Also, under what conditions are VHF/UHF band openings most likely?  I think that meteor showers, ionospheric disturbances, and atmospheric inversions are the most likely to lead to openings.  Correct me if I'm wrong.
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20547




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« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2005, 02:57:08 PM »

http://www.newsvhf.com/vhfnets.html

http://www.svhfs.org/nets.htm

and lots of related links.  Depends where you're located.

The World Above 50 MHz column in QST by W3ZZ and the VHF column in CQ by N6CL both list VHF-UHF weak-signal nets all over the U.S. and Canada annually.

Meteor showers do not enhance VHF propagation in any way.  They create ionized trails which are signal reflective so are, in themselves, a form of propagation.  But random meteors are always there, and always workable -- always.  It only depends on your power, antenna gain and mode used.  Using new technology weak signal digital modes, random meteors are worked every single day of the year.

Ionospheric disturbances usually only affect six meters, although can create the proper conditions for Aurora, which is often workable on 2m as well, and a bit less on 135cm, and rarely on 70cm.

Temperature inversion in the troposphere definitely creates enhanced VHF-UHF conditions, sometimes only over the path of the inversion layer.  More exciting is a trophospheric duct, which acts much like a waveguide and can create incredibly low-loss UHF paths over very long distances.  We usually experience one or two (maybe more, when nobody notices) such ducts from southern California across the Pacific to Hawaii (a 2500 mile path) that works on 144 MHz and all the bands above, up into the microwave region.  I'm at a location that has never been directly in the duct, so if I want to work it, I have to take the station portable -- but not very far.  Within five miles of my home, the duct often hits, in the mountains just south of me.

WB2WIK/6
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K7VO
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Posts: 1010




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« Reply #2 on: February 24, 2005, 05:34:39 PM »

Courtesy of Eddie, KD4CPV, who sends out this listing as part of his 6m net e-newsletter:

2 Meter Nets During The Week
Sunday 144.220  N1GMV 8:30 pm  Zebulon NC Not running presently
Monday 144.230 9 pm  Tidewater VA
Tuesday 144.225  K4HC  Chris  8 pm Greensboro NC

Sorry to hear John, N1GMV's net died.  I checked in a few times when I lived in NC but there realy wasn't much participation.  

In case anyone is interested, here is Eddie's list of 6m nets:

6 Meter Nets During The Week
Monday 50.145   NI4I  Jim  9 pm Roanoke Va
Tuesday  50.250  K4IRT  8pm  Lexington SC  
Wednesday 50.150 9pm  Wheeling West Va
Thursday  50.200  KJ4RB  8pm  Pink Hill NC
Friday 50.400  W4KCS  9pm  Lynchburg VA
Saturday 50.200 KD4MYE   8am till 930 am Wake Forest NC
Saturday 50.213   8pm  Charleston SC
Saturday 53.01   9 PM Lexington VA

I hope this helps.

73,
Caity
K7VO/8
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K7VO
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Posts: 1010




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« Reply #3 on: February 24, 2005, 05:38:16 PM »

The best openings on 2m are created by E-skip a/k/a sporadic E.  These are dense clouds of highly ionized particles in the E layer of the ionosphere.  Es openings can lead to contacts out as far as 2,000-2,500 miles on 2m.  They also occur on rare occasions on 1.35 meters.  They are the mainstay of 6m and 10m propogation at the bottom of the sunspot cycle.

Es can happen anytime, day or night, at any time of year, but is most common during the late spring and summer months.  There also is a short Es season around Christmastime.  However, we have had a bunch of unseasonal Es openings on 6m this month.  I just got my 2m beam back up at the new QTH so I don't know if there have been similar 2m openings.

72/73,
Caity
K7VO/8
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N6AJR
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Posts: 9892




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« Reply #4 on: February 24, 2005, 06:36:34 PM »

OK, so they use 1500 watts into stacked 40 element antennas with and ERP of about a billion watts, point it at the moon and then they call it WEAK SIGNAL...

some one has a sense of humor..
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KE4SKY
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« Reply #5 on: February 25, 2005, 05:15:25 AM »

The K4VOC Vortex of Chaos Pandemonium Simplex Net meets on 146.595 MHz FM, twice weekly at 9pm on Friday and Saturday nights and is open to all licensed amateurs.  The primary coverage area of the net is Northern Virginia, the West Virginia Panhandle and Western Maryland, although there are occasional checkins from south central Pennsylvania as well. The purpose of the net is to promote emergency preparedness and good engineering practices for participating hams. This is a directed net and also a training net.

For more info visit the Yahoo group:

K4VOC-Simplex-Net-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

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KB9WQJ
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Posts: 174




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« Reply #6 on: February 25, 2005, 06:34:31 AM »

There are some 2m nets here.

http://www.swotrc.net/

73
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20547




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« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2005, 08:38:34 AM »

I think you'll find, like most of us have, that you can either wait, be very patient, and hope you have good timing to catch the next propagation peak that might occur...or, you can make your own propagation by virtue of hardware.

As Caity says, sporadic-E produces probably the longest-range contacts available on 2m without moonbounce, but it is very rare.  Based on reports from all over the world by very active VHF operators, one is lucky to experience a single sporadic-E event that's workable on two meters each year.  Once a year isn't very often.  It's more workable on 10m and 6m of course.  It's never workable on 70cm.

Random meteorites always occur, however; and of course, the moon is in position to support VHF contacts via e.m.e. most of the time, as long as it's above the horizon.  Problem is, to work these things takes some fairly hefty minimum station hardware.  Not as hefty as it used to be when we relied on analog detection and CW, though.  Nowadays, using modern digital modes including detection methods, more stations are working random meteors than ever before and the "minimum hardware" has been reduced to maybe 150W output power and a single long yagi for 2m.  It's much tougher on 70cm, though.

Waiting for a meteor shower or "storm" can be hugely disappointing.  I sat atop Tehachapi Peak at 6,800 feet above sea level overlooking half the state, with a kilowatt and beams at the ready for the Perseids shower in 1996 (I think that was the year), and it was pretty disappointing.  We could visually "see" a lot of meteor trails, but making contacts is another thing altogether.  I think I completed about 50 six meter m.s. contacts, and maybe four or five on two meters, from an excellent location with 1 kW output power and a beam on each band, using CW and SSB (no digital).  That can be typical of a "shower."  An average home station during that shower worked absolutely nothing.

It's a lot more fun to "make your own propagation" by building a good station and using it actively.

WB2WIK/6
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K7VO
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Posts: 1010




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« Reply #8 on: February 25, 2005, 01:12:35 PM »

Once a year for Es on 2m?  Really?  IME over the past 20 years it was more like half a dozen times.  Maybe it's just where I lived.  On 222 it's once a year if you're lucky. (It did happen once last summer.) On 432 it just doesn't happen as Steve correctly pointed out.

The point Steve correctly makes is that it is not an everyday occurrence.  With a good receiver, and a decent sized beam at a respectable height working stations 300-400 miles away on a daily basis without any band opening at all.  Then add ducting, Es, meteor scatter, and you start realizing that with a decent station you can get a whole lot of enjoyment out of 2m SSB/CW.  Please note the CW.  There are times where you cannot pull out a voice contact but with CW you CAN make a go of it.

I still encourage people with modest stations to do what they can with what they have.  I also encourage them to be realistic about their expectations.  Even a small beam or a horizontal loop or two is better than anything vertical.  Trying 2m or 70cm SSB/CW with a vertical is a great way to hear next to nothing and talk to almost nobody.

72/73,
Caity
K7VO/8
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KC8VWM
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Posts: 3124




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« Reply #9 on: February 25, 2005, 05:53:38 PM »

"under what conditions are VHF/UHF band openings most likely? "

1. When you least expect them

2. On Sundays when most nets are active

3. More frequently if you use your equipment more regularly.


.. Call it strange, but these things are actually true. I am located in Columbus, Ohio and one of my most distant contacts occured on VHF FM with a station near Charlotte, NC using only 35 watts and the formula listed above.

QSL card available on request.


73 Charles - KC8VWM
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