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Author Topic: Not recieving Signals  (Read 247 times)
KD7UFW
Member

Posts: 32




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« on: March 10, 2005, 07:54:11 AM »

Hello,
I posted a week ago with a question on power supplies for the HTX 100.  Thank you everyone that responded.  I have the rig set up now with an inverted V about 10 feet up and I am not hearing any other stations CW or SSB.  I have tried at all times of the day and night and nothing comes in except for strong tones that sound like someone is holding down their key and won't let go.  This happens in all parts of the band.  I may not have been clear in my question so let me know what other information you may need to help me.  Thank you again!!
Ben
KD7UFW
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K5DVW
Member

Posts: 2193




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« Reply #1 on: March 10, 2005, 07:57:42 AM »

Ummm, well, 10m is very DEAD right now. The sunspots are gone. You might hear an opening now and then, but expect it to be dead quiet for a few years.

The tones you hear are probably locally generated RFI from computers, appliances and stuff.
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20612




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« Reply #2 on: March 10, 2005, 08:01:05 AM »

Well, it's possible the receiver doesn't work!

But it's also possible you're just listening when there's no propagation, so nothing's coming through.  10m operators, for the most part, are pretty fickle: When the band's open, they're there using it, and when the band's not open (which is most of the time lately), they just abandon 10m altogether and operate lower bands that *are* open.

Lately, 10m is a "daytime band," so if you listen at night, you're likely to hear nothing, no matter what you use.  Sometimes the MUF doesn't get even close to 28 MHz, so even during the day, there's nothing on.

An inverted vee at 10' will not hear the weak signals that guys with big antennas on towers hear, at all.  The difference is really quite a lot; however, again, we're all at the mercy of propagation.

I'd suggest you find somebody very local to you to run a test with: Another ham who can get on 10m and lives within maybe 5-10 miles.  That way, it won't matter if the band has any propagation or not, you should still hear each other via tropo.

WB2WIK/6

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N2MG
Administrator

Posts: 0



« Reply #3 on: March 10, 2005, 09:37:31 AM »

I guess you missed listening this past weekend - during the ARRL DX SSB test - if you had you'd have heard lots of signals...

We operated at K3LR who has a three-stack of 7-element beams on 10m and worked only one European (EA5) - nearly everyone else we worked was in South America (one or two KH6s, a ZL and a handful of Africa).

10m, with its dependency on HIGH sunspot numbers is going to be one tough band to use for quite a while.

Mike N2MG
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N4LI
Member

Posts: 397




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« Reply #4 on: March 10, 2005, 11:56:16 AM »

A couple of things...

We are very close to the bottom of the Sunspot Cycle; SFIs have been getting down into the 70s.  That's pretty darn low.

When the spots are plentiful and the SFI is high, 10m is a DX paradise.  During a big voice contest, you might hear DX from 28.300 to 29 MHz or even above.  That's 700 kc of DX buffet.  Cool.

But, those days are over for a few years.  10m will be quiet often until we ramp back up.  But, that does not mean there is nothing to work.  One just has to look for the openings.

To be sure, in this past weekend's contest, there were signals.  Lots of 'em.  They were just less exotic than in days past.  With my lame dipole, I was working South America, the Caribbean, Hawaii, and some Africa.  Heck, I have a friend here in town who worked Kenya with an HTX-10 and a mag mount.  Cool.

So, if you look for some DX, you'll find it, assuming the radio is working.  Without an on-going contest, you won't see large volumes of it.  But, the occasional station will pop in.

I just flipped through the band while typing, and heard a couple of things -- two Latin Americans and a beacon from Hawaii.  So, all is not lost.  Further, last night we had some sporadic E.  While I did not flip though much of the band, we were getting some domestic beacons very loud, indeed.

I suppose you might need to find out somehow if the radio is working.  Even with a modest antenna, you should eventually hear something.

Now, an aside... after getting my general, I rushed to my HTX-10 and was anxiously looking for signals.  No luck, day after day.  A week later, I noticed... the RF gain was all the way down.  10 minutes later?  I worked San Antonio (Es, I guess).  Learning curve.

Hope you figure it out.  10 is a great band.

Peter, N4LI

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N4LI
Member

Posts: 397




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« Reply #5 on: March 10, 2005, 11:56:20 AM »

A couple of things...

We are very close to the bottom of the Sunspot Cycle; SFIs have been getting down into the 70s.  That's pretty darn low.

When the spots are plentiful and the SFI is high, 10m is a DX paradise.  During a big voice contest, you might hear DX from 28.300 to 29 MHz or even above.  That's 700 kc of DX buffet.  Cool.

But, those days are over for a few years.  10m will be quiet often until we ramp back up.  But, that does not mean there is nothing to work.  One just has to look for the openings.

To be sure, in this past weekend's contest, there were signals.  Lots of 'em.  They were just less exotic than in days past.  With my lame dipole, I was working South America, the Caribbean, Hawaii, and some Africa.  Heck, I have a friend here in town who worked Kenya with an HTX-10 and a mag mount.  Cool.

So, if you look for some DX, you'll find it, assuming the radio is working.  Without an on-going contest, you won't see large volumes of it.  But, the occasional station will pop in.

I just flipped through the band while typing, and heard a couple of things -- two Latin Americans and a beacon from Hawaii.  So, all is not lost.  Further, last night we had some sporadic E.  While I did not flip though much of the band, we were getting some domestic beacons very loud, indeed.

I suppose you might need to find out somehow if the radio is working.  Even with a modest antenna, you should eventually hear something.

Now, an aside... after getting my general, I rushed to my HTX-10 and was anxiously looking for signals.  No luck, day after day.  A week later, I noticed... the RF gain was all the way down.  10 minutes later?  I worked San Antonio (Es, I guess).  Learning curve.

Hope you figure it out.  10 is a great band.

Peter, N4LI

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K0RFD
Member

Posts: 1368




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« Reply #6 on: March 10, 2005, 01:20:57 PM »

Tune around between 28200 and 28300 during the day.

If you hear a few CW stations, those are mostly beacons.  If you can hear them, that means 1) your radio indeed works, and 2) 10 meters is open to SOMEWHERE.  You can find out where by copying the beacon IDs and googling them.  Some beacons even transmit a web address, city, or grid square.

If you do not hear any beacons, don't assume your radio doesn't work.  Just try at a different time or on a different day.

If you can hear truckers on the low end of the band, you also know your radio is working and the band is open to someplace.

I love 10 meters, but it has been really lean lately (I did make more than 40 Qs on 10 during the contest, but still that's nothing compared to prior years).  Whenever I'm out in the shack during the day, I go up to 10 and listen for beacons for a few minutes.  Never hurts to know if the band is open.  It will open a bit more in a couple of months during Sporadic E season.
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N6AJR
Member

Posts: 9910




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« Reply #7 on: March 10, 2005, 05:44:28 PM »

down load dx spotter or some similar program.  when you see 10 meter spots near you , you should be able to hear them, I worked japan, and I think new zeland this last weekend  amoung others on 10.. contest..
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W9SZ
Member

Posts: 66


WWW

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« Reply #8 on: March 24, 2005, 01:24:34 PM »

Hopefully you will see this before the coming weekend of March 26-27. It's the weekend of the CQWW WPX SSB contest.

If you don't hear some signals in the SSB part of the band (listen between 28300 and 28400), then I'm guessing the receiver has problems. This contest has always been known to make a live band out of a dead one!  

73, Zack W9SZ
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