Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: special license for soldiers?  (Read 261 times)
KD5KAC
Member

Posts: 2




Ignore
« on: October 10, 2005, 05:49:52 PM »

hi, was wondering if there was a special license for soldiers going to war?  i am a old tech license holder who is tryin to learn code, but just got word we leave in january for iraq.  i don't know that i will be able to upgrade by then, but would like to operate on hf while i was there (if an infantryman has any free time)  if no such animal is available, is there a way to test via email or something, while in iraq?  p.s. if there is anyone who could help me learn the code in time and lives near lansing michigan please! email me, i really want to upgrade if i can swing it in time
Logged
KC8VWM
Member

Posts: 3119




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: October 10, 2005, 07:17:50 PM »

I suspect that even if you can swing it, you will probobly still require special clearance(s) from your C.O. to operate any radio equipment while stationed in Iraq.

They may very well determine that you are not qualified regardless of any license class currently held. This is not because you dont know how to operate the equipment, but rather because you may require special security clearance and written authorization to do so.

You need to contact your C.O. for more information.

73
Logged
KB4QAA
Member

Posts: 2371




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: October 10, 2005, 09:14:11 PM »

There are no special FCC licensing provisions for military members.  As far as testing goes, you will need 3 Extras who are accredited VEC's to proctor your exam.

You many still be able to get HF reciprocal privileges depending on what that host country permits.  

One other possibility for radio ops is to get a MARS license and help out your fellow soldiers stay connected with home.

Good Luck!  73  Bill
Logged
N8UZE
Member

Posts: 1524




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: October 11, 2005, 04:14:52 AM »

Download the free G4FON software and follow the directions precisely.  Practice EVERY DAY for 60 minutes (break it into 4 sessions of 15 minutes each) and you should be ready to pass the code in 30 days.  Since it is only October now, you should then have several opportunities to take and pass the code test.

Set the program at 15wpm character speed, 5wpm word speed, and 750Hz tone so it will sound similar to the actual test.
Logged
WA4MJF
Member

Posts: 1003




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: October 11, 2005, 07:24:58 AM »

If you're a ham, you can get an Iraqi
callsign and operate.  The operative
word if you're a ham.  There are VE teams
just about anywhere the military is.
Check with your post's ham club.

73 de Ronnie
Logged
WILLY
Member

Posts: 286




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: October 11, 2005, 08:08:19 AM »

I agree with N8UZE.  Even though I'm not repeating his words, I urge you to re-read his post and take it very seriously.


In addition:

You said something about getting help in the Lansing, Michigan area.  
Excellent idea!   Practicing by yourself as N8UZE recommended will work, and is a very good way to get yourself where you want to be -  but if you have a practice buddy, it is easier.    Doing both - by yourself practice and with a friend - is probably the best.

Go to http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/club/clubsearch.phtml
and search Michigan.   Then text searching the page, I found "Lansing" three times.  Two of those clubs specifically mentioned "help for newcomers".  
Try to find a club and some hams, in your area, willing to help you.


Btw, to upgrade to General, besides the code that we have been discussing, you'll need to take a written test.  Don't forget to study for it too.  Smiley


You said you were an old tech.   We are assuming that you are a 'No Code' Tech.   Just for the record, is that correct?
If you had a Tech license from way back - circa 1987 or so -  then you might need some different advice.


73
Logged
KC8VWM
Member

Posts: 3119




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: October 11, 2005, 08:16:45 AM »

The military isn't like everyday walmart shopper civilian life.

You can't just start hauling over your HF radio equipment and start transmitting and setup anywhere you choose at any given US military base installation.

For example, the military often establish radio quite zones to prevent interference to navigational equipment. They may have certain radio protocals in place to protect similar radio related equipment from interference.

Your also not very likely to get your superior officers blessing when they catch you transmitting on HF radio equipment at a US military base installation without the proper authorizations or security clearances.  

I suspect (just a lucky guess) that you will more than likely get your butt dragged over to the dept. of hoosegow for a pleasant interogation session to question your intentions and/or your radio related transmission activities.

Good luck on the code.

Logged
WA4MJF
Member

Posts: 1003




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: October 11, 2005, 09:47:08 AM »

KC8VWM, all he has to do if he is
a ham is apply to the CENTCOM or
Third US Army* J-5 through channels
and he'll get a YA
callsign.  You're right as to his
CO controlling where he can set
the station up.  But the actual
licensing is (although at last
report, it was done by a Captain,
so I can't say above his pay grade
:-) ) is way above his CO in levels
of Command.  

There are many service members in Iraq
operating now, probably more YAs are
GIs than actual Iraqis.  Heck, there is
even ECHOLINK for the Techs there.

*It was done by the Coalition Provisional
Authority which is now defunct.

73 de Ronnie  
Logged
WA4MJF
Member

Posts: 1003




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: October 11, 2005, 10:40:11 AM »

Correction, I shoulda said YI, not YA.

I get OIF and OEF mixed up sometimes.
Same procedures for each though.

73 de Ronnie

Logged
KC8VWM
Member

Posts: 3119




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: October 11, 2005, 03:27:35 PM »

Thanks Ronnie. I wasn't 100% clear on the actual procedure used.

73 KC8VWM
Logged
AA4PB
Member

Posts: 12836




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: October 11, 2005, 05:37:34 PM »

I believe it is still true that any active duty military person (with the chief operator's permission)can operate a MARS station on military frequencies without having a ham license.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!