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Author Topic: Antenna Corrosion: Butternut HF6-V  (Read 746 times)
WA2MGB
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« on: July 23, 2006, 06:24:38 PM »

I'm having an unusual problem with my Butternut vertical.  She works fine, excellent SWR's and then suddenly my SWRs on 80m and 20m rise. There is no rust, and my doorknob caps are all good.   I have found that antenna which is ground mounted next to salt water is "collecting" a thin salt build up on its' hardware and doorknob capacitors.  If I spray all connection with De-Oxit 5  I have no problems for about 2 weeks.  Then the humid/salt air does a number on the antenna.  Can I coat the antenna with something that will not allow the salt air to cause contact/connection problems?

Otherwise, the antenna works very well.

Tnx,
Ted K2FDR
formerly WA2MGB
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N7TEE
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Posts: 40




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« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2006, 08:44:14 PM »

I have a Butternut vertical that was painted with what looks like a varnish or verathain (sp), it has what looks like oxgard put into it.  You might try oxgard on all fittings.

The antenna was in the air for about eight years before the orignal owner became a sk.

Dave Sanford
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K7UNZ
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Posts: 691




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« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2006, 09:21:28 PM »

A visit to your local boating supply outlet should give you a solution.  I too want to say use a spa varnish, but can't actually say it will take to the antenna metal.  I've had my HF-9V stuck in the ground for something like 12 or 13 years now, but Tucson doesn't have the salt water problem (hi).

Oh, yeah, remember that after you coat the coils, if you need to adjust 'em you will need to re-coat them with the sealant.

73, Jim/k7unz
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N3OX
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« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2006, 09:25:24 PM »

Although a varnish is probably a solution to your problem, I'd start by varnishing the problem areas only with a good electrical varnish.  

If you do the whole antenna you might have to retune it, though the aluminum will last longer if you varnish the whole thing.

Salt air and aluminum don't get along, but there are lots of hams who deal with it... hope some can chime in here.

Thoroughly inland,

Dan
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73,
Dan
http://www.n3ox.net

Monkey/silicon cyborg, beeping at rocks since 1995.
N4ZOU
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Posts: 340




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« Reply #4 on: July 24, 2006, 05:17:21 AM »

Check out the Yahoo group Butternut antennas here.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Butternut-antennas/
it's free and chock full of good information and help.
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KB4QAA
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Posts: 2488




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« Reply #5 on: July 24, 2006, 10:36:26 AM »

For the electrical connections, and where elements mate,  use GB Oxi-Guard, or similar, found in the electrical section of any hardware store.  It is petrolatum with powdered zinc.  I've used this for years on my antennas.

To protect the other surfaces clean with a scotch brite pad, rinse clean, and apply Krylon clear acrylic spray, or equivalent.   I'm not sure about using spar varnish...not sure that will hold up.

good luck,

bill
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