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Author Topic: PerthPlus Outbacker for fixed station use?  (Read 334 times)
W1CEW
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« on: August 13, 2006, 07:35:39 PM »

Okay, so I have my eye on one of these that is available to me "gently used."  I've heard good things about it, but I wonder how it would compare, say roof mounted, with a Hustler or Butternut vertical (with adequate radials)?  Would the Outbacker be significantly inferior on the low bands?

Thanks for any thoughts,

Chuck
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W3LK
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« Reply #1 on: August 13, 2006, 08:05:33 PM »

Almost certainly, plus you would have to get on the roof to adjust the lead to change bands. This is a mobile antenna, and not all that good, at best.

I would pick the Butternut HF6V or HF9V, with the Hustler as my second choice.

73,

Lon - W3LK
Baltimore, Maryland
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KX8N
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« Reply #2 on: August 13, 2006, 08:09:10 PM »

I've got a Perth Plus that I've used for probably four years now, mounted on their ground-coupled tripod they sell.  I've really enjoyed it.  Some of my more memorable contacts have included Alaska, the former Sovied Union, and Hawaii, all on SSB running 100 watts.  I don't know how well it performs compared to those others, but I do know that it performs well.  I paid a total of close to $300 for all of it new, and it's been worth every penny.
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W5DXP
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« Reply #3 on: August 13, 2006, 08:12:35 PM »

Compared to a 75m dipole, an Outbacker probably radiates one watt on 75m for every 100 watts radiated by the dipole, i.e. it is about 1% efficient. Do you enjoy QRP?
--
73, Cecil, W5DXP
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73, Cecil, www.w5dxp.com
The purpose of an antenna tuner is to increase the current through the radiation resistance at the antenna to the maximum available magnitude resulting in a radiated power of I2(RRAD) from the antenna.
KQ6Q
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« Reply #4 on: August 13, 2006, 08:25:37 PM »

Only if you have to take down the antenna after every use! I use Hustler resonators for my fixed station antennas, but I have a resonator for every band, 80 through 10, with five (20-17-15-12-10) on one mast, and three (80-40-30) on another, and they're mag-mounted on a 24x56 foot metal mobilehome roof, with tuned counterpoises to help couple to the roof. They work very nicely in this setup - but I don't have to climb a ladder to change bands, and we don't have winter weather here. Given my location and lack of trees, this is a good setup for me. I also use a Valor 160m whip on 160, and I do make contacts - no comparison to a 'real' antenna for 160, but I get out on 160 about as far as I do on 6 meters with my 3 el beam - 1000-1500 miles.
  If you use the Outbacker, be SURE to give it a ground to work against - clip wire to a metal fence, extension cords laying out the ground, jumper cables, some kind of counterpoise! But with the wander lead band change, putting it on the roof of a house is a waste of an antenna!
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #5 on: August 13, 2006, 08:34:31 PM »

>PerthPlus Outbacker for fixed station use?  Reply  
by W1CEW on August 13, 2006  Mail this to a friend!  
Okay, so I have my eye on one of these that is available to me "gently used." I've heard good things about it, but I wonder how it would compare, say roof mounted, with a Hustler or Butternut vertical (with adequate radials)? Would the Outbacker be significantly inferior on the low bands?<

::Yes, it is significantly inferior because it's shorter and has much lower Q.  On a band like 10m, you might not notice much difference; but then, 10m is rarely open these days.  On the bands that have activity and propagation, e.g., 17m, 20m, 30m, 40m, 80m, there is a VERY significant difference between a Perth Plus and, say, a Butternut HF9V with radials.  Significant can mean "several S units."

The hugest difference results from an effective radial system.

WB2WIK/6
 
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W3JJH
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« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2006, 04:15:44 AM »

I have a Outbacker Outreach for portable use.  It's a bit better than the Perth Plus on the lower bands.  Based on my experience I'd assume that given a decent counterpoise system, a Perth Plus would have reasonable performance on 17 m and higher frequencies.  It would be useable on 20, 30,  and (sotra/kinda) 40 m.  It would be a deaf/mute on 80 m.
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W1CEW
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« Reply #7 on: August 14, 2006, 05:57:18 AM »

So then, let me flip the question.  If it needs a decent counterpoise, what would that say about using this antenna for mobile operation?  Say 20m?

I guess the decent thing about it is that you have coverage for 6 and 2 as well as HF bands.  Still it looks like you'd have to pull over and do the manual band switcheroo for a major QSY.

-Chuck
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W5DXP
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« Reply #8 on: August 14, 2006, 06:29:19 AM »

> W1CEW wrote: If it needs a decent counterpoise, what would that say about using this antenna for mobile operation? Say 20m? <

A vehicle is usually a decent counterpoise for 20m-10m HF operation. Even hamsticks are relatively efficient on the five highest frequency HF bands.
--
73, Cecil, W5DXP
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73, Cecil, www.w5dxp.com
The purpose of an antenna tuner is to increase the current through the radiation resistance at the antenna to the maximum available magnitude resulting in a radiated power of I2(RRAD) from the antenna.
N6AJR
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« Reply #9 on: August 14, 2006, 09:37:00 PM »

good for mobile if you like to get out to change bands, and fine for portable, ( camping etc) but for the house start with a hustler 5BTV, about $159 at hro and you get 10/15/20/40/80 on on stick about 25 feet tall, and bigger is better with antennas. pole mount with a couple  radials, or ground mout with lots of radials.. ( or not!) a good all around start.

I still have mine up, along with a bunch of others.. its not the best, but you don't have to go out in the rain to change bands
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