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Author Topic: Prohibited Foreign Countries  (Read 804 times)
WN6T
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Posts: 12




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« on: August 16, 2006, 07:56:35 PM »

Are there countries that U.S. hams are forbidden to have communications with? I have looked at the ARRL.ORG site and can not find this. I was licensed in the middle 60's and there was indeed a list of forbidden countries. I am just now getting back into the hobby and want to know. Thanks!

73's,

Tom
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K7KBN
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Posts: 2805




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« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2006, 08:28:06 PM »

I don't think the US presently forbids hams from talking to hams in any other country.  Whether that "other country" will let ITS hams talk to us, or to anyone (North Korea comes to mind...) is up to that country's regulatory agency.
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
N2VPC
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Posts: 107




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« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2006, 08:30:24 PM »

No. There are no "banned" countries at this time.  You still have to follow the FCC rules in all respects though.  Go to the FCC web site at http://wireless.fcc.gov/ for more information.
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WA9SVD
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Posts: 2198




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« Reply #3 on: August 16, 2006, 09:43:29 PM »

Not quite the sane as "banned," but you have to be aware that "third party" communications are only allowed with some countries.  You can find THAT list at the ARRL web sie.  (Be aware, the ARRL's list is current.  There's one page at the FCC's site that hasn't been updated in over three or four years, so it's incomp;ete.  [Think government efficiency.]  Great Britain is now on the allowed list, and has been for over two years, but isn't on the list at the FCC's site!)
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N5LRZ
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« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2006, 05:45:57 PM »

All of the above posts are correct.  There are no countries at this time that a licensed US Amateur is prohibited from talking to another licensed amateur in another country.  A US Licensed Amateur can even talk to a License Cuban Amateur.

BUT this does not apply to 3rd party trafic and Messaging.  Formal Messaging and 3rd party trafic in general requires an agreement between the US and said other country.  

Check the ARRL web site for countries with which 3rd party trafic may take place.
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WA9SVD
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Posts: 2198




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« Reply #5 on: August 17, 2006, 09:53:58 PM »

LRZ:

    Thanks for confirming my point.  But I'm not sure what you mean a U.S. Amateur can "even" talk to a Cuban Amateur.

    While there may be trade and travel restrictions with that country, there has never been any Amateur Radio (or other communication) restriction or ban involving Cuba.

    There are no current "bans" on any countries imposed on U.S. Amateurs by the FCC.  What other nations restrict is their sovreign right.  If another country wishes to ban Amateur communication with another country, or outright refuse to allow Amateur licensure or operation, that is THEIR right.  If someone in such a country wishes to violate their country's restrictions, THEY are the ones who will be in trouble with their own government, not the U.S. (or any other) Amateur who makes contact with them.  
   
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WN6T
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Posts: 12




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« Reply #6 on: August 18, 2006, 01:07:10 AM »

Thanks very much to all of you for your input to my banned stations question.
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W3JJH
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« Reply #7 on: August 18, 2006, 05:42:23 AM »

Here's what the FCC says:

http://wireless.fcc.gov/services/index.htm?job=about_2&id=amateur

"Section 97.111 of the Commission's Rules, 47 C.F.R. ยง97.111, authorizes an amateur station licensed by the FCC to exchange messages with amateur stations located in other countries, except with those in any country whose administration has given notice that it objects to such radio communications. Currently, there are no banned countries."
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KI4PQW
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Posts: 6




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« Reply #8 on: August 18, 2006, 03:35:10 PM »

I've never read anywhere that US hams were ever forbidden from communicating with stations in other countries.

Then again, I'm a newbie. Was there ever such a restriction?

73s,

Dave
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KB4QAA
Member

Posts: 2381




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« Reply #9 on: August 19, 2006, 08:10:29 AM »

Yes, there used to be a banned list.  As I recall it was mostly some communist countries and had no more than a dozen listed.   I think the list was dropped in the late 1970's.

bill
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AA4PB
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Posts: 12855




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« Reply #10 on: August 19, 2006, 09:03:51 AM »

I believe the "banned countries" list was dropped as a result of WARC-99. The FCC rules were never changed and so technically U.S. hams are still prohibited from contacting any countries on the banned list. Since there is no longer a banned list there are no countries listed, and the FCC rule has no effect.
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KB3LIX
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Posts: 1109




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« Reply #11 on: August 20, 2006, 12:00:40 AM »

Are you all quite sure about Third Party Traffic to Great Britian ?

My DXCC list from the ARRL website is several months old (it is dated April 2006) but it contains a note in the beginning of the list that indicates the meaning of the 'Notes' that precede each entry, and it indicates for note "&"

"Third-party traffic permitted with special-events stations in the United Kingdom having the prefix GB only, with the exception that GB3 stations are not included in this agreement"

This sounds like there are still third-party restrictions in place for the UK. The only entry that has the ampersand symbol (&) is the entry for Great Britain.
I must download a new DXCC list.

FWIW
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WA9SVD
Member

Posts: 2198




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« Reply #12 on: August 20, 2006, 04:55:17 PM »

Yes, as a matter of fact, I AM quite sure.  This issue came up (either here or at another Ham web site, QRZ.com) a few months ago.  The FCC "Third Party" list on the FCC's web site is several years old; it hasn't been updated in a long time.  (So much for getting up-to-date info from the "Horse's mouth!"  At least, that was the case a couple of months ago.  It may have been updated by now...)
    The ARRL web site has the latest list.  

    Great Britain and it's possessions FINALLY were added about two years ago.  You are correct; only special event stations in GB were allowed third party communications in the past.  
    Yes, I'd say it's time to update your DX list!  And check the ARRL web site for the latest third party list.

    You can probably search the archives here for the old thread, and it will give the "old" FCC page, and the date of the announcement of GB's addition to the third party list.

    Here's the current "Third Party List."

http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/regulations/io/3rdparty.html

    Note that the proper terminology is "United Kingdom," not Great Britain.  (Apologies to any operators out there who might have felt slighted:  not intentional!)  And the U.K. includes all British posessions, not just Great Britain proper.
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WB4QNG
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Posts: 362




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« Reply #13 on: August 20, 2006, 06:27:24 PM »

I remember in the 70's if you work for some agencies in the federal government. Our local Naval Ordiance Station comes to mind, if you made a contact with any comunist county you were suppose to report it. You had to give them the information from the log and a short description of what was said in the contact. They could fire you if you didn't do it. I didn't work there and I knew no hams that did so I don't know if they enforced it or how they would have known. I did have a freind who work there and he gave me a copy of the order that they gave him.
Terry
WB4QNG
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WA9SVD
Member

Posts: 2198




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« Reply #14 on: August 21, 2006, 12:20:54 PM »

Here's the reply from ARRL's Regulatory Information Bureau, (About third party traffic with the U.K.) who fields questions without Amateur's pestering the FCC for every little detail...

Hi Larry:

This was published in the ARRL Letter in April 2005:

* FCC to update third-party traffic list to include all UK stations: The
FCC
is expected to soon update its Web site listing of countries with which
US
Amateur Radio Service licensees may exchange third-party traffic (ie,
messages on behalf of a party other than the control operator). The
updated
list will include all amateur stations in the United Kingdom (the UK,
the
Channel Islands, including Guernsey and Jersey, Great Britain, the Isle
of
Man and Northern Ireland). The change is already effective. Section
97.115
of the FCC's Amateur Radio Service rules regulates communications from a
station's control operator (first party) to another amateur station's
control operator (second party) on behalf of another person (third
party).
No FCC-regulated amateur station may transmit messages for a third party
to
any amateur station located within the jurisdiction of any foreign
government not on the FCC list or whose administration has not made
specific
arrangements with the US to allow amateur stations to transmit
international
communications on behalf of third parties. The prohibition regarding
third-party traffic does not apply to messages for any third party who
is
eligible to be the control operator of the station. The FCC list of
countries that have third-party agreements with the US is on the FCC Web
site <http://wireless.fcc.gov/services/amateur/about/intoperating.html>.


The link above does show the special GB prefix provision but does not
reflect the total UK callsign third-party agreement that is stated in
the release.  It is my understanding that the FCC is waiting on the
"official notification" through the proper channels.  But third-party
traffic is permissible with UK stations.

Thanks and 73


Dan Henderson, N1ND
ARRL Regulatory Information Specialist
 

    The FCC list STILL hasn't been updated since Feb. 2002.  THAT is over four years, so any changes (including those involving the U.K.) are not reflected in the FCC web site.
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