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Author Topic: Flux Capacitor?  (Read 482 times)
W8JJI
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« on: January 08, 2007, 08:45:53 PM »

What is a Flux Capacitor ?
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N3BIF
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« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2007, 08:53:55 PM »

http://www.answers.com/topic/flux-capacitor
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W5RB
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Posts: 565




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« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2007, 09:12:26 PM »

ROFL ! I love that there's a link for these definitions  .I think flux capacitors are found on the shelf right next to flight line , prop wash , and dc step-up transformers .

Russ , W5RB
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KC8VWM
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« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2007, 09:39:08 PM »

Flux capacitors have been developed by the Mr. Fusion energy company and was originally fueled by extracting hydrogen atoms from ordinary household garbage.

Modern methods to achieve flux dispersal occurs when the flux capacitor is activated using a 1.21 gigawatt power source. If no power source is available, then it is possible to connect a lightning rod directly to the power leads in order to successfully power the flux capacitor. Flux capacitors are rarely used in mobile applications because when a vehicle travels over 88 miles per hour, unusual occurrences are exhibited.

 "Flux" simply means the rate at which some quantity (such as electric charge) passes through a surface (e.g. charge flux).
 
Good luck on your project.

Hope that helps.

73
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KE4DRN
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« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2007, 09:59:07 PM »

How about the Interocitor ?

http://www.shipbrook.com/jeff/interocitor/

73 james
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K9AMA
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« Reply #5 on: January 08, 2007, 10:10:03 PM »

Weren't those mentioned in the Movie "Back to the Future?

73 Bob
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W5ONV
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« Reply #6 on: January 09, 2007, 03:31:48 AM »

 They are the caps that control the voltage output of the Dilithium Crystals, just ask Captain Kirk.
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N4LI
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Posts: 397




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« Reply #7 on: January 09, 2007, 05:13:34 AM »

> Weren't those mentioned in the Movie "Back to the Future?

Why, yes... but, it requires 1.21 "jigoWatts" to operate.  And, where you gonna get that kind of power?

Such is the problem with flux capacitors...

Peter
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W3HF
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« Reply #8 on: January 09, 2007, 05:45:37 AM »

"...it requires 1.21 "jigoWatts" to operate..."

Peter -

I think Dr. Emmett Brown was just using the alternate pronunciation of the standard metric prefix for 10^9, rather than trying to create a new term. Although the computer industry has standardized on the hard "g" pronunciation, some scientists continue to use the soft "g". Both are legal definitions, and especially in 1955, when Dr. Brown was trying to find a source for 1.21x10^9 watts, the more common usage may have been the soft "g".

cf. http://www.answers.com/gigawatts

73,
Steve
W3HF
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N3OX
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« Reply #9 on: January 09, 2007, 05:50:51 AM »

A flux capacitor is a device that stores up magnetic flux in a metallic helix (sometimes wound on a high-permeability material) thereby possessing the property of opposition to the change of electrical current flowing from terminal to terminal.  The potential across the device is proportional to the rate of change of the current through the device.  This device exhibits a purely imaginary impedance with a sign opposite to that of a regular capacitor.
 
See also, "inductor" ;-)

Also, a small storage tank for cleaning and anti-oxidation agent used while soldering.

Dan
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73,
Dan
http://www.n3ox.net

Monkey/silicon cyborg, beeping at rocks since 1995.
KG2V
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Posts: 29




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« Reply #10 on: January 09, 2007, 05:56:47 AM »

I can remember sitting in on a meeting at an electronics company where we were discussing the failure of a prototype unit.  The engineers of both companies had already talked, and done a failure analysis, but now the marketroids of the client were grilling out engineering staff.  The project engineer was aksed what happened, and he responded with a straight face that it was a failure with the flux capacitor, and why it failed.  The Marketroid wroted down the reason, nodded sagely, asked about how we were going to fix the problem, and made some pronouncement.  The Eng staff from BOTH companies were having a great deal of problems keeping straight faces

Score: Engs 1 : Marketing 0
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K9AMA
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« Reply #11 on: January 09, 2007, 10:09:16 AM »

You don't belive it?  Look here...a US Patent on it....http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PALL&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsrchnum.htm&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=6,084,285.PN.&OS=PN/6,084,285&RS=PN/6,084,285
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KC8VWM
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Posts: 3124




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« Reply #12 on: January 09, 2007, 11:15:34 AM »

Also if you have time in the future, I would recommend installing a T bar inhibitor circuit consisting of a dual polarity resistor and doppler diode in series with the flux capacitor.

This will ensure adequate gridcup current in the forward exciter bay reducing any probability of spatial latency and negative bias supply emissions from occurring in the space time continuum.

73
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W9SZ
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« Reply #13 on: January 09, 2007, 01:59:52 PM »

When I was at Dayton in 2006, I saw a Delorean parked in the flea market area.  He had it modified to add a flux capacitor that looked just like the one in "Back To The Future".  Pretty cool!
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