Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Mysterious free antenna  (Read 469 times)
KC2RMT
Member

Posts: 9




Ignore
« on: June 08, 2007, 08:24:33 PM »

Well, just my luck today as I was driving through my town scoping out for garage sales and notices for ones later this weekend (I like finding cheap crap in bulk,) and I came upon a man selling most of the stuff from his house as he was moving across the country and had to get rid of some stuff.  Turns out he was once a ham operator and was trying to get rid of the last of his equipment that he hadn't already given away or sold.  Among this pile of stuff was an antenna, old ARRL handbook, and some variable caps, and ALL for free!  Since I had places to go people to see and things to do, I left without asking much about the antenna.  From what I can tell by the stickers on the antenna, it operates on 10, 15 and 20 meters.  Now I know that with a technician class license this leaves me with the ability to do some SSB on 10 meters and some CW on 15, but what the hay, it's still a neat antenna.  The markings say something along the lines of "High gain" and "Lincoln Nebraska," with numbers that seem to correspond to each section.  The overall design of the antenna looks something like this:

------====>----====>---====>------------------

where each of the thicker sections seem to be larger diameter metal tubes around the main mast of the antenna; I'm guessing some sort of dipole setup.  There is only one coax connector at the bottom of the rig, and 3 horizontal radiators at the top.  In between each set of thicker tubes is a tube that fits between two larger tubes, held in place by pipe clamps, which I am guessing is there to allow fine tuning.  Each section has its own sticker to denote what band it operates on.  What I'm confused about is how you would go about utilizing the individual bands with a transmitter.  Does the resonant frequency of each section provide enough for only the desired part of the antenna to be used?  Does anyone have any experience with this type of antenna, or any helpful insights about how I might go about setting it up properly?
Thanks a million
73, KC2RMT
Logged
K8GU
Member

Posts: 718


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #1 on: June 08, 2007, 08:36:37 PM »

You have a trap vertical.  It might be a Hy-Gain?  I'm not that familiar with their product line of yesteryear.  

The bulges are traps that "hide" the rest of the antenna from the part that you're using.  That is, if the antenna covered 20 and 15 meters, the part below the trap would operate on 15 and the whole antenna would operate on 20.  Traps are just parallel tuned circuits that present high impedance at their resonant frequency.
Logged
OLDFART13
Member

Posts: 242


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #2 on: June 08, 2007, 08:45:17 PM »

Well the price was right.  Good luck with it and have fun on HF.
Logged
KX8N
Member

Posts: 542




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: June 08, 2007, 08:45:23 PM »

If you could post some pictures somewhere (you can use www.imageshack.com for free), I'm positive SOMEONE will know what it is.  If it's in good shape, it looks like you've lucked into a really good antenna.  Use it on 10 and 15 now, and work on upgrading to General so you can get on 20.  You'll be working stations out the wazoo in a couple of years on 10 and 20.

Good find!  Wish I could find that kind of garage sale here.
Logged
KC2RMT
Member

Posts: 9




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: June 08, 2007, 08:52:05 PM »

Yeah it's pretty much brand new; it's aluminum so i guess there's not much physical wear and tear that's gonna show given the modest sunlight seen in upstate new york.
IIRC, all I have to do to cause the antenna to work on a given band is to just ensure that the transmitter is simply transmitting at whatever frequency I want to work, and the other parts of the antenna will essentially be invisible?
Can this antenna also be used for receiving on the 10 15 and 20 meter bands?
Logged
N6AJR
Member

Posts: 9908




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: June 09, 2007, 12:10:39 AM »

yes it also works on recieve
Logged
K4JC
Member

Posts: 76




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: June 09, 2007, 06:37:37 AM »

From your description it sounds like the antenna is a Hy-Gain AV-14AVQ. It covers 10-40 meters and is a fine vertical. Google AV-14AVQ and you'll find lots of information on the antenna, and you can download a manual from the Hy-Gain website.
Logged
KG4QPQ
Member

Posts: 61




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: June 09, 2007, 07:01:01 AM »

Go to the Hy-Gain (Hustler) web site and match up the pictures there. They haven't changed much over the years. You'll need to really take your time tunning it. Follow the radial and mounting instructions for any of the current line like the 5BTV.

I think you'll find what you have operates on more bands that you might think. I'm thinking it's a 4 bander. I have the 5BTV myself, so feel free to email me if I can help. My email is listed here.

Good luck!

Louis
Logged
K4JC
Member

Posts: 76




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: June 09, 2007, 08:42:53 AM »

Hy-Gain and Hustler are two different manufacturers.
Logged
WA3SKN
Member

Posts: 5480




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: June 11, 2007, 08:03:41 AM »

You have a great deal!  But, verticals do need a good ground-plane or counterpoise, so start your planning with that in mind.  Think about the tech 10 meter SSB allocation.  A great place to start!

-Mike
Logged
W0FM
Member

Posts: 2055




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: June 11, 2007, 03:09:37 PM »

I'm thinking that Lincoln, Nebraska is the clue here.  I remember back in the '60's seeing ads in QST and Popular Electronics for a Lincoln, NE company that made a vertical antenna, but the name escapes me now.  I should be getting use to that, but it still hurts.  Maybe it will click with someone else.

Shocked)

Good luck,

Terry, WØFM
Logged
KC2RMT
Member

Posts: 9




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: June 11, 2007, 07:07:10 PM »

Well it turns out that the hy-gain was all the hint i needed, I had no idea that hy-gain was an antenna company and not just a description of the antenna.  it is the 4 band model, which means that it gives me one more band to use with a technician license.
Logged
K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2802




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: June 12, 2007, 08:46:21 AM »

Hy-Gain has been around for over half a century as a ham antenna manufacturer.  They've gone by other names as a result of buyouts and such.

Here's a link to some of their ham line:

http://www.ers.fr/hygain.htm

..back when they were "Telex Hy-Gain".

73
Pat K7KBN
Logged

73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!