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Author Topic: IC-706 MGII Race radio mod  (Read 439 times)
N5LPT
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Posts: 55




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« on: September 26, 2007, 11:39:25 PM »

I am going to be running the Baja 1000 Deaert race this November from Encenada, Mexico dowm to Cabo. We are required to have vhf radio equipment and will be assigned a frequency in the 160 Mhz range on which our team can operate. I have a couple of 706 MGII radios already and also a couple of Yaesu VX-170 2m HT's and wondered if they could be modified to transmit just out of the Ham Band? The radios that are for sale for racers are the same as our ham gear but just chanelized.  A company named PCI at http://www.pciraceradios.com sells them along with all the helment phones and remote PTT switches and in car intercom system as well as Satelite phone intergration. Would I run into more issues with intergrating the 706 MGII's into the rest of the system??? Just what I need to do is buy more radios...... haha

Mark
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N5LPT
Member

Posts: 55




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« Reply #1 on: September 27, 2007, 12:31:34 AM »

Well, this article I found about radio use during the race pretty much answers my questions so I guess we will have to invest in more radio equipment..

http://www.score-international.com/baja1000/2001/Speaks.pdf
?
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WA3SKN
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Posts: 5419




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« Reply #2 on: September 27, 2007, 04:10:56 AM »

There are multiple reasons for buying the required radios instead of modifying your ham eqpt. Remember...

1. You are in a different country, and not under FCC rules.
2. The radios are for a different Service, with different requirements.
3. Your AMATEUR RADIO operation is under their rules.
The word "Border" means something!

-Mike.
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K6AER
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Posts: 3467




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« Reply #3 on: September 27, 2007, 08:11:37 AM »

Boy where do we start here.

•   Ham equipment is NOT type accepted for commercial use.

•   Commercial equipment is built to a much higher standard.

•   The radio is your only link if you need help. CRASH comes to mind. I’ll bet you are not using automotive seat belts, why use non commercial radio equipment.

•   The Mexican government would not know commercial radio equipment form a CB set but that is the least of your problems.

•   Having run that race many years ago I’ll bet this is your first time. This is not like running a closed race track. You can seriously lost and not know it. In an emergency every minuet is precious and the last thing you need is some one not familiar with the radio trying to get help. You might be the one injured. I could just see you partner reading the instruction book while you drift in and out of consciousness telling him or her which button to push.

•   Follow the race rules when it comes to race equipment. These rules have been developed by SCORE over thirty years born by experience.

•   Take a spare GPS, map & compass.

•   If you have not seen any competitors in the last hour, YOUR LOST.

The last piece of advice is: Take lots of Advil Gel Caps. You need it.

Have fun.
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N0IU
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Posts: 1234


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« Reply #4 on: September 27, 2007, 09:28:39 AM »

Besides, you have invested all this time and money into your race vehicle to give you the best performance so it makes no sense that you want to go cheap by butchering several perfectly good amateur radio transceivers to make them do something they weren't designed to do. Even if someone told you how to do it. if you botched the mod and damaged the radio, then you will have spent even more time and money than you would have if you had bought the spec'd radio in the first place.

Scott N0IU
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VA7CPC
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Posts: 2354




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« Reply #5 on: September 27, 2007, 09:56:45 AM »

I agree with everyone else -- buy the damned radios they want you to buy.

However:

My IC-706 mkIIg _was_ modified for "all-frequency" transmit, and _does_ work on the VHF marine band around 160 MHz.

Problems:

1.   No guarantees that it will _keep_ working.  I may have damaged a filter doing out-of-ham-band transmissions in the HF frequencies.

2.  Much more difficult to operate than a normal "commercial" or "marine" VHF radio.  Not what you'd want in an emergency.

3.  No guarantee that it will work on the frequency _you_ want it to work on.

    Charles
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WA9SVD
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Posts: 2201




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« Reply #6 on: September 27, 2007, 02:01:28 PM »

Make sure you do things strictly by the rules.  If you are accused of operating Amateur equipment without the proper permits, it can be confiscated, and it could be VERY difficult (and/or expensive) to get it back.  Remember, you will be operating under THEIR rules, not the FCC's.
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W7AIT
Member

Posts: 487




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« Reply #7 on: September 27, 2007, 04:27:47 PM »

Better not do that, breaking a bunch of laws and get thrown in the Mexican can......
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DA2KI
Member

Posts: 88




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« Reply #8 on: October 02, 2007, 01:31:42 PM »

By the way, your reference document:

http://www.score-international.com/baja1000/2001/Speaks.pdf

incorrectly states that Amateur Radios are regulated under Part 15 of the FCC Rules and Regs.  WE all know it is actualy Part 97.  The Commercial 2-way radio shop that wrote this document should know the difference as well, if it is staffed with knowledgable technicians.  Just about any intentional or unintentional radiating device will have a "Part 15" sticker on it (even computers).  But that does not mean the FCC Regulation governing it's use is just Part 15.
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