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Author Topic: Stripper for RG58 and PL259  (Read 649 times)
K2YO
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Posts: 436




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« on: September 29, 2007, 07:48:32 AM »

Can anyone recommend a good stripper for putting PL259's on RG58?

Thanks,
Bernie
K2YO
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KE3WD
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Posts: 5689




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« Reply #1 on: September 29, 2007, 08:17:01 AM »

Here is an import that I have found to be of good quality and saves $$$ over the domestic made strippers, works well when adjusted to fit the cable:


http://www.mcminone.com/product.asp?product_id=33-9715&catalog_name=MCMProducts


Here are a bunch of others to give you and idea, too:

http://www.newark.com/jsp/search/browse.jsp?N=1000601&Ntk=gensearch_001&Ntt=coax+stripper&Ntx=


KE3WD
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K0BG
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« Reply #2 on: September 29, 2007, 09:30:57 AM »

Cablematic® Division of Ripley Tools Corporation, makes the best one I have ever used. One end trims the outer cover, the other end cuts the shield and center to the correct dimensions. They are made for all popular sizes of coax. Here is a stocking distributor.

http://www.sunsetenterprises.com/series.asp?CODE=6187&C=Installation+Tools&S=Stripping

Alan, KØBG
www.k0bg.com
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N6AJR
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« Reply #3 on: September 29, 2007, 03:02:47 PM »

http://www.sunsetenterprises.com/series.asp?CODE=6187&C=Installation+Tools&S=Stripping  the best, and nice folks too. buy a set of extra blades for later
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #4 on: September 29, 2007, 06:05:13 PM »

Single edge razor blade, 100 for $6.95 at Home Depot.

I can strip RG58/U for a PL-259 installation in about three seconds.

One second to strip the jacket; one second to push the braid out of the way; one second to strip the dielectric from the center conductor.

Five more seconds to use a small scissors to trim the braid to the correct length.

Done.  Eight seconds total.  Sometimes faster, if I have good lighting and my reading glasses.

WB2WIK/6
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N6AJR
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« Reply #5 on: September 29, 2007, 08:59:26 PM »

But Steve, I am not allowed to handle sharp implements any more...Smiley

I some times use a pocket knife or a utility knife, and the cute little orang handles sissors.

I know a couple of folks that tin the braid all around then trim it with a tube cutter. , but I think its too hard to screw on the connector later.  especially when you have to cut it off and put the screw on shield gizmo on that you forgot...  again
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KB5DPE
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« Reply #6 on: September 29, 2007, 10:16:35 PM »

"Can anyone recommend a good stripper for putting PL259's on RG58?"

Why don't you just do it yourself?

Tom
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K2YO
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Posts: 436




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« Reply #7 on: September 29, 2007, 11:31:49 PM »

"Why don't you just do it yourself? "

Tom,

1. Because it's neater and more precise.
2. For a $15 investment I can save a lot of time.
3. I have better things to specialize in.

Why not use a specialized tool if one is available?

Bernie
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K2YO
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Posts: 436




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« Reply #8 on: September 29, 2007, 11:36:34 PM »

Tom,

I forgot, one other reason. When you are up on the roof or on a tower, they are a whole lot safer and quicker to use.

There's a reason why every professional installer uses coax strippers rather than a blade.

Bernie
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WK0F
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Posts: 46




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« Reply #9 on: September 30, 2007, 12:46:54 PM »

I think you missed the humor.... why do you want an exotic dancer to strip the coax.  Just do it yourself.....
 
Terry
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #10 on: October 01, 2007, 08:41:15 AM »

>RE: Stripper for RG58 and PL259  Reply  
by K2YO on September 29, 2007  Mail this to a friend!  
Tom,

I forgot, one other reason. When you are up on the roof or on a tower, they are a whole lot safer and quicker to use.

There's a reason why every professional installer uses coax strippers rather than a blade.<

::Bernie, this isn't true at all!  The only "professional installers" I've ever seen use a stripping tool are cable-TV (or satellite-TV dish) installers.  The tools work well for them because they're always dealing with exactly the same kind of cable -- the kind that's on their trucks!  It's well controlled and never changes.  Very much unlike the coaxial cables amateurs use which vary all over the place, even within a single part number: "RG58" used by hams is extremely unlikely to be mil-spec RG58A/U or RG58C/U made to the old MIL-C-17 standard.  That's because even the military doesn't use that anymore, so it's really not in common production.  What we're using today is mostly RG58 cables made to no standards at all, other than the JEDEC registration criteria which is very loose.  It varies in O.D., it varies in dielectric material, it varies in jacket material, it varies in braid thickness and it varies in center conductor diameter.

For example, RG58A/U with a solid center conductor is #22AWG.  RG58C/U with a stranded center conductor is the same approximiate gauge, but being stranded it doesn't strip anything like the way a solid conductor strips, and there's no possibility that a single tool or single adjustment will work for both.  RG58 "foam" cables, which are very popular because they're more flexible and have less loss, have a #20AWG center conductor which is thicker and will require a different tool or setting.  RG59/U by the mil spec is solid conductor only, and solid dielectric only (as all mil spec cables are).  However, most RG59 used by hams (and also by the cable TV industry) is foam (cellular polyethylene) dielectric and that requires the use of a larger center conductor (to maintain the 75 Ohm characteristic impedance).  Also, a lot of RG59 "TV" cable has two shields (some have more) and that, too, would require different stripping tools or settings.  There's no tool in the world that will accommodate these variations without a lot of adjustment.

In my experience, almost "zero" professional antenna installers use coax stripping tools (other than those installing satellite TV dishes).  I was in this business (installing antennas commercially) for twelve years and never used one, and didn't know anyone else who did, either!

WB2WIK/6
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KE3WD
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Posts: 5689




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« Reply #11 on: October 01, 2007, 08:59:37 AM »

I serviced commercial transmitter, broadcast, repeater installations, etc. for years too, and must say that I think that the only reason many of us did not use a dedicated coaxial stripper has more to do with the cost of 'em "back in the day" than any other reason.  Was just a lot less expensive to carry some razor blades with you.  The "original" US made coax stripper was like a hundred dollar investment for a steel tool and was dedicated to one particular diameter of coax no less.  

Today, with the imported tools and the like, a dedicated stripper is now in my toolkit, matter of fact I carry more than one in the big box, leaving them set up for the strip lengths and sizes of the various cables I typically see in the field.  

Now if we can only get inexpensive hardline preparing tools...


KE3WD
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KB5DPE
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Posts: 298




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« Reply #12 on: October 03, 2007, 11:14:19 PM »

"I think you missed the humor.... why do you want an exotic dancer to strip the coax. Just do it yourself.....

Terry "

Thanks, Terry.  Geez, I didn't think my sense of humor was THAT bad!  Bernie, I meant no reflection on your abilities, it was just a bad (I guess) attempt at humor.  I use the strippers myself (the wire kind) and have several, each adjusted for one of the most commonly used cables.  Sorry for the misunderstanding, guess I'd better stick with my "day job".
73 Tom
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