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Author Topic: Question for Alaska Amateurs  (Read 346 times)
NA0AA
Member

Posts: 1042




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« on: November 10, 2007, 02:16:19 PM »

Attn:  Alaska Operators:

Note:  I’m cross-posting this to two different Am. Radio sites, both the one with the Q in the name and the one that goes well on Rye with Swiss and mustard….sorry, but I don’t want to miss anyone!

The XYL and I have decided to take a camping vacation to Alaska this coming summer.  It’s not going to be a radio trip exclusively but since we are driving, I’ll have the FT-8900 in the car, plus a portable HF station which I plan to include:

SGC SG-2020
LDG AT-11Pro autotuner
Buddipole with long whips and 1 80-meter coil, counterpoise wires
Power supply and misc.

I hope to use the HF gear to have local and long distance fun – am I expecting too much from 20 watts?  Should I upgrade to 100 watts because it will make a big difference?

Should I bring an 80 meter dipole?  Any other equipment that would be necessary or very useful?

Also, you Alaska Amateurs, can you point me towards nets and groups up in your area that I could tie into for some QSO’s and information on more active repeaters?

Any other suggestions on operation in the north would be appreciated – I’ve visited the state before but was not an Amateur in those days.

Regards.
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AD5VM
Member

Posts: 26




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« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2007, 03:10:45 PM »

Wow! sounds like fun. Do yourself a favor and pick up a Par Electronics EndFedz dipole. If you're only running 20 watts, they have one that works on 40/20/10 meters and is rated at 25 watts. Just connect it to the back of your rig with a 10 foot piece of coax and toss the far end over a tree limb. Or pick up one of those fiberglass telescopic masts on ebay (just type in QRP in the search box) No other antenna has a higher rating than the Par endfedz dipoles in the product reviews section of this site.
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AL7B
Member

Posts: 83




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« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2007, 03:47:29 PM »

Alaska Bush Net
7093kHz LSB at 2000 Alaska Time

The net is always on at 2000 whether Daylight Saving Time is in effect or not.

Once you hit Canada and while in Alaska you can operate LSB 7075kHz to 7100kHz.

The net has many QRP stations checking in and with stations from SE Alaska to the northern coast active you should be heard.

I think the Motley Group meets on 3933kHz at 2100 Alaska Time.

I operate CW mostly so not very active on the nets.

Hope this helps.

73, Dick
AL7B
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WA3SKN
Member

Posts: 5526




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« Reply #3 on: November 13, 2007, 05:43:12 AM »

I suggest summer in Alaska and 80 meters is a poor mix, as there is a lot of noise coming over the Pole!
So, consider 40, 30, and 20 meters as your prime bands!  Plan accordingly!

-Mike.
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AL7B
Member

Posts: 83




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« Reply #4 on: November 13, 2007, 12:42:34 PM »

I cannot speak to noise over the pole in the summer but I can tell you the 75 meter nets in Alaska do quite well.  Keeping in mind the 21 hour daylight and shorter propagation.

http://gahleos.obarr.net/links.html
Above is a link of Alaska amateur radio sites.  It might help in the planning and locating area repeaters.

Have a great trip,

Dick
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