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Author Topic: 2M handheld/ VHF marine  (Read 1633 times)
XYZ234
Member

Posts: 82




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« on: December 06, 2007, 04:20:20 PM »

Does any company out there make a 2M handheld that can also transmit on VHF marine freq ? That would be a GREAT radio for some of us !
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K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2825




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« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2007, 04:30:16 PM »

Not likely - it's not legal.

If you are eligible to operate a marine radio, you'll find that some of them can be programmed for 2 meters, and that would be completely legal.  You just can't use amateur gear, which is uncertificated, in a service such as Marine Radio which requires specifically certificated equipment.
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
WI7B
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Posts: 53


WWW

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« Reply #2 on: December 06, 2007, 04:54:39 PM »


K7KBN is correct.  If a FCC-type accepted VHF Marine radio can be programmed to operate on Amateur bands, then an appropriately licensed ham-mariner can use it on both.

However, no Amateur band radio not FCC-typed accepted for marine operation can be used in the Marine bands.

Same goes for HF Marine radios.73,

---* Ken

 
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XYZ234
Member

Posts: 82




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« Reply #3 on: December 06, 2007, 05:46:07 PM »

That for here in Canada too, right ?
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VA7CPC
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Posts: 2406




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« Reply #4 on: December 06, 2007, 08:10:43 PM »

Yes, the same rule in the Frozen North.  You may get away with a modified 2m rig used on the marine frequencies, but you might also get fined and have it confiscated.

I have mixed feelings about this.  I wasn't willing to spend $2K for a marine SSB rig, and used a modified IC-706 (only for emergency comms!) on marine frequencies.

The IC-706 won't transmit any more on any HF frequency over 15 MHz.  Perhaps caused by out-of-ham-band, full-power operation?

The 2m and marine VHF handhelds are much cheaper -- buy one of each.

     Charles
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N5LRZ
Member

Posts: 0




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« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2007, 03:38:12 AM »

Re the previous two answers AND THE original poster..

IF IF IF IF from my understanding of Marine Radio rules and regs that WOULD DEPEND on where you are using the radio.

IF the radio were to be used under the jurisdiction of the FCC in the United States then what you say is true to the best of my knoledge.

HOWEVER the FCC does NOT govern the world. It governs only the United States and a few territorys elsewhere.  And that is all.  

OTHER countries have their own rules and regulations which JUST MIGHT allow such use within THEIR OWN radio jurisdiction.

So the question is a very VALID question if you consider that the original poster JUST MIGHT want to use it in anoter countries where the FCC does NOT have jurisdiction.

RE the Original Poster....

Please provide the readers with the 'Country' in which you will be using said radio mentioned in your post so a proper reply can be made.

N5LRZ
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N5LRZ
Member

Posts: 0




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« Reply #6 on: December 07, 2007, 03:42:07 AM »

I see that the original poster is in Canada.  


If this is correct then a suggestion to the original poster.  Go the Canadian version of the FCC in the US--the government agency whose job it is to issue such licenses.

There should be a web page on the net that you can GOOGLE.  Drop them an Email and ask The Boss himself.  Better yet look for a telephone number and ask them on the telephone.  For the ultimate answer go to the Top.

N5LRZ
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N5LRZ
Member

Posts: 0




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« Reply #7 on: December 07, 2007, 03:43:50 AM »

I see that the original poster is in Canada.  


If this is correct then a suggestion to the original poster.  Go the Canadian version of the FCC in the US--the government agency whose job it is to issue such licenses.

There should be a web page on the net that you can GOOGLE.  Drop them an Email and ask The Boss himself.  Better yet look for a telephone number and ask them on the telephone.  For the ultimate answer go to the Top.

N5LRZ
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N3EF
Member

Posts: 247




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« Reply #8 on: December 07, 2007, 04:07:16 AM »

  Under FCC rules, if you modify a marine VHF radio to operate on frequencies other than the ones it was certified to operate on, it can no longer be "legally" used on the marine frequencies.

Eric N3EF
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WA3SKN
Member

Posts: 5526




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« Reply #9 on: December 07, 2007, 04:40:07 AM »

1. They can be modified.
2. It is NOT legal!
3. Why risk your amateur radio license, possible fines, and possible jail time over something like this?
Keep each service separated!

-Mike.
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AA4TX
Member

Posts: 26




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« Reply #10 on: December 07, 2007, 05:40:59 AM »

The Vertex Standard HX370S and the Icom M90 (discontinued), among others, are both Part 80 (Marine) and Part 90 (PLMRS)compliant, and can be legally programmed and used for Marine / Amateur / PLMRS under FCC rules. These radios are recomended by some districts of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary for the very purpose of use in multiple services (Part 80, Part 97, Part 90). The key is to find a radio that is Part 80 and Part 90 compliant, and so can accept programming for frequencies outside the Marine band. They are often advertised as having the capability of "business channels" programmed by the dealer.

Outside the US and US territories, you will need to check with the appropriate authorities.

KI4LTX
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K1CJS
Member

Posts: 6055




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« Reply #11 on: December 07, 2007, 06:10:52 AM »

Excuse me while I climb onto the soapbox, please.  Thanks.

Throw another wrench (or golder screwdriver) into the works, why don't you!

The original poster asked a question that was answered very well.  If a marine radio (not an amateur radio) can be programmed to operate in a ham band without--WITHOUT--modification, then it is completely legal to use it in both the band it was made for (marine) AND the ham band it can be programmed for.  The key words are WITHOUT MODIFICATION.

The original poster and the answerer did not suggest modifying ANYTHING!

Also, a Canadian ham answered the question about Canada's ruling on the subject--why shoot him or her down and say go to the rulebook?  He/she should know the rules in Canada or they couldn't have gotten their licence.  The Canadian exams are more like exams than the bulldooky 'tests' here in the US.

One suggestion to those people who like to answer out of the subject--LEARN HOW TO READ AND COMPREHEND!  Then you would not be shoving your foot in your mouth past the ankle.

Thanks--I'll hop down now.  73.

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K3CGA
Member

Posts: 18




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« Reply #12 on: December 07, 2007, 08:05:00 AM »

Try an ICOM M-188.  It's marine type accepted and you can add amateur/commercial frequencies in it also.
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AA4TX
Member

Posts: 26




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« Reply #13 on: December 07, 2007, 08:20:51 AM »

Did you mean the M88?
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K4JJL
Member

Posts: 502




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« Reply #14 on: December 07, 2007, 08:21:38 AM »

You could probably get an old Motorola Saber and program ham and marine frequencies in it.  They're pretty sealed up to resist harsh marine envs.

Can't a commercial radio be used for marine service?
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