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Author Topic: What's the cut off point for a boat anchor?  (Read 3848 times)
K4AAA
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« on: April 19, 2000, 04:22:51 PM »

I'm some what of a collector of old stuff.  Mostly radios that I consider to be cut above the rest types.  I have a Collins S-line, couple of Drake C-lines, and am now creating a complete TS-830S station.  

I wonder what the collective feeling is about what exactly constitutes a boat anchor?  A TS-930 is getting to be an old piece of gear.  Is it a boat anchor?  

Anyway... just curious.

73

Bill, W4AN
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W4BCV
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« Reply #1 on: April 20, 2000, 08:13:03 PM »

The normal definition of a boatanchor is that it should include tubes
(valves or firebottles).   My FT980 or W4AN's TS930, although old (read that Classic gear) are not boatanchors.  

Dave K4JRB/W4BCV
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K7NNG
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« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2000, 03:29:17 PM »

My thought is that any radio over 30 years old with tubes is a boatanchor...73
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VE7BGP
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« Reply #3 on: April 29, 2000, 02:39:38 PM »

I think a Boat Anchor refers to any rig or receiver that has mostly hollow state electronics and a heavy power tranny. Something that holds your operating table down and helps you heat the shack. And anything newer than 1970 is not really a boat anchor the year I got my ticket. Japanese rigs really dont qualify as boat anchors.
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VE7BGP
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« Reply #4 on: April 29, 2000, 02:41:33 PM »

I think a Boat Anchor refers to any rig or receiver that has mostly hollow state electronics and a heavy power tranny. Something that holds your operating table down and helps you heat the shack. And anything newer than 1970 is not really a boat anchor, the year I got my ticket. Japanese rigs really dont qualify as boat anchors.
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K4AXF
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« Reply #5 on: May 01, 2000, 03:18:07 PM »

A rig is clearly a boatanchor if it requires both hands to lift it.  This includes Hammarlunds, Hallicrafters, RME, etc.  I can't think of a single solid-state rig that would qualify; so, that kinda limits it to vacuum tube technology. I'm don't think of my Drake C-Twins (or the S-Line I once had) as boatanchors - I lump them in with the Kenwood Twins, TS-520, TS-820, etc., as belonging to the Classic Radio grouping. But what do I know?
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KK7GP
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« Reply #6 on: May 09, 2000, 01:25:36 PM »

A boat anchor is a radio that is so old that it costs more in tube maintenance than it did to buy. =) I had to sell my boat anchor Drake TR-4C station because it seemed I was always buying some 30 dollar tube or another...
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WA5BDU
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« Reply #7 on: May 11, 2000, 11:24:19 PM »

Pretty subjective, isn't it?  I'd cut off at around 30 years old.  Seems like in Arkansas you can get an antique car license plate if your car is 30 or maybe 35 years old.

Yes, It's usually gonna have tubes and be heavy, but I'd say an HK-1B keyer can be a boat anchor.  Maybe for a small boat ... yes, it used transistors but it came out around 1964 and it IS a Hammarlund AND it used relays and a 22.5 volt battery.

And what will be considered a boatanchor in the year 2030?  Surely a TS-440 will qualify, even if it's not heavy enough for a good door stop.

73--Nick
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KB4TDM
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« Reply #8 on: May 23, 2000, 08:00:36 AM »

i think a boatanchor must weigh at least 40 lbs (hence the term "boatanchor")
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W5HTW
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« Reply #9 on: June 10, 2000, 11:32:05 AM »


40 pounds?  Hmmm.  My FT101 weighs about that much, but I consider it a modern radio.  My Hammarlund HQ170 doesn't weigh 40 lbs, I don't think, though it might.  But yeah, it's a boat anchor, as is the Hammarlund HX50 transmitter which, though it still works, is sitting in the garage.  

Is the Collins S-line a boat anchor?  Probably not, maybe more of, as someone says, Classic Radio.  But if weight is a governing factor, my 32S1 with its power supply probably tips the scales at the 40 pound limit someone sugested.  Of course the power supply is separate, but the rig don't do nuttin' without it.   My old DX100B, I wish I still had, would anchor at least four boats, and even the Johnson Ranger would hold down a tugboat.   I think the Collins could float on a raft, actually, so maybe it is only a cousin of a boat anchor.  It does have gobs of those hot little glass doo-dads that keep the shack warm, and provide an interesting night light, and cost like hell at the surplus store.  Looks like looking down on a city at night to lift the lid and peer into the rig.

Definitely my Hunter Bandit 2000B  amp is a boat anchor, and would sink a ferry boat.  And with the exception of the FT101, all of these are over 30 years old.  And the 101 is probably getting close.

Someone mentioned an HK1B keyer!  Yes, I had the other one.  (There were two of them made, apaprently, as I never ran into anyone else until now who ever heard of it!)   I even used mine professionally in my job as a government radio op.  It wasn't heavy, didn't have tubes, but would probably sink a bathtub duck.  Small duck.  Yeah, I think it was/is a boat anchor.

(And to think ... my darned IC-706 will do all the above will do, except for the amplifier of course, and then some.  And then quite a lot, in fact!)

73
Ed, W5HTW


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KF4BOT
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« Reply #10 on: July 25, 2000, 05:36:07 PM »

I consider my Kenwood TS-520 a Boat Anchor. It not only holds my table down, but is as heavy as a deisel locomotive. To me, any radio that is huge and weighs a ton is a Boat Anchor, as compared with today's equipment, which you can literally fit in a coat pocket! Kenwood Technical Support tells me that the TS-520 is of 1973 vintage.
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K3UOD
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« Reply #11 on: September 18, 2000, 01:04:53 PM »

I'd define a boat anchor as something you lug to every hamfest but never generate any interest in (past "What is that thing?").  I believe that the term originally meant something that no longer had any practical use other than as a weight. Some have called my TS 520 a boat anchor; but , it's the newest HF rig in my shack.  (And I love it!)

Ten years ago, any rig that only worked CW and AM (no SSB) was considered a boat anchor.  Now, the 3885 KHz crowd will pay a pretty penny for a clean Johnson Ranger or Heath DX 100.  I guess that means that they aren't "boat anchors" any more.

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WA4CNG
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« Reply #12 on: October 02, 2000, 06:26:43 PM »

It must have Valves, Tubes, Firebottles, plug into 110/220VAC, require at least 5 minutes to warm up, have that wonderful smell of transformer shellac and dust emoting from it, make you sneeze during the process, and have real "High Voltage" in the power supply, something greater than 250VDC.  It also has to be able to be used on the air!
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K2WI
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« Reply #13 on: October 03, 2000, 07:12:12 AM »

Is it bigger than a breadbox?

Rob
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AC5UP
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« Reply #14 on: October 29, 2000, 06:58:32 PM »

When you have to talk someone into hauling it off for you... IT'S A BOAT ANCHOR!
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