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Author Topic: Why isn't anyone calling the rare DX?  (Read 1735 times)
KA5IPF
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« Reply #15 on: February 12, 2008, 04:58:12 PM »

Probably the same way a brand new ham gets a 1x3 call...
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N4ISF
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« Reply #16 on: February 12, 2008, 07:08:22 PM »

when I heard that 20 wpm cw was eliminated from extra.   I thought,  "lowering the standards will lower the quality"  and I instantly decided I was going to retain my advanced status.  Wheras previously I viewed extra class as another step up to look forward to someday.   I was seriously disappointed  that cw was dropped, and as a result not surprised with more poor quality operators moving into "high" positions.   I had to learn cw,   and was happy  to do so, got up to about 17 wpm,   took me a bit over 10 years to get there working at it off and on.   but now we got new blood thinking it's antique and needs to be eliminated.   But didn't they see?   CW was a quality control device, a filter to keep the junk out.
  Once the filter was pulled out we got all kinds of dust and dirt flying in along with the good air.
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N6AJR
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« Reply #17 on: February 12, 2008, 07:42:25 PM »

Well , it is not a cas of one causing the other.  I myself am an "old" ham first licensed in 1978. I am also a 5wpm extra, and also do some VE stuff.

I find lost of folks like to learn CW now that they don't have too.  A good example is right now Ducie Island is on the air and a full half the ststions are on CW.  It took longer for me to work them on CW than phone due to the pile ups on cw.  

sounds like lots of folks still use it. probably always will.  it's a good mode, even for some one like me who struggles with it. but I can still pull my call and a 599 TU out of the din, which is all I need.

  suit your self. there are as many different ways to play ham radio as there are hams to play. suite your self and don't worry about me. I'll do OK.
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W8JI
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« Reply #18 on: February 13, 2008, 02:46:48 AM »

It is a case of one thing causing another.

When we remove goals we remove motivation and reduce overall skill. That's true in anything from science to math to manners to commercial radio, to fraternities, to hobbies.

The root cause of the decline in interest in Ham radio is changing technology, not tests. It was never an overall CW or a technical skill problem, it has always been a change in technology. Cell phones have killed two meters in most areas of the country, not the amateur testing standards. Computers and internet have killed the need for air time to discuss things, not the tests.

The only major thing lowering the test standards has done is redistribute the percentage of people who are interested in radio into different license classes. It's exactly the same effect that occurs in everything else that has been changed, from commercial licenses to driving to national clubs or fraternities.

We can't fix or change problems rooted in social or technical changes by making tests easier or even eliminating them.

 
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PD2R
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« Reply #19 on: February 13, 2008, 03:47:00 AM »

In Holland we only have 2 classes, Full and Novice. I am a Novice class license holder but Novices do have HF privileges, namely the 10 m band, 20 m up to 14.250 and 40 m up to 7.100. For me it was great to get on HF but the only experience I had was on CB.
I hoped to learn more from the Novice class study books but to my great surprise there was no chapter about operating practice to be found, not even a single word!?
Fortunately I had a very experienced Elmer who helped me out a lot. I also joint a contest group with some very experienced contesters and DX expeditioners.

I think that the tests should include some testing of the operating practice and not just the technical stuff. Being able to copy a couple off WPM off code can´t hurt either.
New HAM´s should also take it upon themselves to study some operating practice before getting on air. I for one would feel incredibly stupid calling the DX station on his or her TX frequency when he or she is working split.
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K8AC
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« Reply #20 on: February 13, 2008, 04:43:41 AM »

While operating skill is certainly a factor, many times it happens when you think you're operating split, but aren't.  The SPLIT indicator on a transceiver front panel is often very small or otherwise not noticeable, and can be turned OFF accidentally.  On occassion, my otherwise good logging program fails to set split mode properly from DX spots.  I would be nice if there were a transceiver function of "split no matter what", where you'd have to turn it OFF in order to transmit on your listening frequency.  
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W3LK
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« Reply #21 on: February 13, 2008, 07:43:37 AM »

Tom:

<< Computers and internet have killed the need for air time to discuss things, not the tests. >>

How right you are. At this moment there is a post on the Computer  and Software Forum advertising a new on line internet chat room where hams can discuss all aspects of amateur radio. When I stated I thought this was what our radios were for, I was told maybe there are hams who have mike fright or don't know CW. Sad

Pathetic!

73,

Lon - W3LK
Naugatuck, Connecticut
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CHRYSIPTERA
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« Reply #22 on: February 13, 2008, 07:54:50 AM »

>> How right you are. At this moment there is a post on >> the Computer and Software Forum advertising a new on >> line internet chat room where hams can discuss all >> >> aspects of amateur radio. When I stated I thought this >> was what our radios were for, I was told maybe there >> are hams who have mike fright or don't know CW. Sad

>> Pathetic!

It is ironic that you are berating a Ham Radio chat room on an Internet forum. Enough said.

Jer
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AB8SG
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« Reply #23 on: February 13, 2008, 03:51:45 PM »

Last night that "rare DX" was working on 3.7900, and some fool spoted that he was listening "up". Within seconds, other fools were shouting their callsigns on every frequency from 3.790 to 3.840 without every listening to their transmit frequency. Shame on them. If the "DX" was actually working that large a range, shame on the "DX".
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KC2PNF
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« Reply #24 on: February 15, 2008, 06:36:45 PM »

I heard Ducie on 20m today and I'm pretty sure I heard him say "listening 250 and 270". The spots said 250 - 270 and thus the band from 240 to 280 continuous was alphabet soup, without pause.

It would seem to me that most of the world was peering at their computer screens and having a fruitless time of working VP6DX.

Maybe, after only nine months of having HF privelages I just don't know about the high buck DXpedition equipment that allows them to listen on all frequencies for 20kHz, but it seems to me a lot more likely that the guy is actually listening on the two frequencies that he's calling out right?

KC2PNF
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K9NW
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« Reply #25 on: February 19, 2008, 08:46:10 AM »

>Maybe, after only nine months of having HF
>privelages I just don't know about the high buck
>DXpedition equipment that allows them to listen on
>all frequencies for 20kHz, but it seems to me a lot
>more likely that the guy is actually listening on
>the two frequencies that he's calling out right?


There's no special "high buck DXpedition equipment."  They're using the same radios available to anyone in the amateur community - in this case Elecraft K3.  They are simply tuning their second VFO between .250 and .270.  They are not listening to the whole 20KHz at once.
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W7WQ
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« Reply #26 on: March 16, 2008, 04:36:50 PM »

Sad that now anyone with a pulse is an instant expert.
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