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Author Topic: Single band CW/QRP question.  (Read 421 times)
BECOOL
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Posts: 33




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« on: March 16, 2008, 12:46:02 AM »

   Do you think is a good idea to get an inexpensive single band CW transceiver, like say one of the so called CUB offered by MFJ? I'm a technician with the standard restictions in several bands (I can operate the 80-40-15m bands only) also I have strict space limitations imposed by the company that manages the bldg. we occupy. I'm thinking if I should get a 15m rig which technically uses a shorter horizontal antenna set-up. I live in the West Coast of the U.S Is the 15m band more active and pleasant to work with than other bands in this region?Huh? Additionaly: Can I safely use this hipothetical single band unit with a dummy load to practice my rusted morse code just like you would with a conventional oscillator?  FINAL question, almost embarazed to ask: How do you find frequencies on this single banders without a meter or LCD display? Thank you so much, I apolagize for the length of my post. 73's  
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N8UZE
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Posts: 1524




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« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2008, 04:34:52 AM »

At this point in the sunspot cycle either go with the 40m unit or upgrade to General and go with 20 meters.  Although you will sometimes find activity on 15m, it is rather poor and will reaming so until we start the upswing in the sunspot cycle.
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K1JAW
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Posts: 25




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« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2008, 05:43:25 AM »

I agree with the other reply and I personally prefer 40 meters. I also like the cub but there are other options that you should watch for in the classifieds. Be patient.  With what you are suggesting, your antenna will be most critical.  If you are in a high rise, you might consider making a window mounted, base loaded, vertical - be sure to drop a 1/4 wave wire down from the shield side to offset the vertical portion.

It is easy to build a end of band marker so that you do not creep over the edge of the band, and the coverage of most cw qrp rigs do not cover the ssb higher end. Typically, I would suggest that a new QRP'r answer calls as opposed to calling CQ.  One other comment - look up the freq for the W1AW code practice as their frequency is stable.

I run qrp, and use a dummy load routinely to communicate with a friend a half dozen streets away.  I do not like the idea of using a QRP rig as a code practice oscillator. Hope this helps and 73's   Jim

 

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KB1IAI
Member

Posts: 69




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« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2008, 06:23:40 AM »

hi. i believe you would be quite content
with an mfj 9040. five watts, small footprint,
powered with 1.5 watt wall-wart. filter and
built-in keyer optional. add key, headphones
(dont want to annoy your co-workers, wire
antenna, and your good to go. unless you are
adept at kits, buy the wired unit.
enjoy the hobby.

73 paul kb1iai

ps. hi jim. how ya been?
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K2QPN
Member

Posts: 70




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« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2008, 07:23:57 AM »

I was looking for a QRP rig for use while traveling. I decided on 20 meters. The antenna is small and 20 is open  part of the day even at the bottom of the sun spot cycle. Although I like 15, it will another couple of years before 15 comes into it's own.

I opted for a Small Wonder Labs DSW-20 kit(no longer available). The frequency readout is via morse code. There are some multiband kits available like the ATS-3B.

Happy QRPing.

73, Bob K2QPN
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KC8VWM
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Posts: 3124




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« Reply #5 on: March 17, 2008, 08:39:39 AM »

If I were choosing a single band for a CW QRP rig option, I would probobly decide on 40m because the band is typically useable for both the day and nightime hours. The higher bands offer smaller antenna advantages but I find the band drops out quickly during the eveneing hours. (Happens to be around the same time I usually want to use the radio equipment.)

The lower end of 40m always seems to be buzzing along with a good deal of CW signals day or night. This level of activity proboly provides for an increased chance of making more contacts.

Just my observations.

--... ...-- -.. . -.- -.-. ---.. ...- .-- --
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WA3SKN
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Posts: 5453




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« Reply #6 on: March 17, 2008, 11:23:50 AM »

What time of day do you plan on operating?
15 Meters should be opening regularly in a year or two, but it is a daytime band.
40 Meters is usable during the day, but really opens up at night!
For this time of the cycle, I would try for 40 meters first!
73s.

-Mike.
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WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20560




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« Reply #7 on: March 17, 2008, 12:53:35 PM »

Where are you located (west coast is a big place)?  What's your call?

15m isn't a good choice for low power and a small antenna at this point in the sunspot cycle.

I agree 40m is probably the best all-around choice.

You read the dial like any other dial that doesn't have a digital display.

Prior to the late 1970s, HF transceivers did not have digital displays -- they all had analog dials.  Worked for about 70 years...

WB2WIK/6
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WB6RXG
Member

Posts: 73




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« Reply #8 on: March 17, 2008, 03:05:37 PM »

WB2WIK/6 Said:

You read the dial like any other dial that doesn't have a digital display.

Prior to the late 1970s, HF transceivers did not have digital displays -- they all had analog dials. Worked for about 70 years...



Steve is absolutely correct.  Just don't get too close to the band edges as the dial isn't accurate enough.

Stuart
WB6RXG
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