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   Home   Help Search  
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Author Topic: How to hear your own transmissions?  (Read 1174 times)
KI6PDQ
Member

Posts: 28




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« on: May 27, 2008, 09:38:43 PM »

Is there any way to hear your own FM transmissions?  I know some repeaters have Digital Voice Recording but I think that's a menu driven command for owners and operators only. I do not have an extra transceiver or scanner.
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W7ETA
Member

Posts: 2527




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« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2008, 11:03:16 PM »

With a separate receiver.
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K1CJS
Member

Posts: 6252




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« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2008, 03:43:52 AM »

Without that feature on the repeater or an extra receiver, no.
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N5LRZ
Member

Posts: 0




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« Reply #3 on: May 28, 2008, 04:28:41 AM »

It begs to me and I must ask: why would you want to?

But if its that important to you its pretty simple.  Just have one of your radio pals record your signal as heard on his radio using a recording device and play it back to you.  Set up your radio and leave it alone.

The not so secret of a good FM sound using a radio that is not out of alignment is to simply NOT eat the mic.  Speak in a "Normal" tone and normal volume a few inches away from the mic.

Think of it this way.  When at Wal Mart listen to the people on the public address.  Do you hear more clearly and distinctly the person who """SCREAMS""" like a mother giving birth without the benefit of pain blocking into the mic or do you hear better the person who in a normal voice volume speaking slow and clearly.
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N5LRZ
Member

Posts: 0




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« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2008, 04:30:03 AM »

It begs to me and I must ask: why would you want to?

But if its that important to you its pretty simple.  Just have one of your radio pals record your signal as heard on his radio using a recording device and play it back to you.  Set up your radio and leave it alone.

The not so secret of a good FM sound using a radio that is not out of alignment is to simply NOT eat the mic.  Speak in a "Normal" tone and normal volume a few inches away from the mic.

Think of it this way.  When at Wal Mart listen to the people on the public address.  Do you hear more clearly and distinctly the person who """SCREAMS""" like a mother giving birth without the benefit of pain blocking into the mic or do you hear better the person who in a normal voice volume speaking slow and clearly.
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WA3SKN
Member

Posts: 6582




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« Reply #5 on: May 28, 2008, 04:31:12 AM »

Put your transmitter on a dummy load.  Beg/borrow a receiver and tune it to your transmit frequency.  Listen to the receiver as you transmit.
You can also listen to the repeater's frequency as you transmit and will know how you sound AFTER going through the repeater. This can tell you whether your transmitter has a problem, or the repeater has a problem... useful when trouble shooting!
Note the audio of a digital voice recorder will only be as good as the receiver and the voice recorder combined.
73s.

-Mike.
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AA4PB
Member

Posts: 14422




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« Reply #6 on: May 28, 2008, 05:11:50 AM »

A friend and I used to swap stations so that we could work each other and see how our own station sounded. Probably not such a big deal with a purchased radio but in the days when everyone built their own equipment it was very handy.

Its pretty difficult to get a good feel for how your transmitter sounds while talking and listening to your own signal - unless its *really bad*.
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Bob  AA4PB
Garrisonville, VA
WQ3T
Member

Posts: 209




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« Reply #7 on: May 28, 2008, 07:09:54 AM »

Something to try is the W4MQ web transceiver. You can hook up to a radio on the other side of the country and listen to your frequency over the internet. Has anyone tried this and heard themselves?
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K0OD
Member

Posts: 3013




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« Reply #8 on: May 28, 2008, 11:43:35 AM »

I've used web receivers to listen to my own SSB/CW,  but not FM signals. In some cases you can monitor your own signal from overseas. Quite a hoot to listen to the CQWW from Europe. Can use for A/B antenna tests, audio, keying and probably lots more purposes.

Don't have a URL offhand but there are several that will show up in Google.
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WA2JJH
Member

Posts: 523


WWW

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« Reply #9 on: May 29, 2008, 09:44:07 AM »

If you want to go nutso...Buy a used service monitor.

Wavetek 3000b---around $1000.
IFR's are too expensive
Old Motorola service monitors sold are out of calibration most of the time.

  You will not only hear yourself, you will see your exact deviation and frequency error.
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WA2JJH
Member

Posts: 523


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #10 on: May 29, 2008, 09:44:57 AM »

If you want to go nutso...Buy a used service monitor.

Wavetek 3000b---around $1000.
IFR's are too expensive
Old Motorola service monitors sold are out of calibration most of the time.

  You will not only hear yourself, you will see your exact deviation and frequency error.
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KC2BYV
Member

Posts: 51




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: May 29, 2008, 12:10:03 PM »

Try to find a repeater in your area that simulcasts it's transmissions on it's website.  WB2HWW does so here in NYC.
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KI6PDQ
Member

Posts: 28




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« Reply #12 on: May 29, 2008, 11:06:09 PM »

I keep trying, all I can say is that I really appreciate your imput.
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