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Author Topic: correct way to call cq on six meters?  (Read 273 times)
KC2PTA
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« on: June 07, 2008, 05:25:00 PM »

What would be the proper way to call cq on six meters? Also, when i a,m on 50.125, there all sorts of stations, and never a break in them for any other "new" station to jump in, is it alright to jump in anyway? or if there is no break in people talking, shopuld i stay off?
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N3OX
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« Reply #1 on: June 07, 2008, 05:50:49 PM »

"CQ, CQ Six Meters, this is KC2PTA KC2PTA in Orland, CA Charlie Mike Eighty Nine"

Good to include your grid square... otherwise, call CQ like you would anywhere.

"Also, when i a,m on 50.125, there all sorts of stations, and never a break in them for any other "new" station to jump in, is it alright to jump in anyway?"

Please, please just don't use 50.125 when the band is open!!!  Also, please note that my frustration isn't directed at *you* but at others on six.

The whole calling frequency thing makes sense when the band is totally devoid of activity... you can leave the radio on 50.125 and if 6m opens up you'll hear something.  But that frequency shouldn't be used for QSOs when the band is open.

Call CQ on 50.132 or 50.144 or whatever, I'll find you if we have propagation!  Today, the band was open to the Carribean/Central America from here and  there were several DX stations piled up on the DX calling frequency 50.110 (50.100 to 50.125 is a *DX window* by the way.  It should be reserved for mostly intercontinental QSOs though common practice is that Central American/Carribean DXCCs count as "intercontinental DX" ;-) ).  There's lots of space above 50.125 to make USA/VE QSOs.

But anyway, when the band is closed, it makes sense to call CQ on a calling frequency.  As soon as you know the band is open (like there are 10 guys talking on 50.125) move off and find a CLEAR frequency just like it's any other band.  Those guys on .125 will move off eventually and find you.  It's a ham band, we get to use it all.

73, hope to catch you on.  I heard a couple California stations a couple nights ago.  I have kind of a little station though.

Dan

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73,
Dan
http://www.n3ox.net

Monkey/silicon cyborg, beeping at rocks since 1995.
N4UE
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Posts: 296




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« Reply #2 on: June 07, 2008, 07:03:03 PM »

Hi, Six is my favorite band and most of my activity is there. One thing that is really cool about the modern radios is the 'bandscope' feature. I have a 756PRO I bought in Tokyo, when they first came out. It has all the sensitivity I can use. Believe me, I have compared it to MANY radios...
Anyway, the PRO allows you to 'see' band openings. I will NEVER go back to a primary radio (I have dozens) that does NOT have a 'bandscope'.

Bring on the flames......

ron

N4UE
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W8KQE
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« Reply #3 on: June 07, 2008, 07:52:09 PM »

When the band is open, many stations will call a SHORT CQ on 50.125 (say 3 CQ's, followed by your callsign ONCE, followed by your grid square once, followed by a higher quiet frequency up the band where you'll be listening for a response).  Just before doing this, it is wise to ask if the frequency you will QSY to is in use (ask on that higher frequency).

For example:

First on 50.185: "QR-ZED, IS THIS FREQUENCY IN USE?"

Then on 50.125: "CQ CQ CQ FROM W8KQE, EN91, LISTENING ON 50.185"

If the band is seemingly not open, or 50.125 is quiet, you can call a short CQ on there, and when you get a response, then move up to another frequency.

I've gotten great results this way, and recieved no reports of interfering.
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N4LI
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« Reply #4 on: June 08, 2008, 04:52:45 AM »

> I will NEVER go back to a primary radio (I have dozens) that does NOT have a 'bandscope'.

Could not agree more...

I have a ProII.  The bandscope is unbelievably useful.  I can't count the stations that I needed that I would not have gotten without seeing a blip on the 'scope.

Nothing like seeing a peak pop up below .125!

Peter, N4LI
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #5 on: June 08, 2008, 11:17:22 AM »

Great comments.

It's also popular to "run" strings of contacts exactly on 50.125, while it's being used (shared) by many others.  Seems silly, but this can also save a lot of time on a band that may peak for only three minutes and then have the bottom drop out.

I listen to .125 and amongst a half dozen QSOs I'll hear somebody call CQ right in the middle of all that.  I'll answer them and make a quick exchange amidst all the activity.  It happens so fast nobody really notices...some of these complete "QSOs" last five seconds.

Obviously, not a rag chew, but a quick exchange of data and may result in a "new" something.

It pays to develop "ears" for picking out the station you want even when he's zero beat with 5-6 others, and maybe weaker than they are.

If I want to make a "hit & run" a real "QSO," I'll just say, "W1XYZ 185 please, W1XYZ 185 please" and then simply go there and look for him.  Usually, that works.

Don't bother QSYing up to .130 or .135 or .140 as when the band's open, they're all in use!  Go up much higher.

WB2WIK/6



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WA3SKN
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« Reply #6 on: June 09, 2008, 05:36:09 AM »

If there is an active QSO going on, don't transmit directly on top of it.  There is nothing wrong with tuning 5-10 Khz up or down and calling "CQ", though! Most hams tend to "tune around".
73s.

-Mike.
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