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Author Topic: Failed Ground Rod Installation  (Read 1033 times)
WA3SKN
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Posts: 5554




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« Reply #15 on: August 14, 2008, 10:54:41 AM »

The "copper pipe and water" method works well in certain soils.  I like it because you can keep salt water in it to maximize conductivity.
In any gravel/rocky soil it does not work, and you cannot pound on the pipe to drive it in!
You can install it horizontally in a trench, if needed.  You do want to be below the frost line at your site.  5 Feet is a little shallow, you will want 8-10 feet in most areas.
Time to try an alternate method, good luck!

-Mike.
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N4ZYV
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Posts: 90




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« Reply #16 on: August 14, 2008, 07:41:03 PM »

Once you get to where the pounder is hitting the ground, turn it over and use the capped end to finish. That may be easier for me as I have many years of practice. If you have difficulty, use a sledge. Generally, a 3-5 pound hand sledge will finish it for you. A second rod placed a minimum of 6' (more than 6' is usually better) from the first is good insurance.

Dig a shovel full or two where the rod is going so that the entire rod is underground. Stripping any insulation from the wire and burying it a few inches down will keep it safe from your lawn mower and provide just a bit more earth contact. If you utilize the existing electrical service ground rod, adding that second rod won't hurt anything and may help somewhat.

If the water table is low in your area, don't be afraid to get a sectional rod and keep going. Ground water contact is good.

The electrical service ground rod is simply a supplemental ground meant mostly for some lightning protection. A single 8' rod cannot be counted on for your main electrical ground. Most service grounds are attached to the water service pipe that runs out to the street and all around town or to the well pipe on a rural installation. That is your main ground. With the use of plastic pipe water service in modern homes and businesses, we have to use a foundation ground system.
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