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Author Topic: Does an Eico 1V2 1/2 wave rectifier tube glow?  (Read 1070 times)
AC0FA
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Posts: 298




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« on: September 20, 2008, 10:56:40 AM »

Does an EICO 1V2 1/2 wave recitfier tube glow when running right?

I know some power supply tubes dont. I do have some ohmite carbon resistors that have gone high from high voltage and time in that area and papper wax caps that I will be replacing as well.

I was just curious if this particular peanut tube in the Eico 460 will glow like all the rest when I have every thing straight and the HV is  applied.

The answer would save me a drive to the tube shop for example "It dont glow when its working right."

Thanks, Erik
AC0FA      
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KA5N
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« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2008, 11:05:29 AM »

The 1V2 is a low current high voltage rectifier which was used as a focus rectifier (and for other uses elsewhere) in TV sets.  Since the filament is shaded by the cup like anode you will never see the slight glow.  The "1" in the tubes nomenclature means it is a one volt filament.  It could easily be replaced with a stack rectifier used in portable tube TV's.
Allen
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AC0FA
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« Reply #2 on: September 20, 2008, 11:13:45 AM »

As always thanks Allen,
what the heck is a  
"stack rectifier used in portable tube TV's".
Is this some kind of silicon rectifier diode.  
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KA5N
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« Reply #3 on: September 20, 2008, 11:59:41 AM »

A stack rectifier (or stick rectifier) is a bunch of diodes in series.  The diodes may be silicon but were usually selenium rectifiers.  They look like a ceramic resistor about 2 inches long and 1/4 inch diameter.  
Upon thinking a bit more, the most common use of the 1V2 was in portable B&W TV's.  Which were later replaced with stick rectifiers in small solidstate TV's.  They were usually mounted on the flyback transformers (HV transformers).  
Allen
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AC0FA
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« Reply #4 on: September 20, 2008, 12:08:22 PM »

Thanks Allen thats about what I figured.
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N6AJR
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« Reply #5 on: September 20, 2008, 06:40:23 PM »

stack rectifier always looked like a stack of saltine crackers with peproni between them.
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N6AJR
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« Reply #6 on: September 20, 2008, 06:40:23 PM »

stack rectifier always looked like a stack of saltine crackers with peproni between them.
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WA3SKN
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« Reply #7 on: September 22, 2008, 07:35:06 AM »

You may or may not be able to check the filament visually, but you can always check it with an ohmmeter.  If bad, they are always "open" (well, 99.999% time anyway!).
73s.

-Mike.
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