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Author Topic: Heathkit HD-1410 keyer & Yaesu FT-757GXII  (Read 382 times)
DJWHYTE30
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Posts: 29




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« on: November 10, 2008, 07:12:43 PM »

I am getting back into amateur radio after a 30 year absence. When I was active on CW, I used the Heathkit HD-1410 keyer on my Yaesu FT-101E and it functioned perfectly. I now own a Yaesu FT-757GXII and I would like to use the HD-1410 on it but I find there is much confusion about. I have read about 'grid block keying (absolutely no idea what that means)', 'cathode keying (again, no idea what that means either)' and polarity considerations etc. My question is: what EXACTLY do I need to do to get this keyer working with the FT-757. Currently, it uses a 2-wire cable into a 1/4" phono plug and that plugs into the FT-101 and works perfectly but I understand that a third wire is needed with the FT-757. I am confused on how to modify/adapt the keyer to the FT-757. If I plug the keyer into the 757 with the keyer switch on the rig in the 'MANUAL' position, it keys the rig and transmits a solid continuous tone. Any help available? THX -Guy
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NU7J
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Posts: 45




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« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2008, 08:58:23 PM »

Your Heathkit keyer contains a built-in paddle.  If you use that with the 757, you need to set the keyer switch on the 757 to the "Manual" position.  In this case, only two wires are needed between the external keyer and the 757.  

The 757 has a built-in keyer. So if you wish, you can plug a paddle into the 757 and set the keyer switch to the "Auto" position. In this case, you'll need 3 wires between the paddle and the 757's built-in keyer.  

You should be able to use the same cable as you used on the FT101, just make sure that you set the 757 keyer switch to the "Manual" position.

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WA6HDZ
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Posts: 52




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« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2008, 10:36:24 PM »

"Grid-block" and "cathode" keying were methods popular with tube finals.  In a grid-block scheme a negative voltage (30-60 volts or so)was grounded to "unblock" the tube when you wanted to send.  Cathode keying grounded the cathode to allow the tube to conduct, which meant that the plate voltage could appear across the key terminals.  Heathkit stuff used grid-block a lot.

Newer gear uses digital logic and has the keyer built-in.  No need for the HD, all you need is a plain paddle. Needless to say the voltages are much safer,too.   I don't know if the HD-1410 can switch low positive voltages or not if you're sentimental and want to use it but it would tell you in the manual.  If not, an adapter with an optocoupler is pretty straightforward.
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W5RKL
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Posts: 889




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« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2008, 05:00:12 AM »

Using an HD-1410 keyer with the FT-757GX/GXII, is quite simple.

You will need a 1/4" stereo plug, obtainable at Radio Shack or many of the on-line electronics parts outlet, and a simple stereo interconnecting cable, the one with RCA plugs on each end, cut in the middle.

First, cut the stereo interconnecting cable to the length you need. DO NOT cut the RCA plugs off! The HD-1410 keyer has RCA female sockets on the rear of the keyer.

Second, strip back the outer covering exposing the center conductor and braid. Remove a small amount of outer covering on the center conductor.

Solder the cable's center conductor to the 1/4" stereo plug's "SLEEVE" connector and the cable's shield to the stereo plug's "GROUND". The 1/4" plug's "TIP" is not used.

On the top of the 757 place the KEYER switch in "MAN", plug the 1/4" plug into the 757's KEY jack on the rear of the 757 (can't miss the keyer socket it's the largest socket on the rear of the 757 series radio's) and the RCA plug end of the cable into the HD-1410's KEYER OUTPUT socket and you're ready to use the HD-1410 with the 757.

The HD-1410 will key either POSITIVE or NEGATIVE keying voltages "automatically". There is no need to change any jumper settings or rewire the keying circuit.

73
Mike
W5RKL

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W5RKL
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Posts: 889




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« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2008, 05:13:32 AM »

I used the wrong terminology on the 1/4" stereo plug when I said "SLEEVE". I should have said "RING". The "RING" is the middle conductor on the plug's shaft. If you aren't sure which connector to solder the cable's center conductor to, use an ohm meter. Looking at the 1/4" stereo plug connectors, the long connector is the "GROUND", the "TIP" is the center connector and the "RING" is the other one.

Sorry about that.

73
Mike
W5RKL
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W3LK
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Posts: 5644




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« Reply #5 on: November 11, 2008, 06:54:38 AM »

The correct terminology is TIP, RING and SLEEVE.

The TIP is obviously the very end of the plug.
The RING is the short, insulated section just behind it.
The SLEEVE is the long section from the RING to the flat face of the barrel.

There is no GROUND in the nomenclature, although the SLEEVE is commonly used as a ground connection.

73,

Lon - W3LK
Naugatuck, Connecticut
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DJWHYTE30
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Posts: 29




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« Reply #6 on: November 12, 2008, 07:43:36 PM »

Hi Mike (W5RKL). I followed your instructions and voila...works perfectly, as you said it would. Thank you VERY much!
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