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Author Topic: Shingle roofing/Tripod ????  (Read 888 times)
N4ZFQ
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Posts: 13




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« on: January 07, 2009, 12:07:43 PM »

I plan to mount a tripod to the roof of my Cape Cod for a V-U antenna stack. I have added the needed extra framing to the trusses under where it will sit. My question is: Will the shingle material leak at the point where the lag bolts will penetrate without some type of sealer? I've been told by a roofing contractor that no sealer is needed, but I'm still not convinced yet. Does anyone have any experience with this project??
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N5VTU
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« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2009, 12:31:41 PM »

I have no first hand experience, but down here on the gulf coast, probably 90% of the homes have asphalt shingle roof systems.  The satellite TV installers (Dish Network and DirecTV) all use some sort of asphalt based sealant over the heads of the mounting bolts used on their dish mounts.  Not sure if it's actually required or just done as cheap insurance.  I don't see how using a sealant could hurt as long as it's chemically compatible with your application and suitable for your climate.

73,
N5VTU
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KG4YMC
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« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2009, 12:43:01 PM »

My two cents worth. Can you get those rubber gasket washers like they use on screws for metal roofs and put on lag bolts ,should be ok then. I would also put some roofing tar on bolt heads , should be ok . down here in florida at our old qth in ocala, we had the infamous flat roof, you become quite famililar with 5 gallon buckets of roofing tar and trying to find the leaks , hope y ou  don't have a flat roof , anyway  tmi , but slow day at work so , just put sealer on , should be ok 73 kg4ymc
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AA4PB
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« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2009, 01:16:34 PM »

Get some roofing tar from the local hardware store and a putty knife. Put a liberal amount of tar on the bottom of the tripod feet before setting it in place. Bolt it into position and then coat the top of the feet, including the bold heads, with roofing tar.
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K1BXI
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« Reply #4 on: January 07, 2009, 01:32:52 PM »

As long you don't drill a large hole for the lag bolts they will seal them selfs as they go through the asphalt shingles. A little roof cement before and after the installation under each leg is not a bad idea as the previous poster said.

Many tripods come with asphalt pads to seal the legs.

John
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AI7RR
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« Reply #5 on: January 07, 2009, 02:16:31 PM »

Spend the $2 necessary for some sealant. You'll feel better at night when it's pouring rain.

73..Roger
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K5LXP
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« Reply #6 on: January 07, 2009, 03:08:59 PM »

I put the tripod in place, make sure it's true, then drill holes for the lags.  I get the lags started, then one leg at a time, I lift them up and goop silicone around each of the lags between the shingles and the foot of the leg.  Finish tightening the lags and that's it.  As the lags tighten, the silicone is squished around the bolts, completely fills any voids between the tripod feet and shingles, and the bead of excess silicone around the foot forms an additional barrier.

I guess you could goop it up with roofing sealer but the silicone is easy, fast, neat, and good for 50+ years.


Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
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K4CAV
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« Reply #7 on: January 07, 2009, 03:17:17 PM »

If you don't use a sealant you're roof will leak. Guaranteed.

http://www.henry.com/Repairing_and_Preventing_Roof.131.0.html

Home Depot or Lowe's sells similar products.

Jim /K4CAV
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K8POS
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« Reply #8 on: January 07, 2009, 05:02:46 PM »

Mine has been up 6 + years now and not a drip.  I use aquarium sealant.  Put a dab in the hole before you put the lag bolt in and some under the tripod foot. Use washers and make sure it squeezes out when you tighten it down.  

Bob
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KB9CRY
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« Reply #9 on: January 08, 2009, 04:48:57 AM »

Will the shingle material leak at the point where the lag bolts will penetrate without some type of sealer?


Yes
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WA3SKN
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« Reply #10 on: January 08, 2009, 05:01:17 AM »

The shingle will usually seal.
But, Why chance it?  Use some RTV or other silicone bathtub caulk, either clear or black, and you will KNOW it is sealed.  
A simple and inexpensive solution!
73s.

-Mike.
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K1BXI
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« Reply #11 on: January 08, 2009, 10:18:04 AM »

As a building contractor I can tell you if done right you can screw lag bolts in your asphalt shingled A roof up near the ridge all day long and they will never leak. In fact you could bore a 1/4 inch hole and just leave it and still not have a leak. At the high point of an A roof most of the water will run around the hole, not over it. Has to do with surface tension. Of course I wouldn't recommend anyone do that!

By all means, use a sealant as added protection. However if one lives in the Northern climates, like me in Maine, one recommendation that hasn't been covered here is to be sure your lag bolts do not protrude through the underside of the roof any distance. The reason being that in the very cold weather they will collect frost balls and that action of freezing and thawing may loosen up the lags.

Not to worry about in in 4 land I guess.

John
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N4ZFQ
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« Reply #12 on: January 08, 2009, 11:03:03 AM »

Nice dialog guys. I'll head to Lowes for some roofing tar and sleep easier at night.

My roof pitch is 12-12 so standing water is not an issue.

Thanks for the input.
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WMCO
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« Reply #13 on: January 08, 2009, 05:49:54 PM »

If you can, put the tripot over the garage or at a place where it is easy to check ever so often for leaks especially after a high wind. You don't want to mount it over the main part of the home where it will leak onto the insulation and by the time it has made its way through it, the sheetrock and paint so you can see it from insite the home the damage is done and it will cost a lot of money to repair. As a principle I always mount them over the garage where I can see a leak the instant it happens.

J.C.
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AA4PB
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« Reply #14 on: January 09, 2009, 03:43:29 PM »

BXI: I had a leak where the roofing contractor missed and put an exposed staple through the asphalt shingle. After many years the staple rusted out and left two tiny holes. The leak was small enough that I never noticed it until the plywood rotted out under the shingles. You won't catch me leaving exposed holes in my roof. Asphalt roofing tar is too inexpensive not to use it and be sure. I wouldn't use bathtub caulk, silicon caulk or anything else not designed for an asphalt roof.
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