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Author Topic: Parts for a TS-520  (Read 485 times)
KB1HYS
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Posts: 2




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« on: June 12, 2004, 02:44:13 PM »

I am looking for a source for the meter lights on a ts-520. I have the manual with the kenwood partno's but can't cross reference to anything. Anybody have a source?

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N3BIF
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Posts: 1190




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« Reply #1 on: June 12, 2004, 04:19:57 PM »

  Got some a few years back from "Beltronics" In New England, http://www.beltronics.net/Amateur.htm
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N2FZ
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Posts: 23




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« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2004, 11:43:12 PM »

If they are the same as  the 830 which I think they should be, I believe I bought two of those little lites on wire pigtails and wired them in series to make up  6 volts and just tapped them across the 6146 filament winding.  I think they were 3 volt bulbs and I bought them at Radio Shack.  I used a little caulk to stick them in place behind the meter.   Works fine. Plenty of light.  

n2fz
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N2FZ
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Posts: 23




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« Reply #3 on: June 23, 2004, 11:43:36 PM »

If they are the same as  the 830 which I think they should be, I believe I bought two of those little lites on wire pigtails and wired them in series to make up  6 volts and just tapped them across the 6146 filament winding.  I think they were 3 volt bulbs and I bought them at Radio Shack.  I used a little caulk to stick them in place behind the meter.   Works fine. Plenty of light.  

n2fz
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W9GB
Member

Posts: 2623




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« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2004, 02:46:28 PM »

Edward -

If you use your VOM and measure the voltage where the bulb is at, you can then determine the bulb's voltage.  An LED could be used with a suitable dropping resistor (lots of colors as well as high brightness versions)

Here is a great LED tutorial page (Kelsey Park School - UK)
http://www.kpsec.freeuk.com/components/led.htm

Greg
w9gb
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