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Author Topic: Station Master Antenna  (Read 3088 times)
K3CLT
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Posts: 55




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« on: March 21, 2009, 02:04:05 PM »

I was given a Station Master antenna cut for 460-470mhz.
I was going to use it for my company base station antenna. I picked up an adapter for the "N" to 239 connector and hooked up a radio to the antenna. I tried to listen to a local repeater on the antenna but did not hear anything. I used an OHM meter and checked across the connector and found it is shorted.
I want to open the antenna and look at the guts to see if I can see anything that doesn't look right.
Can anyone give me some direction on how the antenna comes apart?
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N3JBH
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« Reply #1 on: March 21, 2009, 02:34:10 PM »

Hey Chuck Look up KR3P and talk to him. Joe would probably know about that antenna quite well.
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G4AON
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Posts: 542




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« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2009, 03:20:18 PM »

A Google search produced this article, is this the type of antenna you have?

http://www.srgclub.org/CollinearAnt-Repair-SMaster.html

Most commercial antennas have a DC short across the antenna, seeing low Ohmic values across the antenna socket may not be a sign of a short to RF frequencies.

73 Dave
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W8JI
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« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2009, 08:57:09 PM »

You should read a short on a Station Master antenna.

The antenna is a series of inverted transmission lines with a short near the upper end, so it will naturally read a short if it is good.

I would check your cables and connections before ripping the antenna apart. Some will come apart, but really old ones will NOT. The real old Station Master antennas are potted with wax inside.

73 Tom
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K9KJM
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« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2009, 10:29:23 PM »

The Station Master antennas are some of the best fiberglass omni antennas ever made.

As mentioned, They are supposed to show a short.

I dont know about the 460-470 version, But the 450-460 version works just GREAT down in the ham band as it comes.

Rather than wreck what may very well be a good antenna, Try to find someone who can use one that is  higher in the band.  That should be a perfect antenna for a GMRS station or repeater!

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AI7RR
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Posts: 164




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« Reply #5 on: March 23, 2009, 10:32:05 AM »

You should try to find someone with an antenna analyzer to check it, or put a good swr meter on it and test it with a low power tx. Much easier than tearing this thing apart. They won't go back together nearly as easy as they come apart. In my experience, Station Master is a hard antenna to beat for an omni application and they're pretty spendy.

73,,Roger
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WA3SKN
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Posts: 5496




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« Reply #6 on: March 23, 2009, 11:12:42 AM »

"I was given a Station Master antenna cut for 460-470mhz"
So what frequency are you trying to use it on?
You can't check impedance with an ohmmeter.
What are you TRYING to do?

-Mike.
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K3CLT
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Posts: 55




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« Reply #7 on: March 23, 2009, 05:45:01 PM »

I am going to try and use the antenna with my company radios. 464.55mhz.
I connected a coax and radio to the antenna and thought that I should be able to hear a repeater at 444.000 but I didn't. The antenna is old but I have the original design paperwork that came with it. I am not sure if the antenna was ever installed. It does not appear to to weathered.
I am out of town right now and will have to do some additional tests to it when I get back home.
Thanks for the good information on the site that shows how to open a Station Master. I have a second antenna that I got from a building that I was taking down. It is cut for 154.00mhz. It is a Super Station Master. I gave it to one of the repeater operators in my area and he said that it was hard to change the frequency on the antenna. From looking at the web site it does not appear to be too hard to change it if one does a little planning.
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K3CLT
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Posts: 55




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« Reply #8 on: March 25, 2009, 07:38:27 PM »

I found the problem to be the jumper coax I was using had a short.
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NO6L
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Posts: 179




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« Reply #9 on: March 25, 2009, 07:59:00 PM »

So, how's it work. They are an excellent antenna. But for 2M you would probably want one designed for 150 - 152 Mhz. I've got one and the VSWR is flat until you get past 146 and it tops out at about 1.5 on 144.
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W0FM
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« Reply #10 on: March 26, 2009, 11:15:21 AM »

Hi Chuck,

Are you certain that you have your company's frequency correct?  464.550 is an "itinerant" frequency, limited to 35W ERP and not valid for permanent operation (unless you are in the Detroit area).  It is intended for use by units that are not in a fixed location.  While that Station Master would look cool on the back of a truck, I doubt that you'd do that.  Shocked)

Just curious.

73,

Terry, WØFM
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N8IPO
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Posts: 6




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« Reply #11 on: August 10, 2011, 05:16:18 PM »

Hi Everyone,

Our clubs 2M repeater which uses a station master antenna took a lightning hit. We have removed the internal copper sections from the fiberglass whip. We found that in the lower section which houses the coax connector a small copper wire that runs from an inside section/connection to the larger outside section fried open. How can I open the lower copper section to replace this wire? Does the bottom section near the connector un-screw?

Thanks for any help.
73, Jay
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